Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts and Links November 6 to November 22

 

Visual Communications Marketing Copyright Open Education Design Thinking

Don Gorges

Don Gorges

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Don Gorges commented on this

__A recent blog posting by David Wiley pointed to a problem of stereotyping, blind distrust of, and even antagonism toward, ‘commercial entities’ by those involved in the Open Education Community. [ Stereotyping, Behavior, and Belonging in the Open Education Community by David _ http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/4794 _ ]

This Pearson video is worth a look and, hopefully, it helps put things into perspective.

people-of-pearson

People of Pearson

YouTube

Recently in our Hoboken, NJ office, we asked Pearson employees a few questions about why they work here. Here’s what they had to say.

2016 11 22

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Don Gorges commented on this

A Glossary of Engraving Terms

Due to its insanely minute ability to render detail, engraving remains the most amazing print reproduction process in the world. Albeit stationery-centric, I wrote a book about it, The Complete Engraver. For a wider audience, I excerpted and edited the glossary of terms and definitions of this erstwhile and under-appreciated process.
engraving-glossary-v2-nc-wfotos-2FIGURE 2 – Close-up: D.J. Pound engraving of Prince Albert illustrating how the detail is rendered, one dot and dash at a time—in engraved prints. The original of this print was engraved by hand. Courtesy of the author.

__Several Minneapolis Institute of Art videos help describe Printmaking Processes: Intaglio: _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNKn4PORGBI __ Printmaking Processes: Lithography _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHw5_1Hopsc __ Printmaking Processes: Relief _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0skLwaFpn0 __ Printmaking Processes: Screenprinting _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wogKeYH2wEE _

The Printed Image in the West: Engraving

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/engr/hd_engr.htm

2016 11 22

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Excellent points, Michael. Learners/Students should/can also be enabled by providing ways for them to be more self-aware – to understand, interpret, correlate and make use the data collected – i.e. visibility and control of data points that enable them to monitor and modify their own behaviour and habits

Analytics Literacy is a Major Limiter of Ed Tech Growth

Analytics Literacy is a Major Limiter of Ed Tech Growth

mfeldstein.com

Right now, the educational technology market is blithely barreling down the road of developing sexy, sophisticated algorithms. Setting aside the very serious and poorly attended question of student data privacy, there is an implicit assumption that if the algorithms become sophisticated enough, then the market will follow. But “sophisticated” also means “complex.” If we, as a culture, lack the basic literacy to have clear intuitions about what “a 70% chance” means, then how likely is it that we won’t have shocks that cause us to distrust our learning analytics because we didn’t understand their assumptions and limitations? These products face very serious (and completely justifiable) market risk as long as practitioners don’t understand them.

We need to transform our teaching culture into one of learning science and data science literacy. We need our educators to understand how algorithmic storytelling works and develop intuitions about data interpretation. There are two sides to this coin. On the one hand, this means developing new skills and embracing the sciences of teaching and learning. On the other hand, it means not fetishizing the instruments to the point where we no longer think to touch the patient’s back. Data should extend our senses, not be a substitute for them. Likewise, analytics should augment rather than replace our native sense-making capabilities.

2016 11 20

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Don Gorges commented on this

__The Global Information Technology Report 2016 – Innovating in the Digital Economy, highlights striking innovation patterns in the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) data that can help point the way for policy and investment priorities. _ http://reports.weforum.org/global-information-technology-report-2016/

networked-readiness-index

2016 11 20

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Follett Corporation today announced it has acquired Valore Inc. and the ValoreBooks marketplace solution for students and bookstores to buy, sell and rent college textbooks online. [no mention of the status of Boundless Textbooks which Valore had acquired Apr 2015] __

Follett Acquires Valore Inc.

follett.com

Nov 17, 2016 – Follett Corporation, a global leader in education and entertainment content distribution, today announced it has acquired Valore Inc. and the ValoreBooks marketplace solution for students and bookstores to buy, sell and rent college textbooks online.  Combining the convenience of the ValoreBooks marketplace with the scope and capabilities of Follett will provide campus stores and students greater access to more affordable course material options.  Terms of the transaction were not released.

2016 11 17

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Don Gorges commented on this

Stereotyping, Behavior, and Belonging in the Open Education Community

Stereotyping, Behavior, and Belonging in the Open Education Community

opencontent.org

Stephen Downes points to some older but interesting posts by Lisa Petrides and Bill Fitzgerald about the role of commercial actors in the open space. It’s a topic that I’ve been thinking about recently, particularly with yesterday’s revelation that Microsoft has joined the Linux Foundation. For someone who was online during the 90s, this is completely unimaginable. I had to read the full announcement to convince myself it was true. What the heck is going on?

[-]

To end where I began, let us pause to consider the open education analog of Microsoft joining the Linux Foundation. Can you imagine a future in which Pearson, McGraw Hill, or Cengage announce that they had openly licensed part of their catalog, publishing it online for the world to freely use, download, edit, and share? (Before you laugh at the impossibility of this, let me remind you that Microsoft just joined the Linux Foundation.) How would the community respond? How would you respond? I would welcome them with open arms, and hope you would as well. Just as open source software has benefited immensely from respected and valued contributions from IBM, RedHat, Google, and other companies, open education would benefit significantly from greater contributions from companies. Specifically, students would benefit significantly from these contributions. We, the open education community, just need to restrain ourselves from running organizations out of town on a rail simply because they’re for-profits.

I hope that in the near future we can collectively reach a place where we judge organizations by their behavior and not their articles of incorporation. We should be welcoming, cheering for, and supporting companies that behave in ways that are consistent with our values. I’ll reserve dreams of a distant future where we achieve No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor for the mid-2020s.

Don Gorges commented on this

__David Wiley’s sermon-approach to promoting the norms and values of Lumen Learning OER services is an authentic ‘one and only’ marketing strategy _”David: I’m a Mormon, so that’s what you get when I’m at the front of the room. My approach to life is very much I roll out of bed every day and whatever it feels like God wants me to do that day is what I’m going to do. [-] Whatever feels to me like is the thing that will be most useful to Him is what I’m going to do.” When David says “Textbooks are immorally expensive” I know where he’s coming from, and don’t discriminate against his field of endeavor. But this judgemental rhetoric within the OER community is disappointing when you expect Academics and educators to be thoughtful, analytical, and beyond intellectually lazy habits like stereotyping.

2016 11 17

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Michael Haggen, Chief Academic Officer, Scholastic Education. “The report also shows us educators’ belief that given the right resources, including high-quality instructional materials, community and family partners, and professional development, they can provide a quality education for every young person who walks through their doors.” __

Survey of Teachers & Principals Explores Barriers to Equity in Education and the Resources Needed to Support Students

mediaroom.scholastic.com

The views and experiences of more than 4,700 public school Pre-K–12 teachers and principals representing all 50 states and the District of Columbia were revealed today by Scholastic (NASDAQ: SCHL) in a new report, the Teacher & Principal School Report: Equity in Education. Findings show the overwhelming majority of educators (97%) agree that “equity in education for all children should be a national priority.” However, they report that barriers to equity are pervasive across school poverty levels and a lack of resources to support students exists both in- and out-of-school. The report provides new data on teachers’ and principals’ views regarding the barriers to equity, educators’ funding priorities and personal spending for students and classrooms, the role of families and communities, and professional development needs.

To download the full report, visit www.scholastic.com/teacherprincipalreport.

2016 11 16

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Don Gorges commented on this

Our 2016 Advocacy Week Recommendations

Our 2016 Advocacy Week Recommendations

casa-acae.com

Post-secondary education continues to be the great equalizer in Canada, providing knowledge, training and economic opportunity to all types of people across all fields of interest. Knowing this, government must continue to build on its commitments for equitable growth by making post-secondary education accessible, affordable, innovative, and high quality. Doing so will open doors for all Canadians to achieve their personal and professional goals and contribute to society in a meaningful way.

While there is no single mechanism for securing long-term economic growth within a country, ensuring Canada has a highly trained and educated population is a strong step in the right direction. In addition, an educated population is also proven to promote higher levels of engagement among citizens, resulting in greater social benefits for communities throughout the country.

 The Canadian Alliance of Student Associations (CASA) is calling on the federal government to lead Canada by investing in an inclusive and innovative economy.

Don Gorges commented on this

__CASA recommends the following federal government investments: _$27 million per year to establish a six-month, interest-free grace period for CSLP loans; _$50.1 million per year into the CSGP and allow master’s and doctoral students to access the program; _establish a funding mechanism to support the up-front costs of accessing a mental health disability assessment through the Canada Student Loans Program at a cost of $9 million per year;

__$106 million per year over the next three years to fully fund the Post-Secondary Student Support Program and address the program’s backlog; _create a “Reconciliation through Post-Secondary Education” Program to support reconciliation programming at institutions throughout the country at a cost of $26 million; _expand experiential learning opportunities by investing an additional $73 million over 4 years into the Post-Secondary Industry Partnership and Co-operative Placement Initiative; _adopt the model used in Quebec to create a Canada Training Incentive; _support complete research costs, at a cost of $286.5 million per year;

__and invest $7 million per year as a pilot project for supporting OERs, as they increase access to learning for all of society and are capable of reaching non-traditional student groups. The details of the proposed OER Pilot Program investment are not found in the CASA briefing document _ http://media.wix.com/ugd/ca1567_78b2bae6fa7b438faf335f38ee9cc364.pdf

2016 11 13

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Don Gorges commented on this

__You are a highly trained, skilled professional, but the academic job market is less than rosy [The 2016 OCUFA Study of Precarious Employment in Academia] . . . Some advice for an ‘academic entrepreneur’ who can convince others that your independent online course is a good investment of time and money. __

Advice to academics for creating and selling online courses (essay) | Inside Higher Ed

Advice to academics for creating and selling online courses (essay) | Inside Higher Ed

How to Create and Sell Courses Online

Kirsten Drickey provides some concrete advice for leveraging your teaching experience and subject matter expertise by teaching online courses beyond the academy.

2016 11 15

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Don Gorges commented on this

Recommended Reading: Times Higher Education (THE) Reports on Student Views of Blended Learning

the-report-blended-learning-survey
Citing in-house research that surveyed over 100,000 students in the United States, THE reported late last week (see article) that students in exclusively face to face courses and students in exclusively online courses tended to give higher marks to their programs than those students taking blended courses that combine face to face learning with online learning. The report suggests that there is something about the design, implementation or execution of blended learning that is leading to lower overall satisfaction among students across several metrics that were tracked. For those universities pursuing some form of blended learning, and the list is growing every day, the THE report provides a launching point for new conversations around what is working and what isn’t working on their campuses.

Don Gorges commented on this

__Excellent points, O’Neal, “Blended learning is in its early stages and measurement and analysis are key factors that can drive improvement.” _ Also shines a light on the importance of Student Survey question design and methodology _ perhaps useful data can be gained through a sequence of follow-up questions, seeking more than a 1-10 rating scale _ i.e. “Value for money” responses lack correlations to the variables of ‘mostly online’ Course design meeting students’ expectations. _You might find this related Globe&Mail article interesting, it reflects a positive view of the flexibility of hybrid blended and online learning _ http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/education/students-appreciate-flexibility-of-distance-learning/article32799209/

2016 11 15

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Jamie Way

We will work for toys,Christmas is coming up .

say hello hello hello to third person.

say hello hello hello to third person.

Susan Elsley on LinkedIn

Announcing a teaming up of two creative minds under the name Third Person. Jamie Way and Susan Elsley are spirited thinkers with years of big agency experience in Toronto. Sure, you can find a writer for this and a photographer for that, but there is a special magic that happens when you hire a creative team that allows two people to create a third person in the room. Ideas get bounced around that wouldn’t happen if the two people worked independently. So take the combination of a British guy that can draw, paint, photograph or film anything, and a girl that loves to break the rules and mess around with the alphabet, and you get a third person that doesn’t require an expensive lunch. Third Person takes on interesting projects for design houses, agencies and have their own set of clients. They can think it and they can produce it with the help of a talented collection of editors, designers, producers and musicians they have collaborated with along the way. They enjoy solving business problems in an unorthodox way using original images and modern day poetry. So look around the site and enjoy the new math; 1 + 1 = 3

2016 11 14

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Don Gorges likes this

(in collaboration with Dave Weissburg at Fidelity Labs)

They say “hindsight is 20/20”. If only you knew then what you know now, you would have sold that stock, ended that relationship, or taken that job offer in a snap. Of course the tricky part is being able to make those decisions in the present, but how do you do that without knowing what’s lurking around the corner? I want to argue that by making Futures Thinking a standard part of your thought process – both in your business and personal lives – you’ll be able to make better decisions in the face of uncertainty.

As a design strategist, I have helped design dozens of products and services. The process is always pretty similar – we invest a lot of time upfront to understand our users, generate insights about their needs, create and test a wide range of solutions to satisfy those needs, and then build a business model to bring the winning one(s) to market. It’s a process that is extremely well-suited to do what it was intended to do – creatively solve problems that our audience is facing today in a user-centric way. However, it doesn’t take into account that our users are evolving every day – much like you and I. I never thought twice about this until I did a project in partnership with the Institute for the Future this past summer and learned their Futures Thinking methodology. Rather than trying to predict the future, their methods help you create multiple possible scenarios for what the future might look like. They call it forecasting. As a result, like a weather forecast, you are able to prepare for a broad range of likely things on the horizon and take advantage of impactful opportunities while minimizing surprises. So how do Futures Thinking and Design Thinking compare and perhaps complement each other? And how can we use the two in tandem to get to better outcomes?

The two processes have some stark differences:

1.) The mix of diverging and converging: While both processes require a series of diverging and converging steps, Design Thinking ultimately converges to a concrete concept that is tested, finalized, and brought to market. Futures Thinking, on the other hand, yields a series of scenarios, which are meant to illustrate multiple options for what the future might be without defining an exact prediction. We can then design product concepts for any one of these future scenarios, meaning that the end-point of the Futures Thinking process can be seen as the starting point for the Design Thinking process – one can feed into the other.

2.) The goals and mindsets, which lead to very different outputs: Design Thinking aims to inspire us to create. The goals are products, services, and experiences for today’s world. It helps get to this goal and deal with its inherent ambiguity by relying on a mindset of optimistic confidence that we will ultimately get to the desired outcome. Futures Thinking, on the other hand, aims to inspire. The goal is to think bigger about opportunities we may (or may not) have in the coming years. It aims to inform organizational strategy for tomorrow and make it more robust for the uncertainty that lies ahead. At its core, the process embraces the inherent uncertainty that comes with this, fostering a mindset of pragmatic humility. 

3.) The timeline: Design Thinking focuses on creating for today’s world and the immediate future. As a result, the inspiration stage is usually focused on investigating the present and the immediate past only (a few years back). Futures Thinking aims to illuminate possibilities 10-15 years down the road. As a result, it requires us to look 10-15 years back in time to understand history in order to be able to trace the trajectory of what the implications of the past might be on the future.

4.) The system: Design Thinking, given its more immediate nature, generally only focuses on the more immediate factors relevant to the organization today – the people we’re designing for, our technological constraints, and our business needs. Given its more long-term nature, Futures Thinking embraces a much more systemic approach. On top of looking at the factors immediately relevant to today’s organizational context, it takes into account greater macro factors that may shape the organizational context in the coming years.

However, Futures Thinking also has some undeniable similarities to the Design Thinking.

1.) Inspirational Edges: Both processes look to the fringes as a source of inspiration. In Design Thinking this is done by looking at lead and lag users to expose user needs and analogous systems to show opportunity areas. In Futures Thinking this is done by looking at weak signals of change observed in today’s world and extrapolating what they might become in ten to fifteen years.

2.) People and Experiences: Both processes rely on personas and prototypes to bring abstract concepts to life. In Design Thinking this helps make user needs and product ideas tangible – this helps potential users react to concepts and provide useful feedback. In Futures Thinking this helps make abstract scenarios for what life might be like in the future tangible by putting real items from those worlds in front of business stakeholders.

We could discuss these (and other) similarities and differences for days, but the point is that both processes are valuable in their own right. One of my favorite quotes by Daniel Egger states, “The present creates value so that the future can exist… and the future offers a strategic north and new possible opportunities.” We need to be looking at both to optimize for success and find the alignment between the present and the future.

Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/i-believe-ina-differentinnovation-lab-daniel-egger

The greater question for us as design practitioners, then, is: what do we do about all of this? Can using Future Thinking in our design process benefit us? What will it help us accomplish?

I think that the ultimate benefit of blending the two methodologies is to design products that are more future-proof. Rather than designing something that today’s user will buy today, it helps us better understand what that user might want and need in the future and evolve with him/her. It’s kind of like starting a college savings plan for your newborn. It helps design for longer-lasting relationships with our users – a relationship based on our products and services rather than merely on our brand.

So how do we do it? One option is to commit to Future Thinking and engage in it regularly in parallel with our Design Thinking process – to always have an up-to-date set of possible scenarios for what our future will be 10-15 years from now and align our design initiatives with these visions. This is great, but we’re not all ready to take that leap yet. So in the meantime we can borrow some exercises from the Futures Thinking process and integrate them into our Design Thinking initiatives so start getting steeped in the methodology.

o Looking Back to Look Forward: In Design Thinking we are guided heavily by stories from our users – these are data points about the past. This Futures Thinking exercise can help connect the data points to uncover trajectories. It can help us understand users on a deeper level by seeing how their realities and behaviors have evolved (and how they might continue to evolve). It prompts us to ask questions like: What have been some of the most important trends in the domain/industry we’re designing in and which of them have most affected our user groups? How did these trends change user behaviors/preferences and what were the drivers behind these trends? What might be the next step for these trends if we were to extrapolate them into the future?

o Collecting and Clustering Signals: In Design Thinking look to “tail” users and analogous systems for insights and inspiration. This Futures Thinking exercise can help see how else we might look at what is happening at the “fringes” of our organizational context (in areas that might seem irrelevant at first) to better understand potential opportunity areas. It prompts us to ask questions like: What are some of the most creative, exciting, unusual things happening in the world at large today? What is driving these things to develop? Why are these interesting and what implications might they have in the future? How might they apply to the domain we’re designing in?

o Forecasting Two Curves: In Design Thinking we think about how insights from extreme users can translate to more mainstream user groups. This Futures Thinking exercise provides a structured approach to envision how seeds of change from today’s fringes might make their way into the mainstream and how, conversely, the elements from today’s mainstream might fall to obsolescence. It prompts us to ask questions like: What innovations might stem from today’s signals of change if/when they become mainstream? What needs to happen for the shift to occur and what might the transition look like? What elements of the domain we’re designing for & our user lives will be most transformed as a result? Which parts of today’s mainstream will still be around and which will go away?

o Revealing Unexpected Possibilities: In Design Thinking we generate a lot of observations, insights, and ideas throughout the divergent stages of the process. This Futures Thinking exercise provides a new “mash-up” framework to help make sense of these diverse elements and uncover new opportunity areas. It requires us to generate a lot (at least 50-100) signals of change that you’re seeing in today’s world. These can be news stories, emerging startups, or anything else concrete that you think might have implications for the future. It then prompts us to think about what interesting opportunities could exist at the intersection of various combinations of 2-3 of these signals. It prompts us to ask questions like: Which insights do we find the most intriguing (even if they appear completely unrelated)? What kinds of user needs could exist at the intersection of these insights if you combined them? Which user needs seem to be the most critical? What kinds of new products and experiences could exist to fill the intersection of these needs?

Futures Thinking can often seem nebulous and uncomfortable – much like Design Thinking did back when you were less familiar with it. I hope that this overview peaked your interest and made you see the value behind it. I also hope that it made you want to explore how Future Thinking might make you a better designer and strategist. Finally, I hope that this is just the beginning of a movement to bring the two disciplines closer together over the coming years and the start of a conversation around how we do so.

2016 11 14

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Brian Kenji Iwana and Seiichi Uchida at Kyushu University in Japan [-] have trained a deep neural network [machine-vision algorithm] to study book covers and determine the category of book they come from. “This paves the way for AI systems to design the covers themselves.”

_ hehehe _ Segue to Chip Kidd: Designing books is no laughing matter. OK, it is. _ https://www.ted.com/talks/chip_kidd_designing_books_is_no_laughing_matter_ok_it_is

You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but a neural network can

You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but a neural network can

technologyreview.com

A machine-vision algorithm can tell a book’s genre by looking at its cover. This paves the way for AI systems to design the covers themselves.

Today we get an answer thanks to the work of Brian Kenji Iwana and Seiichi Uchida at Kyushu University in Japan. These guys have trained a deep neural network to study book covers and determine the category of book they come from.

Their method is straightforward. Iwana and Uchida downloaded 137,788 unique book covers from Amazon.com along with the genre of book. There are 20 possible genres but where a book was listed in more than one category, the researchers used just the first.Next, the pair used 80 percent of the data set to train a neural network to recognize the genre by looking at the cover image.  Their neural network has four layers, each with up to 512 neurons, which together learn to recognize the correlation between cover design and genre. The pair used a further 10 percent of the dataset to validate the model and then tested the neural network on the final 10 percent to see how well it categorizes covers it has never seen.

The results make for interesting reading.

More on machine learning

2016 11 14

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Don Gorges commented on this

How are universities evolving to serve the needs of 21st-century learners?

How are universities evolving to serve the needs of 21st-century learners?

Ken Steele on LinkedIn

This week, Ken Steele speaks with 10 university presidents and 2 senior administrators about the ways in which universities are evolving to meet the needs of 21st Century Learners.

Don Gorges commented on this

__Well done, Ken. You will likely be posting your interview video to #OUF2016 twitter soon and I expect those students we see in the bkgrd, who attended OUF2016, could get valuable insights from these answers. _Since, by design, you needed to be brief, much of the conversation with each interviewee is on the cutting room floor. I imagine it might be interesting to each of these Presidents / Execs to be able to publish a full or lightly edited print transcript of their own responses on their University’s website – perhaps they would take the opportunity to frame these topics with their institution’s unique perspective.

Thanks Don. I did wonder about releasing the interviews individually, although it doesn’t really fit our podcast format. There aren’t enough hours in the day! I’ll certainly give it some thought…

2016 11 13

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Don Gorges commented on this

__The Modern Learning Platform – Founder’s Vision _ Howard Weiner of NobleStream with Phil Hill and Michael Feldstein from e-Literate, discuss their respective paths to being rational voices of EdTech in Higher Ed and explore all facets of the Learning Platform decision in context of the myriad of new technologies and teaching pedagogies reaching the space.

 

Don Gorges commented on this

__See how Phil and Michael’s view of Institutional priorities relates to Educause’s annual roundup of the most pressing issues in higher ed technology _ https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/10/student-success-pervades-top-it-issues-for-2017.aspx _ #1_Information security: 2_Student success and completion: Applying data and predictive analytics to improve student success and completion; 3_Data-informed decision making: Helping administrators, faculty and students use data 4_Strategic leadership: Promoting the role of IT leadership as a strategic partner with institutional leadership; 5_Sustainable funding: Developing funding models for IT that sustain core services, support innovation and enable growth; 6_Data management and governance: 7_Higher education affordability: Prioritizing IT investments and resources in the context of increasing demand and limited resources; 8_Sustainable staffing: in the face of shrinking or flatlining budgets; 9_Next-generation enterprise IT: and 10_Digital transformation of learning: Working with faculty and academic leadership in using technology for teaching and learning in innovative ways and to support the school’s mission.

2016 11 12

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Don Gorges likes this

Cengage Learning

Instructional Design 101 Part 1: What is Instructional Design?

The field of instructional design has gotten a lot of attention lately, especially in the world of higher education. But even some experienced instructional designers have a hard time explaining exactly what  they do. The Instructional Design 101 series will explore the basics of what instructional design is and how it can help colleges and universities better serve their students.

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Instructional Design 101 Part 2: Why Does Your Institution Need Instructional Design? - The Cengage Learning Blog

Instructional Design 101 Part 2: Why Does Your Institution Need Instructional Design? – The Cengage Learning Blog

blog.cengage.com

The field of instructional design has gotten a lot of attention lately, especially in the world of higher education. But even some experienced instructional designers have a hard time explaining exactly what it is they do. The first post of the Instructional Design 101 series gave a broad overview of what instructional design is. This post will explain exactly why it’s so valuable.

2016 11 12

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Don Gorges likes this

Open Educational Resources- The Technology

YouTube

Recording of the OER Technology colloquium with NobleStream’s Howard Weiner featuring Chief Product Officer of panOpen, Josh Mullineaux, who is taking us for a deep dive of the panOpen platform.

2016 11 12

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Don Gorges commented on this

Cable Green

Open Educational Resources (OER) - The Commonwealth Education Hub

Open Educational Resources (OER) – The Commonwealth Education Hub

thecommonwealth-educationhub.net

Policy Brief on Open Educational Resources (OER)

Executive summary: Open Educational Resources (OER) are educational materials that are freely available and can be legally used and modified by anyone. Properly leveraged, OER can help everyone in the world access free, high quality, learning materials. OER can help governments meet the aims set out in the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially with regard to SDG4: ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education, and promoting lifelong learning opportunities for all. This policy brief describes open educational resources, open licenses, open education licensing policies, and actions governments may take to support open education in their countries.

This policy brief has been written by Creative Commons with input from the Commonwealth of Learning and the Commonwealth Secretariat. It is posted here for comment and input prior to being finalised in December 2016. Comment may be sent by email to: eduhub@commonwealth.int . Kindly comment by 3 December 2016 either via the email address or the comment box at the bottom of this page.

Policy Brief on OERDownload the Policy Brief (updated on 19 November 2016) on OER
(PDF | DOCX | RTF | ODT)

 

Don Gorges commented on this

__Policy Brief on Open Educational Resources is aimed at Education policy makers and planners in government and institutions – the recommendation is broken down into 10 points, #1. Foster awareness and promote the use of OER – to #10. Encourage the open licensing of educational materials produced with public funds. There currently is a low level of awareness and experience using OER, it is incumbent on policy makers to gain an expertise in both the pros and the cons to be able to consider an Open education licensing policy that publicly funded education resources (i.e. paid for by taxpayers’ money) should be openly licensed by default.

2016 11 11

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Naza Djafarova

We [ChangSchool] are creating games in 3 months. Check our simulation game:

Therapeutic Communication and Mental Health Assessment Demo

Don Gorges commented on this

__Very impressive simulation game example, Naza. _ Readers, to get the most from this short demo, be prepared to pause and read the text frames like slides. Really interesting.

Making Video Games for Higher Ed Requires Major Investment. Is It Worth It? (EdSurge News)

Making Video Games for Higher Ed Requires Major Investment. Is It Worth It? (EdSurge News)

edsurge.com

A majority of young adults already play video games, so using them in courses seems like a natural fit. But building World of Warcraft or a similar blockbuster game requires massive production teams and millions of dollars. For higher education, with smaller potential audiences and student outcomes at stake, companies are debating whether return on investment is there for game-based learning experiences.

2016 11 11

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Don Gorges commented on this

__”In 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada amended the country’s copyright law, expanding its “fair-dealing” provision for the purposes of education, parody, and satire. As a result of the way many educational institutions have defined the new fair dealing rules, schools are paying less money to copyright holders. Roanie Levy, Access Copyright’s executive director, says the organization’s 2017 payout will be 80 per cent less than it distributed in 2013 ” __

Access Copyright projecting 55 per cent drop in 2017 royalties | Quill and Quire

quillandquire.com

Access Copyright is warning creators and publishers to brace for a significant decrease in their royalty payments next year.

The non-profit organization, which collects revenues on behalf of Canadian copyright holders, estimates the amount it pays to creators to drop to $5 million in 2017, from $11 million this year – a 55 per cent decrease that is being directly attributed to a reduction in revenue from the educational sector.

Roanie Levy, Access Copyright’s executive director, expects educational publishers and content creators, such as authors, across the board will be affected most by the reduction. “When you consider the scope and size of these industries, and these businesses, and the income of creators, you quickly see how damaging this kind of decline is,” she says. “It’s a death by a thousand cuts.” Although Levy refers to the current situation as an “impasse,” she says Access Copyright is working with the educational sector to better understand its needs, and is testing out a transactional model that could potentially replace the traditional blanket licence: “What is absolutely critical for us is that we develop something that meets the needs of the educational institutions.”

2016 11 10

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Don Gorges likes this

Students appreciate flexibility of distance learning

Students appreciate flexibility of distance learning

theglobeandmail.com
Colleges and universities are moving more and more into online and blended hybrid deliveries for postsecondary programs, in addition to what they have traditionally offered in continuing education online. Allison Pillwein, a 23-year-old Niagara College student, is a fan of online learning. Currently in her first year of a social service worker program, Ms. Pillwein likes that many of her lecture courses are online hybrids – meaning that part of the delivery is online and part is face-to-face in class – such as the abnormal psychology course she elected to take this fall.

“Hybrid learning gives us the advantage of having technology available to learn in the way that we’ve grown used to,” says Ms. Pillwein, who is also a Brock University graduate. “In the abnormal psychology course, the online component is mainly tests and quizzes that you can do in your own time. I’ve found that suits my learning style more, as opposed to doing a test in class where you’d have to memorize a lot of terms and concepts.”

Ms. Pillwein also likes that the professor uploads all of her PowerPoint presentations for students to access and review. She feels that helps get the material embedded in her brain more than writing things down word for word during the lecture.

“Being online allows you a lot of flexibility in how you choose to learn,” Ms. Pillwein says. “You can tweak how you study and how you learn the material rather than being forced to do it only one way in the classroom session.”

[-]

Patrick Lyons, director of teaching and learning services at Carleton University in Ottawa, visualizes online learning taking many different forms, presenting all kinds of opportunities that could not be delivered any other way. Carleton has a long history offering distance learning, first broadcasting courses on a local cable TV channel in 1978 and then offering the world’s first video podcast of a university credit course in 2006. Currently, as many as one-third of all Carleton students register and complete an online course in a given year.

“If you think broadly and creatively, you can have wonderfully rich online activities,” says Mr. Lyons. “The tools are astounding right now. We’ve had instructors facilitate a completely online language course in a 3-D environment where they were meeting in a virtual space as avatars. We’ve had courses featuring engaging short lectures from amazing people who might otherwise be difficult to bring into a classroom, such as a supreme court justice, an RCMP officer and a practising physician.”

Mr. Lyons says he has watched some instructors at Carleton hold more engaging seminars online with richer communications than he has seen in face-to-face seminars. One example he gives is a graduate course with a small class of about 30 students who meet online at the same time.

“In some ways it mirrors a face-to-face seminar graduate course where you’d have a live discussion going back and forth, but you’re doing this online with 30 people spread out around the world,” says Mr. Lyons. “And because of the technology, they’re able to break out into groups and have these small private discussions between three and four people and then bring that back to class. The wealth of ideas and the rich diversity that they’re bringing are so different compared with a face-to-face classroom environment. Online learning can absolutely bring us new opportunities to connect people who may not be easily connected, and in areas where face-to-face teaching may not be the best choice.”

2016 11 11

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Don Gorges likes this

Leonard Cohen and the Strawberry.

Leonard Cohen and the Strawberry.

Ian Mirlin on LinkedIn

Leonard Cohen passed away last night.

No other could climb so high up the ladder, bring down such

profound ideas and then crystallize them into popular music.

The amount of translation that involves can be only be done by the most evolved of souls.

I once asked my copy class at OCADU to revisit a common fruit or vegetable and to examine their selection to find a fresh insight.

A young lady working with a strawberry, brilliantly observed: ‘A strawberry is the only fruit that has the courage to wear its seeds on the outside’.

I think of the strawberry today.

Such was the transparent honesty of Leonard Cohen as a poet, a novelist, a songwriter

and as a human being.

2016 11 11

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Don Gorges likes this

Andrew Shortt

If you want to be a great copywriter, or if you want the copywriters in your agency to be great writers, have them go to Neil French’s website and rewrite every ad, by hand.

the NEIL FRENCH site

the NEIL FRENCH site

neilfrench.com

2016 11 11

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Don Gorges commented on this

__”We like the things that we like as human beings, we like feelings, we like experiences . . . and whatever products gets us close to that, that’s the product we go with . . . products that have the user experience at their very core . . . if anyone has a Design Thinking approach or mindset, you look at the world and go, why does it work like this when we could redesign this and make it so much better . . . “

design-is-future-film

Design Is Future Film

YouTube

This film is the result of the last edition of ‘Design is Future congresstival’ held at Disseny Hub Barcelona from 6 to 8 June during the Barcelona Design Week. It showcases the main highlights and strong ideas from the 15 speakers that took part in the Design is Future 2016, as well as from the presenter and curators of the event.

They all share with the audience their main insights about the key role of design while explaining how it helps professionals, businesses and society to be more innovative and sustainable.

This film is an idea by Toormix and BCD Barcelona Centre de Disseny for the Barcelona Design Week 2016. Directed by Laura Sans with the support of Fabrica.

2016 11 11

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Dr. Terry Anderson’s three-part series, Three Pillars of Educational Technology, covers Learning Management Systems, Social Media, and Personal Learning Environments, and how they might best be used for enhanced teaching and learning. _ 3 parts via Contact Northhttp://teachonline.ca/sites/default/files/tools-trends/downloads/cn-three_pillars_part_1.pdf _ http://teachonline.ca/sites/default/files/tools-trends/downloads/cn-three_pillars_part_2.pdf _ http://teachonline.ca/sites/default/files/tools-trends/downloads/cn-three_pillars_part_3.pdf

2016 11 09

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Third-party published content is regularly shared by 38% of business professionals without consideration of copyright, despite the acknowledgement of serious risks and implications of copyright infringement by 74% of those business professionals. _ http://storage.pardot.com/37852/179398/2016_Information_Seeking__Consumption_and_Use_Report_NA_EU.pdf _ Information Seeking Consumption and Use Report – Copyright Clearance Center

Content Sharing and Consumption on the Rise, Copyright Awareness at a Low

Content sharing is essential in business today, the study shows, as it fosters collaboration and speeds up innovation.

  • 97% of respondents share content with their team monthly, and 38% say that they forward information without thinking about copyright issues.
    • 26% of executives share content without thinking about copyright.
  • More than one-third (36%) of all shared information is externally published, down from 41% in 2013.
    • 69% share information with clients, 68% share with business partners, and 65% share content with colleagues in international locations.
  • Since 2013, the number of instances of content sharing (forwarding work-related information such as articles, pictures, and video clips) has dropped from seven times a week to five, while the number of people the content is shared with has declined from eleven to an average of nine people a week.

Shifts in Sharing Methods

Although email is still the most frequent means of sharing information, users are increasingly choosing to make information available to colleagues through shared network drives and intranet postings as well as collaboration tools such as Microsoft SharePoint, Dropbox and CRM systems.

  • Email remains the most widely used tool for information sharing; 66% of respondents send email attachments, 51% share links and 39% paste text into an email.
    • Sharing content in email attachments has dropped since 2013, from 87% of respondents to 66%.
  • Collaboration tools made significant gains in popularity, with 24% of respondents reporting use versus only 11% in 2011.

Executives Share a High Volume of Content, Much of it from Third Party Sources

Executives have a greater appetite for sharing content than middle management and individual contributors, per the survey. Executives share more regularly (nearly seven times per week), share with more people each time (12), and are more likely to share information published by third parties (41%) than internal information or material produced by colleagues within the company.

In competitive, mission-critical or time-critical situations, nearly a third of executives (73%) said they will forward relevant information that will give their organization the competitive edge.

“Protecting intellectual property rights is everyone’s responsibility – knowledge workers, information managers and executives. A solid understanding of what copyright infringement constitutes is critical,” said Jo McShea, VP & Lead Analyst, Outsell. “The potential for exposure to copyright abuse is proliferating. Data from our study indicates more than a third of shared content is from external sources, coupled with a broader base of people with whom information is shared and growing usage of new methods of sharing information such as collaboration networks.”

“It’s vital for organizations to adjust for trends in workflow patterns and to ensure that their copyright policies and educational measures are up to standards to mitigate risk,” said Gretchen Gasser-Ellis, Senior Vice President, Product and Operations, CCC. “Those parties responsible for copyright adherence have their hands full to make sure their organizations’ copyright policies and employee training curriculum consider workflow trends, sharing methods and behavioral nuances related to the user’s role, industry, or geography.”

2016 11 09

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Don Gorges likes this

Amanda Murray

Some of our best and brightest are on the Neo team here at Pearson!

Employee Engagement Soars In Pearson's Interactive Intranet

Employee Engagement Soars In Pearson’s Interactive Intranet

jivesoftware.com

For Pearson’s 40,000-strong workforce, a Jive-powered interactive intranet has become the hub and the heart of company culture.

Engaging a global workforce isn’t easy when all you have is traditional one-way tools like static intranets and email. That’s why Pearson turned to Jive, creating a fully interactive intranet and collaborative hub the company calls “Neo.” It’s become the center of company culture, a place for learning, news and open, two-way dialogue between executives and employees. “It’s really transformed how people feel about working at Pearson,” says Global Community Manager Kim England. And she says things got even better when Pearson moved from a hosted deployment to Jive in the cloud, delivering all the latest and greatest Jive enhancements in regular automatic upgrades.

2016 11 08

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Excellent research / reporting by Heather McCabe and Emi Sasagawa of UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology _

Open textbooks save UBC Math students up to $1,000,000 this year

Open textbooks save UBC Math students up to $1,000,000 this year

flexible.learning.ubc.ca

In an effort to customize materials for their courses and save students money on rising textbook fees, instructors in the Math department at UBC have adopted open or freely accessible textbooks in all first-year courses and most second-year courses.

In addition to the open or freely available textbooks, faculty members use a number of other freely accessible or open resources, such as WeBWorK, a randomized online homework software that automatically grades student work; the Math Exam/Education Resources wiki with past exams and worked out solutions and videos; and course wiki pages which host additional resources. In some cases, students have helped with the production of the online textbooks written by faculty, and contributed to WeBWorK problems and the course wiki pages.
Faculty members in Math who have written their own online textbooks say that they plan to continue to refine them or add features to them to make them more interactive and appealing for students to use.

2016 11 08

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Z-Degree curious? Tidewater Community College / Lumen Learning “Z-Degree” not found in search _ Search Word and Design Marks on US Trademark Electronic Search System (TESS) _ i.e. see _ NANODEGREE _

Why Udacity and EdX Want to Trademark the Degrees of the Future—and What’s at Stake for Students (EdSurge News)

Why Udacity and EdX Want to Trademark the Degrees of the Future—and What’s at Stake for Students (EdSurge News)

edsurge.com

No one owns the term “master’s degree.” But upstart education providers dream of getting a lock on the words for the next generation of online graduate certifications. Their strategy says a lot about how today’s online programs differ from those in the past (Hint: duration and price are just one part of that).

Udacity won a trademark for Nanodegree last year. And in April, the nonprofit edX, founded by MIT and Harvard University to deliver online courses by a consortium of colleges, applied for a trademark on the word MicroMasters. And MicroDegree? Yep, that’s trademarked too, by yet another company.

Sean Gallagher, chief strategy officer at Northeastern University’s Global Network, picked up on this trend recently and wondered what’s going on. He knows the space well, since he literally wrote the book on “ The Future of University Credentials.” And he noticed that at least one key player can’t seem to decide whether it wants its new degrees to be universal or proprietary.

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2016 11 06

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Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts and Links October 29 to November 6

Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts and Links October 29 to November 6

dongorges.wordpress.com

Topics – Perspectives – Sectors : Open Design Visual Communications Creative Marketing Education

Don Gorges commented on this

__Issues in Postsecondary Education in Canada _ Funding Cuts: Postsecondary education and tuition fees are publicly regulated, our colleges and universities are public institutions; however, public funding currently accounts for less than 49 percent of university and college operating funds, down from 77 percent just 20 years ago. In recent decades, various governments have made the political choice to claw back public funding for post-secondary education and download these costs onto students and their families through tuition fees. The Education Sector human resources cost increases = Tuition and Fees increases. The Creative Sector human resources cost increases = Textbook price increases. The Open Educational Resources OER Movement wages war against the Creative Sector’s Textbooks & Educational Resources pricing.

__Design Is Future Film showcases the main highlights and strong ideas from the 15 speakers that took part in the Design is Future 2016. . . “We like the things that we like. . . and, as human beings, we like feelings, we like experiences . . . and whatever products gets us close to that, that’s the product we go with . . . products that have the user experience at their very core . . . if anyone has a Design Thinking approach or mindset, you look at the world and go, why does it work like this when we could redesign this and make it so much better . . . ” _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zodT9bCdIiI&feature=youtu.be _

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts and Links October 29 to November 6

 

Topics – Perspectives – Sectors :

Open  Design  Visual  Communications  Creative  Marketing  Education

Don Gorges

Don Gorges

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Education Costs: Tuition & Fees and Educational Resources i.e. Books-Supplies, Technology Devices, Software/Platforms and Connectivity.
The focus of attention is on costs of Tuition and Textbooks.
The Education Sector human resources cost increases = Tuition and Fees increases
The Creative Sector human resources cost increases = Textbook price increases
The Open Educational Resources Movement wages war against the Creative Sector’s Textbooks & Educational Resources pricing.
People in the Open Educational Resources Movement earn their living from within the Education Sector [the human resources cost driving Tuition and Fees increases].
To set priorities and focus on a range of solutions, seek a clear understanding of the Costs, Financial Aid Grants/Loans, financial literacy, decision processes and purchasing behaviours that have an impact students’ success.

The relative impact of Tuition and Textbook costs via found Graphics

canadian-federation-of-students-national-day-of-action-2percentages-of-total-costs-in-college-board-student-budget
average-tuition-across-canada
flvc-student-survey-and-oregon-state-student-survey

 

The Issues stated by Canadian Federation of Students, National Day of Action on November 2

Postsecondary Education in Canada

Funding Cuts

Postsecondary education and tuition fees are publicly regulated, our colleges and universities are public institutions; however, public funding currently accounts for less than 49 percent of university and college operating funds, down from 77 percent just 20 years ago. In recent decades, various governments have made the political choice to claw back public funding for post-secondary education and download these costs onto students and their families through tuition fees.

Tuition Fees

Dramatic tuition fee increases are the direct result of cuts to public funding for postsecondary education by the federal and provincial governments. In the past 25 years, average tuition fees in Canada have increased by more than 137 percent.To justify these increases, in recent years, governments and post-secondary institutions across the country have colluded to create a narrative that post-secondary education is a privilege and a personal benefit that students and their families should have to pay for. We know that this “user-fee” model of post-secondary education benefits the wealthy, with 60 percent of post-secondary students today coming from the two highest income quintiles. The upfront cost of college and university education is blocking students from low and middle-income families from accessing higher education and skills training.

Student Debt

Rising tuition fees and the reliance on loan-based financial assistance have pushed student debt to historic levels. Today, students on average graduate with over $28,000 of education-related debt after an undergraduate degree and the amount owed to the Canada Student Loan Program is over $19 billion and is increasing by nearly $1 million per day.

Low and middle-income students who are forced to take out student loans end up paying more for their education as they must repay both tuition fees and the accumulated interest on their public and private student loans. These large levels of debt impact the life decisions students make for years to come.

Students are mobilizing to fight back and advocate for our vision of post-secondary education in Canada. We know that public education is a public good that society benefits from as a whole and it must be funded as such. Education is a right of us all not a privilege of a few.

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Canadian university report

Paying for it

The key is to find ways to finance your education and graduate with the smallest amount of debt.

Here are the costs you can expect across Canada.

Paul Attfield, CAITLIN HAVLAK   The Globe and Mail : Thursday, Nov. 03, 2016

Tuition is just the start. Add in the price of student housing, which varies depending on the university, books and school supplies, food and recreation, a phone plan and return trips home, and the cost of university soon adds up exponentially.

And graduating Canadian students carry an average debt burden of about $27,000, according to the 2015 graduating student survey by the Canadian University Survey Consortium, which takes on average 10 years to pay back, according to the Canada Student Loan program.

But there are a few options to help students try to minimize the amount of debt they carry with them after graduating.    . . .

 

2016 11 06

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Baird Whelan

3 Ways to Prove the ROI in Open Educational Resources EdTech Magazine: Focus on Higher Education – 20h ago

3 Ways to Prove the ROI in Open Educational Resources

3 Ways to Prove the ROI in Open Educational Resources

edtechmagazine.com

There are many sources pointing to the savings OER provides students, but how do these savings impact the university’s bottom line? With limited resources, there are many valuable initiatives every year that just don’t make the cut. But OER adoption is a worthy initiative for allocation of university resources, and here’s why:

more > . . .

Thanks Baird. Tara Lifland makes good points about potential returns but could expand on Investment issues. A couple of ROI related articles: INTRO INcreased Tuition Revenue through OER model _http://epaa.asu.edu/ojs/article/view/1828/1763_ AND _ Defining Digital Courseware’s ROI in Terms of Student Success _https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-07-07-defining-digital-courseware-s-roi-in-terms-of-student-success_

2016 11 05

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__”Z-Degree” curious? Tidewater Community College / Lumen Learning “Z-Degree” not found _ Search Word and Design Marks on US Trademark Electronic Search System (TESS) _ i.e. see _ NANODEGREE _ https://www.uspto.gov/trademarks-application-process/search-trademark-database

Why Udacity and EdX Want to Trademark the Degrees of the Future—and What’s at Stake for Students (EdSurge News)

Why Udacity and EdX Want to Trademark the Degrees of the Future—and What’s at Stake for Students (EdSurge News)

edsurge.com

No one owns the term “master’s degree.” But upstart education providers dream of getting a lock on the words for the next generation of online graduate certifications. Their strategy says a lot about how today’s online programs differ from those in the past (Hint: duration and price are just one part of that).

Udacity won a trademark for Nanodegree last year. And in April, the nonprofit edX, founded by MIT and Harvard University to deliver online courses by a consortium of colleges, applied for a trademark on the word MicroMasters. And MicroDegree? Yep, that’s trademarked too, by yet another company.

more > . . .

2016 11 06

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__starring Robin DeRosa David Wiley Alan Levine

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Tweets by @DonGorges

 

 

2016 11 06

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__These 4 organizations have jointly pledged to only use the CC BY license [and not SA ND and NC licenses] when producing their open textbooks and other OER _ BCcampus | Open Textbook Network | The Rebus Community for Open Textbook Creation | Lumen Learning __

Open Textbook Community Advocates CC BY License for Open Textbooks

open.bccampus.ca

We, the undersigned, are active in the creation, dissemination, and adoption of Open Textbooks and Open Educational Resources (OER) throughout the world. Our projects, collectively, have involved hundreds of textbooks, thousands of OER, and millions of students. We believe the most appropriate license for open textbooks is the Creative Commons Attribution International (CC BY) license*.

Our organizations share a mission to foster a vibrant OER ecosystem in which anyone can exercise the “5Rs” legal rights to retain, reuse, revise, remix and redistribute open textbooks and other OER. The CC BY license makes it easier for all of us to achieve our objective: a world where open textbooks and OER can be easily remixed to meet local education needs.

This is why we believe that the CC-BY license is the ideal Creative Commons license for open textbooks:

more > . . .

Don Gorges

__BCcampus library of open textbooks are licensed CC BY and CC BY SA [perhaps others too] so this is a forward looking pledge. Wonder if OpenStax has commented on their intentions

2016 11 05

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Don Gorges

__FutuOER A collection of authors publications’ re: The Future of Open Educational Resources _ http //www.futuoer.org/

  1. Don Gorges

__Found several of these interesting, marked them with _*_ but start with Downes __ A Letter from 2036 – David Kernohan, Building the Open Future of Education – Mary Lou Forward, Open Education Consortium, The OER Research Themes of the Future – Martin Weller & Patrick McAndrew, _*_From Open Education to Open Science – Willem van Valkenburg [US / Europe Strategies], The Future of OER – TJ Bliss, A University of Open – Paul Stacey, Wither Open Educational Resources in 2036? – Marshall (Mike) Smith, _*_Mapping Unbundled Open Education Resources: Pathways Through the Chaos – Karen E. Willcox and Luwen Huang, Future of Open Education at Community Colleges – Una Daly, Dream A Little – Lorna M. Campbell, _*_2036: The Evolutionary Revolution of Open Education Realized – Catherine Casserly, Universal Education Realized – Cable Green, _*_Open Learning in the Future – Stephen Downes, The Price of Freedom: Open Education and the Tragedy of the Commons – Andy Lane,

2016 11 05

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Michael Feldstein 6 Short Videos – McGraw-Hill Education, Adaptive Learning, e-Literate TV _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6aYR0uCe9o&index=1&list=PLb2UcU-aVjN2aPSmGKILK2GHh6MgGswM9

mcgraw-hill-education-adaptive-learning-e-literate-tv-videos

2016 11 05

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Don Gorges commented on this

__”Innovation is clearly on the federal government’s agenda and of big interest to universities as they try to keep pace with rapid changes in society and the economy, while staying responsive to government funding priorities and continuing to meet the needs of their students, faculty and the wider community.” __

Six strategies for Canadian universities to foster innovation | University Affairs

Six strategies for Canadian universities to foster innovation | University Affairs

universityaffairs.ca

Experts from within and outside of academia expound on what role universities can play to further the innovation agenda.

By MOIRA MACDONALD | November 2, 2016

The buzzword “innovation” might perk you up – or make your eyes roll. Regardless of how the term sits with you, innovation is clearly on the federal government’s agenda and of big interest to universities as they try to keep pace with rapid changes in society and the economy, while staying responsive to government funding priorities and continuing to meet the needs of their students, faculty and the wider community.

With the federal government grappling with weak economic growth and working on crafting a new “innovation agenda,” (PDF) we asked six experts inside and outside the academy what role they think universities should play in fostering greater innovation in Canada. Their innovation definitions differ in their wording, but are variations on the theme that innovation is not about inventions, per se, but about the novel use of inventions and technologies that lead to transformative new or improved services, products and processes. Universities already make substantial contributions through their teaching, learning and research functions, and have at least some role to play in the innovation ecosystem, they agree, but how far that should go and in which ways yielded intriguing ideas from each of them.

more  . . .

2016 11 02

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Don Gorges likes this

Heather Strelecki

Design Census 2016

Design Census 2016

designcensus.org

Google and AIGA are pleased to announce the first annual Design Census—an open and collaborative resource for understanding the complex economic, social, and cultural factors shaping the design practice today. It is free and open to everyone, and its goal is to empower the design community to take charge of its professional development and happiness.

2016 11 03

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2016 11 02

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Don Gorges commented on this

__The PG-13 Reporters Covering an R-Rated Election_ Article via NYT _ http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/02/us/politics/scholastic-reporting-campaign.html?_r=0  ___ Scholastic has been providing child-friendly election coverage to teachers and classrooms for nearly a century, starting with the 1924 race between Calvin Coolidge and John W. Davis. It introduced its children’s press corps program in 2000, and for the last five presidential elections, Scholastic has sent precocious young political reporters to cover rallies, debates and stump speeches around the country.

2016 11 01

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Don Gorges commented on this

__2 recently established Syllabus Databases; Open Syllabus Explorer, Open Syllabus Project OSP, For now, there are limitations to these databases. They hold just a fraction of the estimated 80 million to 120 million syllabuses in the U.S. because at present they can only access syllabuses posted on public websites. Those stored in a school’s learning management system, for instance, aren’t accessible. Although a search can show which textbooks are most widely used in a particular field, the results can’t be filtered by subfields. _

Syllabus Databases Assist Course Creators

thecite.blogspot.ca

When faculty start developing new courses, they often want to know how other professors have structured similar courses and what textbooks they’re using. Likewise, textbook authors are keen to find out who has adopted their works for classes.

The Open Syllabus Project (OSP), a new database with three million course syllabuses, is designed to help both groups, and possibly also aid textbook publishers to better understand the ways in which faculty use course materials for teaching. OSP, set to open in January 2017, isn’t the first of its kind, according to an article in Nature, but it will be the largest to date.

Another database, Open Syllabus Explorer, launched in early 2016 with plans to expand its inventory next year to three million syllabuses cross-referenced with 150 million texts. Both databases can be searched in a number of ways: by academic field, textbook author, institution, and other criteria.

2016 11 02

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Canadian Federation of Students – National Day of Action on November 2 _ http://www.cfs-fcee.ca/ _ Live via Twitter _ https://twitter.com/hashtag/alloutnov2 _ Issues in Postsecondary Education in Canada – Public Funding Cuts & Tuition Increases & Student Debt _ https://lnkd.in/eZsUeAU

 

__Students are mobilizing across the country for our vision for post-secondary education in Canada. Canadian Federation of Students – National Day of Action on November 2 – Issues in Postsecondary Education in Canada – Public Funding Cuts & Tuition Increases & Student Debt _ http://www.cfs-fcee.ca/the_issues _

2016 11 02

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Don Gorges commented on this

Baird Whelan

Graphic design legend Milton Glaser dispels a universal misunderstanding of design and art — “Design is the process of going from an existing condition to a preferred one,” said the 2010 National Medal of Arts recipient.

“Design has nothing to do with art”: Design legend Milton Glaser dispels a universal misunderstanding

“Design has nothing to do with art”: Design legend Milton Glaser dispels a universal misunderstanding

qz.com

Design is not art. It’s a distinction understood by practicing designers, but it still eludes many. In an Oct. 29 talk at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, the 87-year-old graphic design legend Milton Glaser gave the best definition of the practice of design.

“Design is the process of going from an existing condition to a preferred one,” said the 2010 National Medal of Arts recipient. “Observe that there’s no relationship to art.”

This confusion is not just a matter of semantics. In businesses, schools, offices, even newspapers, design is often associated with the art department. That’s a fundamental misunderstanding of the aim of design. When art and design are confused, the designers’ domain becomes limited to style and appearance.

__Thanks Baird, it’s good to clarify any misunderstanding and promote greater awareness of the role and purpose of design. Many are aware of IBM’s transformation as a Design driven company and may enjoy this HOW podcast interview with Doug Powell at IBM Design – http://www.howdesign.com/how-design-live-podcast/doug-powell-future-of-design/_ Episode #28: Doug Powell on the Future of Design

2016 10 31

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Textbooks and Tuition up about 200% over 20 years, Mark Perry’s Chart of the Day III Aug 16 2016 via AEI – Carpe Diem Blog _ http://www.aei.org/publication/tuesday-evening-links-7/ _ [AEI’s Graphics by Olivier Ballou]

2016 10 31

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Don Gorges commented on this

__As a good example of Faculty offering Students cost saving options by modifying assessments to suit multiple resources/editions. Ohio State University economics professor, Lucia Dunn, said she allows students to use [lower cost] older editions of textbooks instead of newer ones, and provides students with chapter assignments to accompany it. __

Textbooks: Prices are rising, but students aren’t paying

Textbooks: Prices are rising, but students aren’t paying

thelantern.com

Kathy Smith, manager of Barnes & Noble at Ohio State, said the prices of textbooks at OSU are consistent with the prices of similar items at other universities. Book prices themselves are set by publishers, who sell to the bookstore at a fixed cost regardless of the quantity purchased, she said. Barnes & Noble then adds an “industry-standard margin” on top of this price to cover its costs of doing business.

Lucia Dunn, an economics professor, said publishers release new editions of textbooks too frequently, which drives up prices. Dunn specifically mentioned a representative from McGraw-Hill who once told her, if possible, publishers aim to revise books every 18 months.

“They have got the authors of these textbooks who are working on these books constantly updating it, when, in fact, there is no need to change the textbook in some fundamental areas, like economics, every 18 months,” Dunn said. “The laws of supply and demand don’t change every 18 months.”

more  . . .

2016 10 31

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Don Gorges commented on this

__ Coursera Introducing Monthly Subscriptions for Specializations – Pay $39 to $89 per month for the time you actually spend learning. With all courses in subscription-based Specializations running at least monthly, you can complete a Specialization in as little as a month (if, for example, you’re already familiar with some of the material), or over several months (if the topic is completely new to you). __

Introducing Subscriptions for Specializations

coursera.tumblr.com
By Tom Willerer, Chief Product Officer of Coursera

At Coursera, we believe education is a lifelong pursuit, and we want to empower you to achieve your goals throughout your life and career. We’re continually working to improve our courses and platform to give you access to relevant content, and to help you learn more efficiently and effectively.

Today, we’re excited to announce Specialization subscriptions – a new payment model that allows you to purchase access to all content in a Specialization on a month-by-month or annual basis, so that you’re paying only for the amount of time you need to learn the material and earn your Certificate.

You can now subscribe to some Specializations on Coursera for a monthly fee rather than paying up front for an entire course or Specialization, and this payment model will be rolled out to many of our most popular Specializations over the coming months. Subscriptions are typically priced from $39 to $89 per month for access to one Specialization, with no long-term commitment required. Subscribing to a Specialization gives you access to all content in every course in the Specialization for as long as your subscription is active. Based on the completion times that we typically see for our most popular Specializations, the subscription model has the potential to reduce costs for many learners.

2016 10 30

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Short videos by each CEO help describe important role/use of design – “a way to translate your ideals and you values into something people can touch and see and hold,”

Beau's Brewery CEO/Co-Founder & Tangerine President/CEO Named Canada’s DesignThinkers of the Year

Beau’s Brewery CEO/Co-Founder & Tangerine President/CEO Named Canada’s DesignThinkers of the Year

rgd.ca 

In its fourth year, the DesignThinker of the Year Award recognizes Canadian corporate leaders who use design and innovation to solve business problems and drive growth. Past recipients are Larry Rosen, CEO of Harry Rosen Inc.; David Labistour, president and CEO of MEC; Michael Emory, president and CEO of Allied Properties REIT; and Stephen Alexander, founder of Cumbrae’s.

2016 10 28

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Don Gorges commented on this

__This campaign raising awareness that Free Open Textbooks are a cost-saving option is an important initiative. However, Rory McGreal is misleading readers about the profitability of educational publishers – research will find they are making very little, if any, profits. Also worth noting that it’s BCcampus policy to “keep each textbook static”, i.e. not to update the open textbooks in their library – “This can be disruptive to faculty and students currently using the textbook” _https://lnkd.in/edGmXxm. __ https://lnkd.in/etF3sWK

Cash-strapped Alberta students leading a push for ‘open textbooks’ | Metro News

Cash-strapped Alberta students leading a push for ‘open textbooks’ | Metro News

metronews.ca

Representatives from five schools across province launched the #textbookbrokeAB campaign to showcase the money students spend on books.

With students facing a bigger financial crunch than ever, a group of Alberta students are taking aim at one of their biggest money sinks: textbooks.

Representatives from five schools across Alberta launched the #textbookbrokeAB campaign this fall to showcase the amount of money students are spending on books.

Instead, they want schools to look more seriously at open source textbooks, or books that have been published and licensed to be used by anyone.

It’s an idea gaining momentum in other places, including B.C.

more  . . .

2016 10 27

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Don Gorges

__Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts & Links October 24 to October 29 _ Topics – Perspectives – Sectors : Open Design Visual Communications Creative Marketing Education __

Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts & Links October 24 to October 29

Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts & Links October 24 to October 29

dongorges.wordpress.com

2016 10 29

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Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts & Links October 24 to October 29

Topics – Perspectives – Sectors :

Open  Design  Visual  Communications  Creative  Marketing  Education

Don Gorges

Don Gorges

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Don Gorges commented on this

__BMO Education and Training 2016 Report – US only _  “roughly $1.37 trillion will be spent on educational services in the U.S. in 2016. We project that the education industry will grow at roughly a 2.9% annual rate through 2021, when total spending is expected to reach roughly $1.58 trillion.”

U.S. Postsecondary Instructional Materials Market
A number of different data sources estimate the postsecondary instructional materials market size. GSV estimates that just over $23 billion was spent in the U.S. in 2015 and forecasts roughly a 4% CAGR increase to $27.7 billion in 2020. The 2015 estimate comprises:
• Print textbooks ($12.4 billion expected to increase 3% CAGR to $14.4 billion in 2020);
• Print supplemental materials ($5.3 billion expected to increase 3% CAGR to $6.2 billion in 2020);
• Digital textbooks ($3.7 billion expected to increase 6% CAGR to $5 billion in 2020); and
• Digital supplemental materials ($1.6 billion expected to increase 6% CAGR to $2.1 billion in 2020).

2016 10 29

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Don Gorges commented on this

__David Wiley gives notes to Nicole Allen / Ethan Senack on Underselling Open & The Problem with Cost Framing __ “Not only does cost framing cause people to ignore what is most powerful about open, but it also exposes open to attack by publishers. If open is simply a matter of cost, there are ways publishers can counter the “threat” of open by lowering their costs or offering discounts. [so] how should we talk about it? – My current best answer is what I call the possible/permitted framing.”

Underselling Open: The Problem with Cost Framing _ http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/4774

Advocate for open education

ACCESS DENIED:

The New Face of the Textbook Monopoly

2016 10 27

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Don Gorges commented on this

__It’s been some time since Audrey Watters’ thinking resonated with me and I haven’t read her blog recently, though she certainly can craft an engaging story

(This Is Not a Morphology of) The Monsters of Education Technology

(This Is Not a Morphology of) The Monsters of Education Technology

hackeducation.com
This talk was presented at ETUG’s Fall Workshop in Vancouver, BC. on 28 Oct 2016
“As Cassandra, I must warn you that education technology’s monstrosity will bring about our doom. The monsters of education technology are a Trojan Horse poised to dismantle public education, to outsource and unbundle and disrupt and destroy. Those who tell you that education technology promises personalization don’t actually care about student autonomy or agency. They want surveillance and standardization and control. You have been warned.”

2016 10 28

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Don Gorges commented on this

__In This Case, Publishers Should Root for the OER Guys _ When an organization that has created open educational resources (OER), informally known as “free stuff,” and sues FedEx, how much should publishers care about the outcome? – Oct 11 2016

Neal Goff says publishers should be hoping that Great Minds prevails in court

__ Creative Commons CEO Ryan Merkley explains his opposite view and reasons for funding legal support for the defendant, FedEx _ September 9, 2016

Why we’re fighting to protect noncommercial uses

Research: Great Minds Eureka Math,  Great Minds v Fedex Office and Print Services Case 2:16-cv-01462-DRH-ARL

__CC Letter to Judge: “We represent Creative Commons Corporation in connection with the above-referenced matter, and seek the Court’s permission to file an amicus brief supporting the defendant’s motion to dismiss.” _ http://textlab.io/doc/18833946/cc-edny-letter—creative-commons

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Ideally, all syllabi are created to be helpful to students seeking savings by offering them options to the Faculty-recommended reading materials via a comprehensive list of reviewed and rated OER and alternative editions of commercial textbooks. Students and TA’s can [pay-it-forward] help their Faculty by doing the time consuming research throughout the semester to discover these alternative resources to be Faculty-vetted and listed within their Syllabus __

Open educational resources may help students with textbook costs

Open educational resources may help students with textbook costs

ubyssey.ca [Weekly student newspaper of the University of British Columbia]

Some faculty at UBC have been trying to alleviate financial pressures on students by leveraging technologies to help make learning more flexible. According to Loch Brown, a geography professor, open educational resources and open textbooks are a very easy way to do this.

For Brown, utilizing open educational resources was a no-brainer when it came time to update some of the courses in the geography department.

“We were building a lot of interesting course materials and educational resources, and we decided quite early on that we would just share these with everybody,” said Brown.

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

Academics’ ultimate concerns explain motivation for sharing OER

Academics’ ultimate concerns explain motivation for sharing OER

go-gn.net
Dr Glenda Cox (right) with her supervisor, A/Prof Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams
Sukaina Walji, ROER4D Communications Advisor spoke to Dr Glenda Cox, Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Innovation in Teaching and Learning, at the University of Cape Town (UCT) about her recently submitted PhD thesis ‘Explaining the relations between culture, structure and agency in lecturers’ contribution and non-contribution to Open Educational Resources in a Higher Education Institution’.
This blog post considers how this research sheds light on why academics choose or choose not  to share open educational resources, which has important implications for the future sustainability of the OER movement.

 

__”Other pertinent issues around contribution included concerns around beliefs of OER quality and their willingness or not to contribute OER. For some lecturers, quality is related to pedagogical value: will the pedagogy of the resource be improved through sharing? Others were concerned about technical issues and formats of the OER (such as writing styles and file formats). The contributors in this study were less worried about quality than the non-contributors; while the contributors were sometimes concerned about their reputation. they still felt it was the right thing to do as sharing OER met their ultimate concern.”

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Online or classroom learning: What’s better for students? eCampus’ David Porter, University of Toronto’s Earl Woodruff and Georgia Tech’s Charles Isbell weigh in on pros and cons of online learning. __CTVNews video__ http://www.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=980283&playlistId=1.3132053&binId=1.810401&playlistPageNum=1&binPageNum=1

__Recommend [my Alma mater]: Ryerson University’s G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education is Canada’s leading provider of university-based adult learning. _ http://ce-online.ryerson.ca/ce/default.aspx _

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

__St. Joseph Communications: We’re proud to announce the release of our “2017 Print in a Digital World” trend report. _ The third installment of this successful series identifies major trends transforming our omnichannel multiverse and how Marketers can leverage the identified examples to mix, match and marry the exciting world of print and digital. _

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Microsoft Surface Studio is a new category of device, designed to put you at the center of the creative process. Video _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzMLA8YIgG0 _ Turn your desk into a Studio. Learn more: http://surfac.ms/1026YSO

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

__The original set of 176 emoji have been acquired by the Museum of Modern Art. The original emoji, designed by Shigetaka Kurita, are each made within a grid that is just 12 pixels wide and 12 pixels long. First rendered in black and white, within a few years each emoji was painted one of six colors — black, red, orange, lilac, grass green and royal blue.

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

__According to the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, “Where a course relies on assessments that are included with a learning resource, such as an online textbook, the ministry expects colleges to have a policy with respect to their students’ interests.” i.e. must provide students with a free alternative __

Digital textbooks are killing the used textbook market

Digital textbooks are killing the used textbook market

theeyeopener.com

By Laura Woodward

If you’re a student who buys your textbooks used, soon you won’t have that choice.

As textbook publishers shift their products from print to digital the resale market is slowly dying, as students can only buy digital products new.

Digital products are sold via access codes, a set of digits used to unlock an electronic textbook. But those access codes can only be used once, as they expire at the end of the course.

[-]Essentially, students are paying tuition, as well as extra fees to take quizzes.

Since it’s the university’s job, not a textbook publisher’s, to assess and grade students, the Ontario government has restricted how much third-parties can interfere.

According to the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, “Where a course relies on assessments that are included with a learning resource, such as an online textbook, the ministry expects colleges to have a policy with respect to their students’ interests.”

At the University of Waterloo, instructors are encouraged to only use access codes if the cost of resource is no more than $50 and the assessment counts as 20 per cent or less. If either cost and grade value are not met, the instructor must provide students with a free alternative, like writing the online quiz on paper.

At Ryerson, assessments through third- party vendors must not account for more than 25 per cent. But there is no cost restriction, or free alternative that must be provided. Professors can charge students any amount for an online resource that can impact their grade, as long as it does not exceed that 25 per cent.

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges likes this

Open Educational Resources: Is the federal government overstepping its role?

Open Educational Resources: Is the federal government overstepping its role?

educationnext.org
Is the federal government overstepping its role?

__A critical thinker’s perspective in this article on OER by Michael Q. McShane, director of education policy at the Show-Me Institute in Kansas City, Missouri – published in Education Next WINTER 2017 Publisher: Hoover Institution, Leland Stanford Junior University [Stanford University]

=======================

Where Do We Go from Here?

“Educational resources have a long history, from Aelius Donatus’s fourth-century Ars grammatica to the McGuffey’s Readers to the Khan Academy. If we think about open educational resources as part of that timeline, they are the thinnest sliver at the very end. In the future, the movement will have to wrestle with several issues.

First, how can OER advocates maintain a steady stream of high-quality and relevant content? If they cannot keep pace with technology or pedagogical practice, they are going to be left behind.

Second, how do we avoid maxing out teachers? Yes, teachers want better content. They would also like to hold on to their nights and weekends. If open educational resources rely on teachers to spend lots of time sifting through materials or creating it themselves, that could send teachers back to textbooks posthaste.

Finally, is there a productive and appropriate role that the federal government can play? The federal government has extraordinary convening power and the infrastructure to collect and disseminate information about how schools and districts are solving problems. It also makes many large grants to education researchers, and requiring all of the products of their works to be openly licensed could spread what they have learned faster and more cheaply.

On the other hand, the federal government is putting its thumb on the scale for one particular type of content-creation mechanism, and that could disrupt the marketplace. If textbook companies do go out of business, what will happen 5 or 10 years hence? If open-content producers can’t keep up with the coding acumen necessary to make the adaptive technology that the federally funded research prescribes, schools will be in a serious bind. The very organizations that could fill that gap—the textbook companies—will be gone. And this scenario even assumes that the next administration or the next after that will still care about “going open.” It’s quite possible that they won’t. Will the private and nonprofit support be there to keep the movement going? Again, the answers are not clear.”

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

__The College Board’s annual report released Wednesday _ https://trends.collegeboard.org/college-pricing _ College tuition keeps going up, rising faster than inflation and family income. The average total cost of tuition, fees, and room and board rose 10% over the past five years at public colleges and by 12% at private institutions, adjusted for inflation. Median family income rose just 7% over the same time period. _ Article: _ http://money.cnn.com/2016/10/26/pf/college/college-tuition-2016-2017/index.html

__Higher Education Retail Market Facts & Figures via NACS National Association of College Stores _ The latest available data on student spending is from Student Watch: Attitudes & Behaviors toward Course Materials, Fall 2015. Based on survey data, students spent an average of $323 on course materials, or $77 per course. Students spent an average of $672 on a combination of technology, supplies, and required course materials for their classes for fall 2015. _ http://www.nacs.org/research/industrystatistics/higheredfactsfigures.aspx

More Research on Textbook costs and spending:

Fact Checking How Much Do College Students Actually Pay For Textbooks? 2015 > 2016 Phil Hill

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

About The New Florida Virtual Campus Survey On Textbooks

About The New Florida Virtual Campus Survey On Textbooks

mfeldstein.com
Phil Hill – As long-time readers know, I strongly believe that the national discussion about the costs of textbooks and course materials is more productive when we focus on actual student behaviors and impacts, rather than artificial numbers used by many organizations.
The whole report is worth reading, but I’d like to highlight two key points. . .
======================

__The Survey was conducted to help education leaders and policy makers better understand how textbook and course material costs are impacting student perceptions, academic decisions, progress, and perceived value of educational resources. To be able to achieve these objectives the survey should seek useful data on the respondents’ financial circumstances and priorities impacting their purchasing decisions. Ones’ financial resources, education costs impacts access, success, and completion and Free textbooks is likely not the one and only solution.

__I’ve added this article to the collection in my post ‘Fact Checking How Much Do College Students Actually Pay For Textbooks? 2015 > 2016 Phil Hill’ _ https://dongorges.wordpress.com/2016/10/10/fact-checking-how-much-do-college-students-actually-pay-for-textbooks-2015-2016-phil-hill/

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__Oct 21 TJ Bliss tweeted this survey’s Key Finding 1:
“The high cost of textbooks is negatively impacting student access, success, and completion.”

In response, I tweeted a suggestion:
“Survey data should include student’s budget and itemized fixed and discretionary expenditures for an analysis of textbooks’ impact”
My tweet-sized suggestion was too brief I suppose, but there was swift reaction . . . “You are blocked from following @tjbliss and viewing @tjbliss’s Tweets.”

This Survey is an opportunity to gain specific data that would be useful and actionable – “The high cost of textbooks [specific data] is negatively impacting student [specific data] access, success, and completion.”

“In your academic career, has the cost of required textbooks caused you to. . ” may be a leading question when the textbook price is unknown [$50-$100-$300?] or in assuming the cost is “too much” “can’t afford” – for some Students the response likely is “I had money but didn’t see the value in making the purchase”

“The 2016 Student Textbook and Course Materials Survey was conducted to help education leaders and policy makers better understand how textbook and course material costs are impacting student perceptions, academic decisions, progress, and perceived value of educational resources.”

To be able to achieve these objectives the survey should seek useful data on the respondents’ financial circumstances, priorities and perceptions impacting their purchasing decisions, given that there are multiple demographic profiles to define within this group of 22,000 Students.

Free textbooks is not the one and only solution.

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

__”Pearson and IBM are innovating with Watson APIs, education-specific diagnostics and remediation capabilities. Students will be able to dialogue with Watson in real time by asking questions on a particular topic. – Watson will be able to search through an expanded set of education resources to retrieve relevant information to answer the student’s question. – Watson will constantly assess the student’s responses and guide them with hints, feedback, explanations and identify common misconceptions.” _

IBM Watson Education and Pearson to Drive Cognitive Learning Experiences for College Students

IBM Watson Education and Pearson to Drive Cognitive Learning Experiences for College Students

prnewswire.com

LAS VEGAS, Oct. 25, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — IBM (NYSE: IBM) and Pearson (FTSE: PSON) the world’s learning company, today announced a new global education alliance intended to make Watson‘s cognitive capabilities available to millions of college students and professors.

Combining IBM’s cognitive capabilities with Pearson’s digital learning products will give students a more immersive learning experience with their college courses, an easy way to get help and insights when they need it, all through asking questions in natural language just like they would with another student or professor. Importantly, it provides instructors with insights about how well students are learning, allowing them to better manage the entire course and flag students who need additional help.

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges commented on this

__The 55-inch 4K touchscreen is the first hardware product in Google’s rebranded G Suite of cloud-based tools – Launch a Jamboard session and people can join in from anywhere using the Jamboard app on an Android or iOS device. They see a real-time feed from the board and can add text, photos, and drawings to the mix. The leader of the session can share it all with Google Hangout participants. _

Google Jamboard Is a Huge 4K Screen You Can Scribble On

Google Jamboard Is a Huge 4K Screen You Can Scribble On

wired.com
Google reimagines the whiteboard.

The big-screen Jamboard session is essentially replicated on the tablet: You can add things, rearrange them, and pull in images or maps from a side menu. The interactions are limited on a phone, but you see everything on the board in real time, and you can add text or create digital sticky notes. One major limitation is that you can’t really chip in on a laptop or desktop: You can watch a Jam session unfold in a browser, but you can only contribute via the mobile apps.

You can drive a meeting from a tablet, but the massive Jamboard is the ultimate mission control. It includes two chunky passive stylii that feel like sidewalk chalk in your hand, and the screen is pressure-sensitive when you’re writing on it. Magnets keep the stylii and microfiber eraser nestled on Jamboard’s metal base, but don’t worry if Steve from accounting swipes them. Any rubber-tipped stylus works, and you can use your hand to erase things.

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges

Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts & Links October 15 to October 24

dongorges.wordpress.com

Topics-Perspectives-Sectors:

Open Design Visual Communications Creative Marketing Education

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Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts & Links October 15 to October 24

 

Topics – Perspectives – Sectors :

Open  Design  Visual  Communications  Creative  Marketing  Education

Don Gorges

Don Gorges commented on this

__Brand New: New Logo and Identity for Kodak by Work-Order _ It capitalizes on the current acceptance of nostalgia by bringing back a classic icon and it builds on it with a simple, confident aesthetic.

__2 years ago. . .How One Man Hopes to Restore the Legacy of Kodak _ Adweek Interview with Steven Overman on his 7th day as the new CMO _ http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/how-one-man-going-restore-legacy-kodak-160863

Kodak Brand
Kodak — Work-Order
Brand New: New Logo and Identity for Kodak by Work-Order
How One Man Hopes to Restore the Legacy of Kodak | Adweek

2016 10 24

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Don Gorges likes this

BCcampus

In the spirit of openness, we bring you the BCcampus 2015/16 Annual Review

The BCcampus 2015/16 Annual Review

The BCcampus 2015/16 Annual Review

bccampus.ca
A huge aspect of learning is taking the time to reflect on the hard work, accomplishments, and even the failures along the way. These moments help u…

2016 10 24

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__Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts & Links October 15 to October 24 Topics – Perspectives – Sectors : Open Design Visual Communications Creative Marketing Education __ https://lnkd.in/e7imspr _

__I don’t agree with this statement or strategy and didn’t get an answer when I asked who actually said what TJ Bliss is quoting in his tweet, but certainly “we” is the OER community and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation where he is a Program Officer in Education, overseeing grantmaking to expand the reach and efficacy of Open Educational Resources.

2016 10 25

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Don Gorges likes this

__The Education Quality and Accountability Office says the network hosting the “voluntary” online test was targeted by an “extremely large volume of traffic from a vast set of IP addresses around the globe.” It says the impact of the distributed denial of service attack carried out by “an unknown entity or entities” was to block legitimate users such as school boards and students from accessing the test. _

'Intentional, malicious' cyberattack led to Ontario literacy test system crash

‘Intentional, malicious’ cyberattack led to Ontario literacy test system crash

cbc.ca
Ontario’s brand-new online system for standardized tests crashed last week, cancelling the O…

2016 10 24

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Don Gorges likes this

__Research BCcampus Staff _ https://lnkd.in/enyAaAv _ via Public Sector Salaries database _ https://lnkd.in/eZwEztE _ https://lnkd.in/euBsSJK

UBC dominates list of highest-earning university, college employees

UBC dominates list of highest-earning university, college employees

vancouversun.com
The University of B.C. again dominates the list of highest-paid post-secondary scho…
BCcampus, BC Public Sector Salaries, – Vancouver Sun
Public Sector Salaries – Vancouver Sun
Brad Payne Salary
Public Sector Salaries – Vancouver Sun
Barb Murphy Salary
Public Sector Salaries – Vancouver Sun
Lauri Aesoph Salary
Public Sector Salaries – Vancouver Sun
David Porter Salary
Public Sector Salaries – Vancouver Sun
Amanda Coolidge Salary
Public Sector Salaries – Vancouver Sun
Mary Burgess Salary
Public Sector Salaries – Vancouver Sun
Clint Lalonde Salary
Public Sector Salaries – Vancouver Sun
Rajiv Jhangiani Salary
Public Sector Salaries – Vancouver Sun

2016 10 24

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Don Gorges commented on this

Ken Mazurek

NEW LISTING!!! 35 HAVELOCK STREET OPEN HOUSE: OCT 22 & 23, 2pm-4pm Detached, 3-storey, brick home near Dufferin Grove Park 4 bed, 3 bath, 1 car front pad parking Offered at $1,499,000 MLS #C3633747 This large home offers tons of space thr

__With respect, I’d suggest aiming for a slightly-less wide-angle perspective in the photographs for results with less obvious distortion of room dimensions, angles and proportions.

2016 10 24

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Don Gorges commented on this

McGraw-Hill Education

Today’s college students are finding that technologies such as ebooks, adaptive learning tools, and online quizzes are greatly improving their chances for academic success: https://lnkd.in/byfRfHb via Read IT Quik

Digital Technology Key to Improved Student Performance

Digital Technology Key to Improved Student Performance

readitquik.com
More than 50% students find online quizzes and adaptive learning technology have a major i…
McGraw-Hill Education – 2016 Digital Study Trends Survey – Hanover Research
2016-digital-trends-survey-results.pdf
2016 Digital Study Trends
New Survey Data: Four Out of Five College Students Say Digital Learning Technology Helps Improve Their Grades
Digital Technology Key to Improved Student Performance | ReadItQuik

__Key Demographic data: More than three-quarters of students (82%) report receiving straight As or mostly A’s and B’s in 2016. Survey Question: How would you classify your student record? 19% Straight-A student _ 63% Mostly As and Bs _ 16% Mostly Bs and Cs _ 1% Mostly Cs and Ds _ <1% Mostly Ds and Fs This analysis includes data from 2,780 McGraw-Hill Education customers and 531 online panel respondents reached in August of 2016.

2016 10 24

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Inspired by insight patternists and sense-makers, particularly Maria Popova – “Great curation is about pattern-recognition seeing various pieces of culture and spotting similarities across them that paint a cohesive picture of a larger trend.” _ “looking for patterns across different disciplines, different formats, different time periods — I think patterns are fundamental to the human brain and to how we make sense of the world.” _

10 Learnings from 10 Years of Brain Pickings

10 Learnings from 10 Years of Brain Pickings

brainpickings.org
Fluid reflections on keeping a solid center.
Maria Popova 10 Learnings from 10 Years of Brain Pickings – Brain Pickings
10 Learnings from 10 Years of Brain Pickings – Brain Pickings
Flipboard’s Most Favorite of 2010: Interview with Brain Pickings’ Maria Popova
The Art of Curation: An Interview with Maria Popova from BrainPickings | The Nebo Blog: Interactive Marketing, Design & Ramblings
Maria Popova’s Beautiful Mind | Mother Jones
On the Soul-Sustaining Necessity of Resisting Self-Comparison and Fighting Cynicism: A Commencement Address – Brain Pickings

2016 10 23

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Read or don’t, either way, how this ultimately works is anybody’s guess._

The Great Unbundling of Textbook Publishers

The Great Unbundling of Textbook Publishers

mfeldstein.com
When we hear the phrase “unbundling” in education, it usually refers to one of two things. Either it’s about unbundling the university into co…

2016 10 23

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Curriki is now offering a Search API (application program interface) that can be integrated into any organization’s application to search Curriki’s library of K-12 open educational resources (OER). Searches can be conducted by text-based query, type, subject, subject category, grade level, review rating or standard. Learn more about Curriki’s API and New Personalized Services _ http://www.curriki.org/curriki-unveils-new-personalized-services/ _

Curriki Unveils New Personalized Services

Customized Services Put Quality Curriculum at Teachers’ Fingertips

Curriki, the leading K-12 global community for creating and sharing Open Educational Resources (OER), has created a new array of custom services to give educators direct and personalized access to Curriki’s high-quality curriculum resources on their school’s own websites, Curriki CEO Kim Jones announced

2016 10 22

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Don Gorges likes this

Gerard Dolan

How the Web Became Unreadable

How the Web Became Unreadable

backchannel.com
I thought my eyesight was beginning to go. It turns out, I’m suffering from design.

It’s been getting harder for me to read things on my phone and my laptop. I’ve caught myself squinting and holding the screen closer to my face. I’ve worried that my eyesight is starting to go.

These hurdles have made me grumpier over time, but what pushed me over the edge was when Google’s App Engine console — a page that, as a developer, I use daily — changed its text from legible to illegible. Text that was once crisp and dark was suddenly lightened to a pallid gray. Though age has indeed taken its toll on my eyesight, it turns out that I was suffering from a design trend.

There’s a widespread movement in design circles to reduce the contrast between text and background, making type harder to read. Apple is guilty. Google is, too. So is Twitter.

Typography may not seem like a crucial design element, but it is.

2016 10 22

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Don Gorges likes this

__November 7, 2017, will mark the fifth anniversary since the Copyright Modernization Act came into force in Canada. But the act has brought enormous disruption to the book economy, which is based largely on the intangible capital that is copyright. For many Canadian authors, creators, and publishers, this act has been nothing short of a disaster.

Nicole Saint-Jean, President, Association nationale des éditeurs de livres (ANEL)

nicole-saint-jean

Canadian Copyright Modernization Act: Chronicle of a Disaster Foretold – Publishing Perspectives

publishingperspectives.com

However, all is perhaps not lost: Section 92 of the act stipulates that it be reviewed by a committee of the Senate and the House of Commons five years after taking effect. Let’s underscore how important it is for the government of Canada to set up a fact-based review of the repercussions the act has had. This review should be based on facts rather than perceptions or current thinking.

2016 10 22

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Jay Chaney

Yes! Please! I have never understood how people can settle for anything less than exceptional. How do you go to work every day and say “I’m good with mediocre”? Consumers don’t hate advertising. They hate bad advertising; and rightfully so. Yet, so many marketers and advertisers create garbage. Have some pride, take risks, push yourself, push the industry, set new bars, and, assume the best of your audience. Interested to see what Gillette puts out, however. The guy shaving in the mirror shtick is getting a little long in the tooth and was never great advertising to begin with. I will accept this as Gillette challenging itself.

'Don’t ever accept mediocrity': P&G’s Marc Pritchard tells marketers to stop putting out crappy ads

‘Don’t ever accept mediocrity’: P&G’s Marc Pritchard tells marketers to stop putting out crappy ads

thedrum.com

Speaking at the ANA Masters of Marketing conference in Orlando, Procter & Gamble’s chief brand officer Marc Pritchard explained to attendees how many of the company’s brands, including Tide, Always and Pantene, have combated these issues by putting a premium on creativity.

During his talk, Pritchard admitted that many of P&G’s brands have done their fair share of bad advertising. He cited a bizarre Pepto-Bismol video about a boy raised by goats and a strange Pantene post featuring enchiladas as just a few examples of the company’s sub-par advertising, explaining that ads like these are what prompted P&G to rethink its creative approach.

“In our quest to do dynamic, real-time marketing in the digital age, we were producing literally thousands of new ads,” he said. “We eventually concluded that while the world was getting louder, all we were doing was adding to the noise. We decided to step up our game and give consumers the experience they deserve. We’ve made a choice to raise the bar on creativity, because the consumers that we serve deserve our very best, and it is the key to unlocking growth.”

By following three guideposts, which are “express the brand as a masterpiece painted on a creative canvas,” “elevate the craft,” and “embrace creativity as a human endeavor,” Pritchard said that P&G has been able to dig itself out of the “content crap trap” and produce advertising that its brands can be proud of.

2016 10 21

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Pearson

“We want to ensure that all our students have equitable access to required course materials the very first day they walk into the classroom,” says Candice Jackson, the school’s acting vice president for Academic Affairs.

An Online Textbook Scholarship for Every Student at KSU

An Online Textbook Scholarship for Every Student at KSU

pearsonlearningnews.com

Making Essential Course Materials Affordable

As students across the nation returned to campus this fall, college affordability was an increasingly frequent topic of discussion among policymakers and political candidates. As the debate over how to address this important issue continues, one university is taking matters into its own hands.

At Kentucky State University, all students receive a scholarship to cover the full cost of their course materials. This new program, announced in August, delivers these free course materials in a 100% digital format, through Pearson’s Direct Digital Access model.

2016 10 21

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Don Gorges commented on this

__”There’s a perception that ink is one of the most expensive substances in the world,” says Thom Brown, marketing manager at HP. _ HP explains why printer ink is so expensive _ https://lnkd.in/eYA4UHR [graphic via http //https://lnkd.in/ehhi-XE]

What HP Must Do to Make Amends for Its Self-Destructing Printers | Electronic Frontier Foundation
What HP Must Do to Make Amends for Its Self-Destructing Printers | Electronic Frontier Foundation
HP explains why printer ink is so expensive | Computerworld
Pricey Printer Ink Has Consumers Seeing Red – Consumer Reports News
The Cost of Printer Ink – Consumer Reports Magazine
HP apologises for lack of communication over ‘timebomb’ software update | Technology | The Guardian

__HP’s printers and ink cartridge business revenue is completely unrelated, I guess: Hewlett Foundation provides funding to grantees to advocate for OER as a replacement of commercial textbooks based on a claim that textbook costs are a barrier to education

__Cory Doctorow wrote a letter to HP when HP has activated a dormant feature in Officejet Pro printers (and possibly other models), so that the printers now automatically verify whether its ink cartridges are official HP ink and not competitors’ products or even refilled HP cartridges. HP customers should be able to use the ink of their choosing in their printers __

What HP Must Do to Make Amends for Its Self-Destructing Printers

__HP apologises for lack of communication over ‘timebomb’ software update _ Customers will be able to undo the software update that made printers reject third-party ink cartridges _ https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/sep/29/hp-timebomb-software-update _

2016 10 21

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Don Gorges commented on this

__In this e-Literate TV video, Michael Feldstein discusses the benefits of Adaptive Learning for both Students and Teachers with McGraw Hill’s Alfred Essa, Stephen Laster and Matt Haldeman _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0ww_Yp30PM _ with transcript

2016 10 20

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Jeff Downing

Pearson, Unizin Consortium Partner to Provide Affordable Digital Courseware, Wiley’s CEO addresses the Frankfurt Book Fair, Stanford’s new VR program about ocean acidification, and rights hacks for publishers.

"Pearson, Unizin Consortium Partner to Provide Affordable Digital Courseware"

Pearson and Unizin, Ltd. announced a partnership to increase access to affordable digital course materials to college students on the first day of class. Utilizing Unizin’s All Students Acquire model and leveraging Pearson’s Digital Direct Access (DDA) model, Unizin can provide its member institutions with Pearson’s high-quality eTextbook catalog and proven adaptive learning products, such as MyLab™ and Mastering™, at significant cost savings. The partnership will also provide educators with valuable insights into students’ learning activity through data access, enabling instructors to monitor learners’ progress and intervene when needed to ensure they are on the path to success.

2016 10 20

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Akademos, Inc.

New curriculum service provides college faculty with consultations on low-cost learning materials. http://hubs.ly/H04Q2Z30

Akademos Launches New Curriculum Development Service for College Faculty

Akademos Launches New Curriculum Development Service for College Faculty

blog.akademos.com

Partnership with NobleStream provides faculty with individual consultations for the selection of innovative, low-cost learning materials

Akademos has launched a custom curriculum development service for college faculty that helps institutions improve textbook affordability and educational outcomes.

Akademos Curriculum Services™ provides faculty with personal consultations on new learning models and course material choices that support faculty and student success by improving access to alternative, low-cost options. Through a strategic partnership with education consulting firm NobleStream, faculty at Akademos’ 120+ partner institutions can engage with NobleStream course advisors and explore opportunities to use unique courseware from best-in-class educational providers. Key features include:

  • Discovery of solution providers in the Akademos Adoption & Analytics Portal with easy “one-click” faculty scheduling for consultations
  • Custom course pricing options that dramatically reduce costs while providing high-quality digital course materials and relevant, advanced instructional products
  • One-stop access to a suite of innovative educational solution providers including Fulcrum Labs, Lrnr, MindEdge, panOpen, uCertify and many more to help faculty evaluate and select the most appropriate resources for meeting their learning objectives

2016 10 20

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Don Gorges likes this

BCcampus

Do you love writing? Are you looking for a little extra work freelance writing for an incredible company? Check out this cool opportunity to work with us!

RFP for freelance writing

RFP for freelance writing

bccampus.ca
The BCcampus Communications and Marketing team is looking for one or more freelance writers. This role would best suit someone who is passionate and proficient at researching, interviewing and writing articles for our news blog. We are looking for wordsmiths who excel at creating content that articulates and builds the BCcampus story through the eyes of its stakeholders, staff members, and community.

2016 10 20

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Don Gorges commented on a group discussion

Higher Education Management

Open Educational Resources

A new survey of higher-ed faculty indicates OER use is on the brink of a sizable expansion.

Faculty: OER use could triple in the next 5 years

By Laura Devaney

The survey, Open Educational Resources (OER) and the Evolving Higher Education Landscape, also found that OER use for supplemental learning materials may nearly quadruple in size, from 5 percent to 19 percent.

“Being able to afford a higher education—from tuition to living expenses and course materials—continues to be a challenge for many students. At Cengage, we are constantly working with faculty to create new, affordable learning options that are high quality and engaging. This includes integrating OER use into a growing number of digital learning solutions, including our MindTap and Learning Objects platforms,” said Cheryl Costantini, VP of Content Strategy, Cengage Learning.

Don Gorges

__The Cengage Survey Report and Babson Survey Report both use the Hewlett definition of OER: _http://www.hewlett.org/programs/education-program/open-educational-resources _ “Open educational resources include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, tests, software, and any other tools, materials, or techniques used to support access to knowledge.” When 77% of Faculty indicated an interest in future use of OER, the specifics were left unasked – they might be thinking of using a YouTube video or they might be considering creating a OER Z-Degree Program.

Brian Jacobs

Thanks, Don Gorges , it’s certainly important to probe the assumptions of such forecasts. When OpenStax can now boast of >800,000 students using their books in just a short time since their release (these are probably among the fastest market adoptions ever), and with many higher ed institutions in the US either already working with core OER (as textbook replacements) or planning to, it would be fair to assume that the expansion is indeed quite sizable. Not YouTube videos and not limited to Z Degree programs. I can directly corroborate this, based on the enormous interest in open content we see from faculty and administrators. Cheers, Brian

2016 10 20

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Student Leadership priorities of the 5 governing Student organizations RÉFO CFS OUSA OGSA CSA were discussed at the Student Leadership seminar Oct 18 _ this graphic by Giulia Forsythe illustrates the key priorities of Ontario Students [OUSA mentions ‘OER’]  [graphics by Giulia Forsythe]

__Advancing OER in Ontario – Presentation by Brady Yano of SPARC and David Porter of eCampusOntario to the 5 governing Student organizations RÉFO CFS OUSA OGSA CSA at the Student Leadership seminar Oct 18 in Toronto [graphics by Giulia Forsythe]

 

2016 10 20

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Register for a LunchnLearn introduction to the new Ryerson Pressbooks platform and Guide to Open Textbooks, an instructional guide for faculty produced by the LTO and Ryerson Library – Facilitators: Michelle Schwartz – Instructional Design & Research Strategist and Ann Ludbrook – Copyright Librarian __

Open Your Textbook: Adopting, Adapting or Creating Your Own Open Textbook

library.ryerson.ca
Ryerson University

Join Michelle Schwartz, Instructional Design & Research Strategist, and Ann Ludbrook, Copyright Librarian, for an introduction to the new Ryerson Guide to Open Textbooks, an instructional guide for faculty produced by the LTO and Ryerson Library. Learn how to adopt, adapt, and create your own open textbook using Ryerson’s new Pressbooks platform. Open textbooks provide instructors with the opportunity to create texts uniquely tailored to their own courses. They also save students money. By the end of this workshop you will have all the tools needed to get started building your own open textbook.

2016 10 19

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Don Gorges commented on this

__My Journal of BCcampus Open Textbook Project 2012 – 2016 _ BC Families First Agenda _https://dongorges.wordpress.com/2016/10/11/bccampus-open-textbook-project-history-2012-2016-_-bc-families-first-agenda/__

The BC Open Textbook Project celebrates four years of success

The BC Open Textbook Project celebrates four years of success

bccampus.ca
Students in B.C. are celebrating four years of free open textbooks and up to $2.3 million in savings through the BC Open Textbook Project.

In addition to open textbooks, the Open Textbook Project offers free open education resources including resources to make open textbooks more accessible to people with disabilities, an authoring guide to assist with creating or adapting open textbooks, and an open education resource toolkit. The toolkit provides information on how interested student societies can advocate for greater open textbook adoption on campus.

Projects in development through the Open Textbook Project include a new open textbook on Aboriginal knowledge and science education research, supplementary teaching resources and adoption packages for common core trades open textbooks.

2016 10 19

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Don Gorges likes this

Doug Bannister

Q&A: As a business owner and communications industry veteran, Jean-Pierre Lacroix, R.G.D., President of Shikatani Lacroix, has seen a massive evolution in technology and customer/employee expectations over the last two decades. Here’s what he had to share on digital transformation growth and ROI during a recent 1:1 in part 2 of this executive series http://buff.ly/2ef3LiU via The Huffington Post.

Digital Transformation Of Business And Communications - Part 2

Digital Transformation Of Business And Communications – Part 2

huffingtonpost.ca

As a business owner and communications industry veteran, Jean-Pierre Lacroix, President of Shikatani Lacroix, a Toronto-based branding and design agency, has seen a massive evolution in technology and customer/employee expectations over the last two decades. In part 2 of this multi-part executive Q&A series I will chat with Jean-Pierre about what is driving digital transformation in businesses and the potential ROI from it.

2016 10 17

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Visual history of the Drafts of the “Foundations for OER Strategy Development” document _ This searchable background Research highlights all of the issues raised and visually tracks the comments, discussions and changes made in each of the Drafts through to the final Version _ https://dongorges.wordpress.com/2016/10/14/visual-history-of-the-drafts-of-the-foundations-for-oer-strategy-development-document/

2016 10 17

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Nicole Allen was likely the orig. author of the “Students spend $XXXX on textbooks” myth/meme. The Student PIRGs 2013 Make Textbooks Affordable Campaign documenthttp://calpirgstudents.org/sites/student/files/resources/S13%20Textbooks%20Project%20Packet_0.pdf _ underscores decisions to create a ‘textbook cost crisis’ advocacy strategy _ https://lnkd.in/ewd8q3s

Fact Checking How Much Do College Students Actually Pay For Textbooks? 2015 > 2016 Phil Hill

2016 10 17

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Tony Bates 2014 series on Writing an open textbook: tracking an author’s perspective “In the spirit of open-ness, I plan to share this journey through a series of blog posts that tracks my progress, my questions, the answers I find, and I also hope to encourage others to help me as I do this.” __

Dr. Tony Bates shares insights on writing an Open Textbook in 2014 – Teaching in a Digital Age

2016 10 17

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Don Gorges commented on this

__BC News Release 4 years ago, October 16, 2012: Under B.C.’s Families First Agenda, British Columbia is set to become the first province in Canada to offer students free online, open textbooks for the 40 most popular post-secondary courses. __

BCcampus Open Textbook Project History 2012 – 2016 _ BC Families First Agenda

BCcampus Open Textbook Project History 2012 – 2016 _ BC Families First Agenda

dongorges.wordpress.com
===============================================
Tuesday, October 16, 2012 9:15 AM

VANCOUVER – British Columbia is set to become the first province in Canada to offer students free online, open textbooks for the 40 most popular post-secondary courses.

Up to 200,000 B.C. students each year could benefit from this move under B.C.’s Families First Agenda, saving each student hundreds of dollars a year or more on textbooks – money that can go toward other learning supplies or living expenses.

2016 10 17

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Practically speaking, the Delhi High Court judgment, [-] has weakened the publishers in any future bargain._one of the unintended consequences of Delhi High Court judgment viz., stifling creativity and scholarship at grass root levels and disincentivising medium and small scale publishers. An absolute exception vitiates the mischief rule of interpretation i.e the very mischief the Copyright Act intends to address and purposive rule of interpretation i.e giving effect to the twin purposes of promotion and protection of creativity and is therefore, legally untenable

 

__A Critique of DU Photocopy Judgment – I _ http://spicyip.com/2016/10/a-critique-of-du-photocopy-judgment-i.html __ A Critique of DU Photocopy Judgment – II _ http://spicyip.com/2016/10/a-critique-of-du-photocopy-judgment-ii.html

2016 10 17

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Color In Sight, a documentary created by TEALEAVES, brings together 11 experts of industry, gathered around one powerful, little detail: color. The documentary explores how top brands – ranging from Nike and Pantone to OPI and Herman Miller – think about and use color in the most effective and compelling way. By hearing their own experiences, the goal is to bring about an appreciation for the detail of color selection and how it can have a large impact on the perception of products and services enjoyed by many. Read more: https //https://lnkd.in/ejFXtAs

2016 10 16

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Don Gorges commented on this

Maryellen Valaitis

Well thought out letter to editor of FT on educational material. Learning and outcomes are what really counts.

Cost of digital learning tools should not count

ft.com
From Robert S Feldman. Sir, Anne-Marie Slaughter, in ‘A closed-off corner of learning set free by technology’, offers an insightful look into the rapidly changing higher education landscape

__Robert S Feldman: snip “The prospect of free textbooks is obviously appealing, both to students and to educators interested in reducing the overall cost of higher education. But cost alone can hardly be our primary concern when weighing a tool that can impact on whether or not a student passes a course, graduates from university, or is prepared for future employment. _ Indeed, the suggestion that open educational resources can or should displace paid materials completely is highly misleading. Having been involved in the creation of educational material for college students throughout my career, I know there are no open resources that are as flexible, as reliable, or as impactful as the newest generation of paid education resources.”

2016 10 15

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Don Gorges

Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts & Links October 3 to October 15

dongorges.wordpress.com

Topics-Perspectives-Sectors:

Open Design Visual Communications Creative Marketing Education

2016 10 16

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Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts & Links October 3 to October 15

Topics-Perspectives-Sectors:

Open Design Visual Communications Creative Marketing Education

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__The Alchemy of Color and Chemical Change in Medieval Manuscripts. Some of the most vivid pigments in medieval manuscripts were manufactured through alchemy, an experimental practice that predates modern chemistry. Today, chemistry deepens our knowledge about paint colors, their identification, and potential continued transformations.

The Alchemy of Color - Getty Museum video

The Alchemy of Color – Getty Museum video

blogs.getty.edu
Color explored in medieval manuscripts.

2016 10 14

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Joel commented on the increased feasibility of very short-run Textbook orders via ink jet presses _additional thoughts about mainstreaming ink jet printed books; 1. Print and binding quality have to be offset substitutable. 2. Job costing has to be computer driven to eliminate people based costing __

Quad/Graphics CEO Joel Quadracci on the Company's Digital Printing Strategy on WhatTheyThink

Quad/Graphics CEO Joel Quadracci on the Company’s Digital Printing Strategy on WhatTheyThink

whattheythink.com
Quad/Graphics CEO Joel Quadracci speaks with Senior Editor Cary Sherburne about the company’s book printing strategy. He reports that digital printing is important for book printing, as well as other parts of the business and shares his thoughts about how it and other technologies help the company bring innovative solutions to its customers across multiple industries.

2016 10 14

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Don Gorges commented on this

__”Most people in the survey (74 percent) are using a mix of digital and paper-based textbooks for their courses. And a similar number are using open educational resources (OER), taking advantage of the numerous free and low-cost digital materials available for college study.” The full results of the Campus Technology Teaching with Technology Survey appear in the August/September digital issue of Campus Technology: See Pages 19-33 _ Survey: Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology Teaching with Technology Survey

Article: Dian Schaffhauser – Laptops, Desktops Most Common Form of Instructional Tech in the Classroom — Campus Technology

2016 10 14

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Don Gorges commented on this

__TCC agreed to pilot Lumen Learning’s Waymaker courseware, which acts as an OER delivery system but is augmented by personalized learning features that help faculty members connect with students and guides student learning – The pilot, which launched in fall 2015, ended at the conclusion of the summer 2016 term – Pilot results TBD __

TCC Takes Z Degrees to the Next Level With Adaptive Learning (EdSurge News)

TCC Takes Z Degrees to the Next Level With Adaptive Learning (EdSurge News)

edsurge.com
When students at Virginia’s Tidewater Community College (TCC) earn their Associate of Scien…

2016 10 14

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Don Gorges likes this

Rich Bassett

To our many friends and colleagues please see our exciting announcement!

St. Joseph Communications Acquires Personalized Direct Marketing Firm Bassett Direct

bassettdirect.ca   October 11, 2016 (Toronto, Ontario)

St. Joseph Communications is pleased to announce today it has finalized an agreement to acquire Bassett Direct, one of Canada’s most experienced providers of direct marketing services and variable printing programs.

“We are thrilled to welcome Bassett Direct’s strong industry reputation, talent, knowledge and 22 years of experience to the St. Joseph organization,” says John Gagliano, President of St. Joseph’s Print Group.

“We are extremely excited about joining the St. Joseph Communications family,” said Rich Bassett, President of Bassett Direct. “There is a strong fit between the two organizations and I am confident that our customers and employees will benefit greatly from an innovative printer that is also part of an integrated communications company.”

2016 10 11

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Don Gorges commented on this

BCcampus

A great event recap from the Open Education Strategy Forum for B.C. post-secondary institutions held in Vancouver last week.

BCcampus hosts its first Open Education Strategy Forum

BCcampus hosts its first Open Education Strategy Forum

open.bccampus.ca
On October 6, 2016, BCcampus hosted the first provincial Open Education Strategy Forum in Vancouver, B.C. The event sought to engage representatives from provincial post-secondary education (PSE) institutions in meaningful and relevant conversations about how open educational policy can pave the way for the sustainable and innovative practice of open pedagogy.
Guest speaker Daniel DeMarte, Vice President for Academic Affairs & Chief Academic Officer at Tidewater Community College, who worked with our own Amanda Coolidge to develop the OER Policy Development Tool, closed the day with a great reminder that there’s no advantage to re-inventing the wheel when it comes to policy development. Daniel shared policy examples from Tidewater Community College and encourage everyone to use the OER Policy Development Tool to generate their own institutional policies with just a few mouse clicks.

Participants worked in small groups organized by institution to explore two topics:

  • How can open educational practices align with the institutional strategic direction
  • The barriers that exist at each institution when it comes to creating Open Education policy

__Lumen Learning is a one-and-only, a monopoly for-profit company within the education sector. The strategy of the fascinating business model rolls-out with this Faculty Forum and Lumen Learning’s OER Policy Development Tool, and it will eventually blip on the radar of business case writers and marketing sector journalists.

Lumen Learning Open Business Model Canvas _ https://docs.google.com/drawings/d/1l-kSBcCCupbBGOvxZkRy3hQkcnqZuLTmeFuMmlC3zwo/edit

2016 10 12

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Don Gorges

__Learning in the Digital Age, The Conference Board of Canada free report _ Executive Summary snips – There are about 1.3 million enrollments in fully online university and college courses in Canada. E-learning accounts for between 10 and 15 per cent of PSE learning. Greater adoption of e-learning will happen if institutional focus on traditional classroom delivery can be reduced; faculty are adequately supported when they teach online; and e-learning design, development, and delivery practices improve.

Learning in the Digital AgeMichael Grant | October 2016 – ARTICLE

Learning in the Digital Age – REPORT – The Conference Board of Canada, October 12, 2016 Website by Michael Grant

2016 10 13

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Don Gorges

OpenStax, OER Commons partner on community hubs

OpenStax, OER Commons partner on community hubs

news.rice.edu
Rice University-based publisher OpenStax is partnering with OER Commons to provide online community hubs where instructors can freely share and modify syllabuses, homework, study guides and other open-copyright course materials that are made specifically for each of the free textbooks in OpenStax’s growing catalog.

2016 10 13

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Don Gorges likes this

Clint Lalonde

Open puts the public in public education

Open puts the public in public education

clintlalonde.net
Robin DeRosa’s great Ignite Talk DML2016 on open education.
In 5 short minutes she connects the various strands of open education (open access, open educational resources, and open pedagogy) to the broader societal mandate of our public institutions, which is to serve the public good. And while Robin is based in the US, the main thesis of her talk is applicable to anyone working in public education anywhere.

2016 10 12

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Don Gorges commented on this

Cut Student Costs and Improve Learning

Michael Hale – VP Sales at VitalSource Technologies]
What would happen if learning materials were provided to all students on or before the first day of class? If all required learning materials, including textbooks, were provided to all students on or before the first day of class, the average price per student of learning materials would drop and students would be more successful.

__Ideally, all Faculty syllabi help students seeking savings by offering them options to the recommended reading materials via a comprehensive list of reviewed and rated alternative commercial textbook editions and/or free OER. Consider the ways that Students and TA’s can help their Faculty by doing the time consuming research throughout the course of the semester to discover these alternative commercial and free educational resources to be Faculty-vetted and listed as options within their Syllabus.

2016 10 12

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Don Gorges likes this

Adobe Document Cloud

Can you spot the differences? Don’t worry, you don’t have to. “Compare Files” is a powerful new Acrobat DC feature and one of the most popular tools in Acrobat: Compare Documents. The all-new Compare Files tool lets you quickly and accurately see differences between two PDF files like never before. It breaks down all the changes and delivers them in a visually appealing side-by-side view, as well as a summary view.

AcrobatDC_Compare_Files.jpg

2016 10 12

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Don Gorges commented on this

Don Gorges

__“It’s not that we’re trying to destroy publishers. It’s just that we don’t care.” Tweet by TJ Bliss @tjbliss 7:03 PM – 22 Apr 2015 @cgreen #oeglobal __ https://twitter.com/tjbliss/status/591014405850009601

2016 10 12

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Don Gorges

__ Houghton Mifflin Harcourt today announced the release of HMH Science Dimensions™ a brand-new, K–12 science program built specifically to address the Three Dimensions of Science Learning outlined in the Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Performance Expectations of NGSS. Built with a digital-first mentality, this program provides an authentic approach to increasing student achievement in science and preparing teachers for engineering instruction.

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt HMH, HMH Science Dimensions, K-12 science curriculum, Next Generation Science Standards NGSS
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt – Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Launches First K-12 Curricula Built from the Ground Up to Address Next Generation Science Standards
HMH Science Dimensions | NGSS Science Curriculum

2016 10 12

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Don Gorges likes this

Leah Power

Ad industry's new business cycle is now a 'loser's game' warns top consultant - Mumbrella

Ad industry’s new business cycle is now a ‘loser’s game’ warns top consultant – Mumbrella

mumbrella.com.au
One of the most respected agency consultants in the world has said “each new business win is a loss for the industry”, and warned agencies are rapidly putting themselves out of business. Farmer, author of the book ‘Madison Avenue Manslaughter’, said the agency of the future would be one that starts from the mindset of a consultancy rather than just being the creator of campaigns.

2016 10 12

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Don Gorges

__Delivering Design-Led Innovation A practical, well-written report on how to use design to drive innovation. _ via Higher Education Management, Keith Hampson, PhD _https //https://lnkd.in/esJ4_g8 _ REPORT link: _ http://msenterprise.global.ssl.fastly.net/wordpress/2016/09/Delivering-Design-Led-Innovation.pdf

2016 10 12

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Print Marketing v Digital Marketing: “Digital messages require 21 per cent more cognitive effort to process and retain than physical messages. Unaided brand recall for a physical message stood at 75 per cent versus only 44 per cent for digital. The paper message elicited a 20 per cent higher motivation response.” Note: St. Joseph Communications 2017 Print in a Digital World trend report to be released at the end of this month. __

Physical mail marketing still has plenty to offer advertisers

Physical mail marketing still has plenty to offer advertisers

theglobeandmail.com

Physical mail fills a much-needed, and very human, sensory deficit in the virtual world, where we spend most of our time these days. While people love talking to Alexa (Amazon’s latest gadget) to order whatever they are running short on, they notice and retain a lot more of a paper promotional offer than they would from a purely digital message.

The most important renaissance in advertising has gone largely unnoticed. In their race to find the next big breakthrough, marketers didn’t stop to realize that paper catalogues and marketing mail are emerging as an effective tool, even to engage digital natives.

2016 10 06

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Don Gorges

__Excellent Keynote/Must Read:_ Michael Caulfield – New Directions in Open Education [Open Pedagogy] __

New Directions in Open Education

New Directions in Open Education

hapgood.us
Keynote given at Metropolitan State’s TLTS conference in Denver, CO. 
A Sense of Audience –  I’m going to start by telling a story about how I got here. I’ve …

“. . . And so having an audience, a real audience, is a gift. So is having a sense of belonging, and a sense that your uniqueness matters. I happen to think these are gifts that Open Education is in a unique position to  bestow on our students. We just have to hold on to that human core of open, and not get distracted by the shiny things of edtech. We have to latch on to that vision and carry it forward. And that’s what I hope we will do.”

2016 10 10

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Don Gorges commented on this

__The author, Amitabh Pandey, is an alumnus of the Delhi School of Economics with personal experience of the circumstances these Students face with the multiple [10+] reading material selections assigned by their Faculty _ he offers a rare balanced perspective of the issues in this infringement case [https://lnkd.in/ev8MfgD] __ https://lnkd.in/eqzhaFh

Copyright: why selling photocopied books to students isn't exactly a social service

Copyright: why selling photocopied books to students isn’t exactly a social service

catchnews.com
No, getting photocopied textbooks won’t necessarily deprive students of quality education. Here’s why …

2016 10 07

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Suggest paying incentives to Professors who rework their syllabi to help students seeking savings by offering them options via a comprehensive list of vetted alternative textbook editions or OER. Consider the ways that Students and TA’s can help their Faculty by doing the research throughout the course of the semester to discover these commercial and free educational resource alternatives to be Faculty-vetted and added as options within the Syllabus.

Rutgers University Libraries Provide Relief for Soaring Textbook Costs

Rutgers University Libraries Provide Relief for Soaring Textbook Costs

news.rutgers.edu
Rutgers University has become the first of New Jersey’s institutions of higher education to formally take action against the rising cost of textbooks by launching the Open and Affordable Textbook Project (OAT). The initiative includes a grant program administered by Rutgers University Libraries that will give incentives to faculty or department groups that replace a traditional textbook with a free, low-cost or open alternative. This program has the potential to save students across the university as much as $500,000 within its first year.

2016 10 04

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Don Gorges

__Rafter360 relied on a business model that made the college its customer. After contracting with the institution, it would deliver all required books and materials for every course so that students would have them by the first day of classes. The cost was a flat per-student fee — reportedly in the range of $600 to $800 a year — that the college would collect from all students either as part of their tuition or as part of an extra student fee.

Sudden Demise of Start-Up Textbook Supplier Leaves Small Colleges to Scramble

Sudden Demise of Start-Up Textbook Supplier Leaves Small Colleges to Scramble

chronicle.com

Investors in a Silicon Valley company called Rafter pulled the plug on it on Friday

2016 10 07

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Open Design Visual Communications Creative Marketing Education Sector Perspectives __ image: ‘Dream Sequence’ __

Downes and Wiley - A Conversation on Open Educational Resources

Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts & Links September 5 to October 3

dongorges.wordpress.com
Open Design Visual Communications Creative Marketing Education Sector Perspectives

2016 10 03

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Don Gorges likes this

David Travis

Your body text is too small. Make it 20px minimum.

Your Body Text Is Too Small

Your Body Text Is Too Small

medium.com
Why website body text should be bigger, and ways to optimize it.

Body text is the key component in communicating the main bulk of a message or story, and it’s probably the most important element on a website, even if people sometimes read just the headlines.

Why would we limit the effectiveness of body text by minimizing its size to a browser-default that’s now over 20 years old, even on large displays?

2016 10 07

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Publisher appeal against a Delhi High Court judgement, as expected: “The publishers said that the “equitable access to knowledge is important. But such access would not exist without the efforts of content creators, authors, illustrators, designers, publishers and everyone else involved in the creation and dissemination of original content, and their rights must be respected. Access to knowledge will be reduced if this ceases to happen…” __

Rameshwari Photocopy case: Publishers to appeal in Delhi High Court

Rameshwari Photocopy case: Publishers to appeal in Delhi High Court

livemint.com
Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press and Taylor and Francis will file an appeal before Delhi High Court urging the court to restrict Rameshwari Photocopy.

The publishers said that the “equitable access to knowledge is important. But such access would not exist without the efforts of content creators, authors, illustrators, designers, publishers and everyone else involved in the creation and dissemination of original content, and their rights must be respected. Access to knowledge will be reduced if this ceases to happen…”

The move comes nearly three weeks after a single judge bench of the Delhi High Court rejected theinternational publishers case and allowed the photocopy shop to continue its business.

__The Delhi high court on Thursday agreed to hear appeals filed by international publishers _ The publishers challenged a 16 September ruling of the Delhi high court delivered by Justice Rajiv Sahai Endlaw, which dismissed their plea to restrain Rameshwari Photocopy Service, a shop on the Delhi University (DU) campus, from selling photocopies of textbooks and course material. A two-judge bench headed by Justice Pradeep Nandrajog said that the issue needed to be considered – The arguments in the case will be heard on 29 November.

Delhi HC agrees to hear appeal against order favouring Rameshwari Photocopy

A two-judge bench of the Delhi high court said that the issue needed to be considered

2016 10 04

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Don Gorges commented on this

Are online access codes the new textbook monopoly?

By Laura Devaney, Director of News, @eSN_Laura
October 4th, 2016

__I suggest the best Faculty syllabi help students seeking savings by offering them options via a comprehensive list of vetted alternative textbook editions or OER. Consider the ways that Students and TA’s can help their Faculty by doing the research throughout the course of the semester to discover these commercial and free educational resource alternatives to be Faculty-vetted and added as options within the Syllabus.

__Gaining access to ones online purchase of a digital resource via PIN / Code / Proof of Purchase is a conventional ecommerce practice – it’s not an evil plot by vendors of digital products. In the Access Denied report, The Student PIRGs have siezed upon ‘Access Codes’ as proof of evil-doing and I suggest that OER advocates aren’t telling the whole story or the whole truth about the industry’s transition to digital resources. . . however, that’s the OER advocate / lobbyist’s job, and one could see that as evil-doing. PS Laura Devaney – it could be worth your journalistic research efforts to source and publish evidence of Student PIRGs’ claims of Publishers’ ‘high profits’.

2016 10 04

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Don Gorges

__”Design is a differentiator in the market because it adds real value. It’s a lesson that higher ed is just beginning to learn.”

Below: Several links to past presentations offer reasons ‘Why design matters in digital higher education’

Seven (Not-So-Obvious) Trends in Digital Higher Education

Seven (Not-So-Obvious) Trends in Digital Higher Education

slideshare.net
Dr Keith Hampson

2016 10 05

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1 person liked Don Gorges’ comment on this

McGraw-Hill Education

Our vision is to unlock the full potential of each learner. David Levin explains how we’re focused on applying learning science to make that happen: https://lnkd.in/bSGp6dr Video & presentation from the 2016 IMPACT Speaker Series hosted by Georgia Tech.

Reconnecting the Soul of our Business… and Going Digital Too!

Reconnecting the Soul of our Business… and Going Digital Too!

mheducation.com

The IMPACT Speaker Series is hosted by the Institute for Leadership and Entrepreneurship at the Georgia Tech’s Scheller College of Business. The series invites business leaders to share their experiences and wisdom with students and entrepreneurs on topics ranging from corporate finance to social responsibility.

On August 31, 2016 our CEO David Levin gave an IMPACT Series presentation about the history and transformation of McGraw-Hill Education into a learning science company with a mission to unlock the full potential of each learner.

__A slide presentations created for a public presentation visually represents the Brand and perhaps this deck could use more attention

2016 10 04

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Phil Hill recognizes there are many unasked survey questions which leads one to wonder “Is OER at a tipping point and about to move beyond the high-potential but low adoption status quo?” The sooner that Faculty and Students actually use OER, the better, since, as with any ‘new’ consumer product, personal experiences using OER will inform the way forward – Emerging Demographics incl. Loyal OER users versus those who have tried OER and found reasons to opt out – etc _

Phil Hill - About That Cengage OER Survey

Phil Hill – About That Cengage OER Survey

mfeldstein.com

Last month Cengage Learning released a white paper titled “Open Educational Resources (OER) and the Evolving Higher Education Landscape” where the headline called out expected increases in OER adoption:

Open Educational Resources (OER) in higher education have the potential to triple in use as primary courseware over the next five years, from 4 percent to 12 percent, according to a survey of more than 500 faculty by Cengage Learning. In addition, the use of OER for supplemental learning materials may nearly quadruple in size, from 5 percent to 19 percent.

The 4 percent adoption of OER as primary courseware aligns with the Babson Survey Research Group (BSRG) finding of 5.3% using open textbooks (yes, we’re assuming the terms are interchangeable at least for the survey results). But the expectation that OER adoption may triple for primary usage and quadruple for supplemental is new. The BSRG did not estimate market growth – they just identified perceptions and barriers.

2016 10 04

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BOOKMARKS / ADDITIONAL ARTICLES AND RESEARCH  2016 10 01  to  2016 10 14

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BOOKMARKS / ADDITIONAL ARTICLES AND RESEARCH  2016 10 01-14
Maclean’s among magazines hit by Rogers media overhaul | Toronto Star
Maclean’s among magazines hit by Rogers media overhaul | Toronto Star
Redbird Advanced Learning, McGraw-Hill Education, Learning Science and Advanced Technology, Digital Education, Stanford University,
Redbird Advanced Learning
McGraw-Hill Education Acquires Redbird Advanced Learning, A Digital Personalized Learning Provider
McGraw-Hill Education acquires fourth edtech company since 2013
MIT OpenCourseWare MIT Open CourseWare
MIT OpenCourseWare | Free Online Course Materials
About OCW | MIT OpenCourseWare | Free Online Course Materials
About MIT OpenCourseWare – YouTube
AIGA Design Archives
AIGA Design Archives
Moleskine Turns Paper Into Big Profit for Private-Equity Owner – WSJ
Moleskine Turns Paper Into Big Profit for Private-Equity Owner – WSJ
Evernote – Moleskine ®
Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund
Home – Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund
News releases – Media Room
General_Public – News & Events – Ryerson University
Islamic Design Workbook Eric Broug
Thames & Hudson USA – Book – Islamic Design Workbook
Pearson Survey – Digital appetite vs. what’s on the table | Pearson
Digital appetite vs. what’s on the table | Pearson
Pearson Survey Reveals Professors See Benefits for Students, Opportunity to Improve Education System with Digital Course Materials
Digital appetite vs. what’s on the table | Pearson
Phil Hill Cengage Survey
About That Cengage OER Survey -e-Literate
Open Up Resources Pressing The Reset Button On OER – Reinventing K-12 Learning – Education Week
Pressing The Reset Button On OER – Reinventing K-12 Learning – Education Week
R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company Completes Separation Plan
R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company Completes Separation Plan | Benzinga
McGraw-Hill David Levin’s Presentation at the 2016 IMPACT Speaker Series hosted by Georgia Tech
Reconnecting the Soul of our Business… and Going Digital Too!
Peter Reynolds, The Water Princess
Behind a new picture book is one village girl’s journey for water – The Boston Globe
Are online access codes the new textbook monopoly? By Laura Devaney
Are online access codes the new textbook monopoly? – eCampus News
Open Educational Practices: A literature review By Heather M. Ross
Reading Course Paper – August 14, 2015.docx – Google Docs
#573: Why Textbook Prices Keep Climbing – Planet Money
#573: Why Textbook Prices Keep Climbing – Planet Money
Keith Hampson Seven (Not-So-Obvious) Trends in Digital Higher Education
Seven (Not-So-Obvious) Trends in Digital Higher Education
Design Matters – Higher Education Management
Design Matters: Leveraging Design to Enhance Digital Learning – Computing & Communications Services Desire2Learn Capture Portal
Why design matters in digital higher education – Higher Education Management
Keith Hampson, PhD | LinkedIn
ValoreBooks Review – The Best Textbook Rental Company? – The Gazette Review
ValoreBooks Review – The Best Textbook Rental Company? – The Gazette Review
Opening Up Slovenia, Opening Up Slovenia Initiative
Opening Up Slovenia | Opening Up Slovenia Initiative
Opening Up Slovenia | Opening Up Slovenia Initiative
OpeningupSlovenia launch and press conference | Opening Up Slovenia
Events | Opening Up Slovenia
Associated institutions | Opening Up Slovenia
Strategic Advisory Council | Opening Up Slovenia
Steering Committee | Opening Up Slovenia
News Archive | Opening Up Slovenia
Building on Best Practices | Opening Up Slovenia
Addressing the Communication | Opening Up Slovenia
Initial Strategy and Objectives | Opening Up Slovenia
The idea | Opening Up Slovenia
Opening Up Slovenia | Opening Up Slovenia Initiative
Opening Up Slovenia | Opening Up Slovenia Initiative
Opening Up Slovenia | Opening Up Slovenia Initiative
http://ouslovenia.net
Opening up Slovenia (@OpenupSLO) | Twitter
United Nations News Centre – Slovenia sets sight on educating youth for digital transformation, President tells UN Assembly
United Nations News Centre – Slovenia sets sight on educating youth for digital transformation, President tells UN Assembly
http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=54982#.V-KvrTX2Mfh
Opening up Slovenia on Twitter: “President tells UN Assembly about Open Education #UnitedNations #UNESCO #OER @OpenEduEU @okfnedu https://t.co/QG6bwDEIJW https://t.co/cXFZZMSxD8”
Open Movement Canada: our community
Open Movement Canada: our community
Wacom MobileStudio Pro | Wacom
Wacom MobileStudio Pro | Wacom
Wacom’s MobileStudio Pro Is a Full-Fledged Win10 Tablet | Digital Trends
Open Textbooks The Current State of Play American Council on Education
Quick-Hits-Open-Textbooks.pdf
Quick-Hits-Open-Textbooks.pdf
About
Quick Hits: Open Textbooks: The Current State of Play
Open Textbooks: The Current State of Play – YouTube
NCPIRG @ UNC on Twitter: “An effective way to combat student debt is through open education resources! #TextbookBroke #TeamOER https://t.co/odbye1zjOh”
Nielsen PubTrack Higher Ed Textbooks
Pubtrack Higher Education 2014 with Carl Kulo, US Director of Researc…
Map of the Internet — Quartz
Map of the Internet — Quartz
Unsplash High-Resolution Photos
Unsplash | High-Resolution Photos
Team | Crew
Manifesto | Crew
Crew Pro
Submissions
Press Kit & Resources | Crew
What does Unsplash cost? | Crew Backstage
Unsplash | High-Resolution Photos
http://unsplash.com
3 years of Unsplash | 1095 days later
Work at Crew – Hiring
Tag Unsplash | Unsplash
Unsplash | High-Resolution Photos
Join | Unsplash
Login | Unsplash
photo-1472214103451-9374bd1c798e (JPEG Image, 7932 × 5291 pixels) – Scaled (17%)
Photo by Robert Lukeman | Unsplash | Unsplash
download.jpg
photo-1473968512647-3e447244af8f (JPEG Image, 5472 × 3648 pixels) – Scaled (25%)
Unsplash (@unsplash) | Twitter
FAQ | Unsplash
Your Body Text Is Too Small – Medium
Your Body Text Is Too Small – Medium
Copyright Alliance
Home – copyrightalliance
Rafter 360 Sudden Demise of Start-Up Textbook Supplier Leaves Small Colleges to Scramble
Sudden Demise of Start-Up Textbook Supplier Leaves Small Colleges to Scramble – The Chronicle of Higher Education
Cal State Fullerton’s Math Department Has More Problems Than Overpriced, Mandatory Textbook
Cal State Fullerton’s Math Department Has More Problems Than Overpriced, Mandatory Textbooks | OC Weekly
Rutgers University, Open and Affordable Textbook Project OAT,
RU’s Open and Affordable Textbook Project – Piscataway NJ News – TAPinto
Rutgers University Libraries Provide Relief for Soaring Textbook Costs | Media Relations
Analysis: Why RR Donnelley Just Split Up Into Three Separate Companies – Printing Impressions
Analysis: Why RR Donnelley Just Split Up Into Three Separate Companies – Printing Impressions
Brian Jacobs Sept 2014 OPINION: Why Can’t OER Enjoy the Same Success as Open Source Software
Why Can’t OER Enjoy the Same Success as Open Source Software? | EdSurge News
Don Gorges journal of the BCcampus ‘Adopting Open Textbooks’ Workshop 2015 | Don Gorges
Don Gorges journal of the BCcampus ‘Adopting Open Textbooks’ Workshop 2015 | Don Gorges
Pearson Summit Miami 2015 Attendees
The Summit
BCcampus 2014 Faculty Survey about Open Textbook Adoption | Don Gorges
BCcampus 2014 Faculty Survey about Open Textbook Adoption | Don Gorges
It’s not that we’re trying to destroy publishers. It’s just that we don’t care.” Tweet by TJ Bliss
TJ Bliss on Twitter: “”It’s not that we’re trying to destroy publishers. It’s just that we don’t care.” @cgreen #oeglobal”
Fact Checking How Much Do College Students Actually Pay For Textbooks? 2015 > 2016 Phil Hill | Don Gorges
Fact Checking How Much Do College Students Actually Pay For Textbooks? 2015 > 2016 Phil Hill | Don Gorges
Student PIRGs WPIRG – Waterloo – UW advocacy group loses funding
About U.S. PIRG Education Fund | U.S. PIRG Education Fund
Our Leadership | Student PIRGs
Student PIRGs | Together we can make change happen
The Student PIRGs | Project Gutenberg Central – eBooks | Read eBooks online
History – OPIRG Provincial Network
OPIRG Provincial Network – Student Interest, Social Justice
OPIRG Provincial Network – Student Interest, Social Justice
APIRG | APIRG
PIRGs | APIRG
By-law+04-15.pdf
WPIRG POlicy Manual – Policy+Manual.pdf
Annual Report 2015-16 – Annual-Report-2015-16.pdf
Structure — wpirg
Here’s my WPIRG Pay Stub – Medium
YOUR WPIRG — wpirg
Welcome our new Board of Directors! — wpirg
BCcampus Open Textbook Project History 2012 – 2016 _ BC Families First Agenda
BCcampus Open Textbook Project History 2012 – 2016 _ BC Families First Agenda | Don Gorges
Physical mail marketing still has plenty to offer advertisers – Deepak Chopra Canada Post.
Physical mail marketing still has plenty to offer advertisers – The Globe and Mail
Physical Messages More Effective than Digital Ones, New Neuromarketing Study Finds | St. Joseph Communications
Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes . . . (Leaders Collection, 10-11-2016) – Higher Education Management
Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes . . . (Leaders Collection, 10-11-2016) – Higher Education Management
Delivering-Design-Led-Innovation.pdf
Delivering-Design-Led-Innovation.pdf
Alan Levine – Digital Media and Learning conference
Alan Levine
Michael Farmer – Ad industry’s new business cycle is now a ‘loser’s game’ warns top consultant at Secrets of Agency Excellence SAGE
Ad industry’s new business cycle is now a ‘loser’s game’ warns top consultant – Mumbrella
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt HMH, HMH Science Dimensions, K-12 science curriculum, Next Generation Science Standards NGSS
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt – Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Launches First K-12 Curricula Built from the Ground Up to Address Next Generation Science Standards
HMH Science Dimensions | NGSS Science Curriculum
VitalSource – What would happen if learning materials were provided to all students on or before the first day of class? Mike Hale, October 10, 2016
What would happen if learning materials were provided to all students on or before the first day of class?
Robin DeRosa Open puts the public in public education – ClintLalonde.net
Open puts the public in public education – ClintLalonde.net
BCcampus hosts its first Open Education Strategy Forum | BCcampus OpenEd Resources
BCcampus hosts its first Open Education Strategy Forum | BCcampus OpenEd Resources
OpenStax, OER Commons partner on community hubs
OpenStax, OER Commons partner on community hubs
OpenStax | OER Commons
How to Use the OpenStax Community Hub | Unit 1 | OER Commons
How to Use the OpenStax Community Hub | OER Commons
OpenStax | OER Commons
OpenStax | OER Commons
OpenStax | OER Commons
How to Use the OpenStax Community Hub | OER Commons
Shared Resources | OER Commons
OpenStax, OER Commons partner on community hubs
OpenStax | OER Commons
OpenStax, OER Commons partner on community hubs
http://news.rice.edu/2016/10/11/openstax-oer-commons-partner-on-community-hubs/#.V_zvUZPTFnM.twitter
Learning in the Digital Age – The Conference Board of Canada
Learning in the Digital Age
Learning in the Digital Age
Executive Summary – Learning in the Digital Age
FlashStock
FlashStock
Rich Bassett, St. Joseph Communications Acquires Bassett Direct
St. Joseph Communications Acquires Personalized Direct Marketing Firm Bassett Direct « Bassett Direct – It’s personal.
Wiley Selects Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink® Platform
Wiley Selects Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink® Platform to Manage Automated Collection of Page, Color, and Custom Cover Charges – Copyright Clearance Center
Why Free Is Not the Future of Digital Content in Education | WIRED Mary Cullinane, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Why Free Is Not the Future of Digital Content in Education | WIRED
TCC Takes Z-Degrees to the Next Level With Adaptive Learning
TCC Takes Z-Degrees to the Next Level With Adaptive Learning | EdSurge News
Dian Schaffhauser – Laptops, Desktops Most Common Form of Instructional Tech in the Classroom — Campus Technology
Laptops, Desktops Most Common Form of Instructional Tech in the Classroom — Campus Technology
Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology Teaching with Technology Survey
CAM_1608DG.pdf
The Alchemy of Color and Chemical Change in Medieval Manuscripts
VIDEO: The Alchemy of Color | The Getty Iris
The Alchemy of Color and Chemical Change in Medieval Manuscripts – YouTube
Exploring more frameworks to understand OER/OEP – David Jones
Exploring more frameworks to understand OER/OEP – The Weblog of (a) David Jones
Which Content Management Systems Do Canadian Universities Use?
Which Content Management Systems Do Canadian Universities Use?
Drupal – Open Source CMS | Drupal.org
Drupal – Open Source CMS | Drupal.org

 

2016 10 01  to  2016 10 14

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BCcampus Exploring Faculty Use of OER at BC Institutions: OER Survey 2014-15

January 18, 2016
BCcampus Research Report
Prepared by:
Rajiv S. Jhangiani, Ph.D., Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Rebecca Pitt, Ph.D., OER Hub
Christina Hendricks, Ph.D., University of British Columbia
Jessie Key, Ph.D., Vancouver Island University
Clint Lalonde, M.A., BCcampus

New Study: Exploring Faculty Use of OER at BC Institutions

How do faculty in British Columbia use Open Educational Resources (OER)? What are some of the ways in which they are using OER, and what are some of the barriers they face when using OER? A new research paper published today by BCcampus looks at some of these questions.

Led by the the 2015 BC Open Textbook Faculty Fellows (Rajiv S. Jhangiani, Ph.D., KPU, Christina Hendricks, Ph.D., UBC and Jessie Key, Ph.D., VIU) and in collaboration with the OER Hub (Rebecca Pitt, Ph.D.), this research project examines the use of OER by post-secondary faculty in British Columbia, including their motivations and perceptions, as well as what factors help to enable or act as challenges for OER use and adaptation.

Although the findings provide a snapshot of the BC post-secondary system as a whole, the research also explore similarities and differences in OER use among faculty across three types of institution in British Columbia: research-intensive universities, teaching-intensive universities, and colleges/institutes.

purposes-for-using-oer-bccampus-faculty-survey

Top reasons why BC post-secondary faculty use OER, grouped by type of institution

Key Findings

Among the reports 11 key findings are;

  • While faculty at all three institutional types (research-intensive universities, teaching-intensive universities, and colleges/institutes) reported similar adoption patterns of OER, faculty at research-intensive universities were more likely to adapt and create OER than faculty at teaching-intensive universities or colleges/institutes.
  • A majority of faculty perceive OER to be comparable or superior in quality to traditional, proprietary materials; however, faculty who have adopted OER rate the quality of OER significantly higher than those who have not adopted OER.
  • The barriers of locating high-quality, relevant and up-to-date OER were reported to be significantly lower by faculty at research-intensive universities than by faculty at both teaching-intensive universities or colleges/institutes.
  • Quantitatively, lack of institutional support for use of OER was reported as a more significant barrier by faculty at colleges/institutes than faculty at either teaching-intensive universities or research-intensive universities. However, a qualitative analysis of open-ended responses shows that faculty at all types of institutions face institutional barriers such as lack of administrative, staff, or department support for their use of OER.
  • Two-thirds of respondents were unaware of any relevant institutional policy concerning OER. Faculty at teaching-intensive universities and colleges/institutes reported more encouragement to use OER than those at research-intensive universities.

The report contains an additional 6 findings.

Recommendations

In addition to the key findings, the research also makes a number of recommendations aimed at senior institutional administrators on how to support faculty wishing to use OER in their teaching & learning practice. These recommendations include;

  •  First and foremost, institutions should raise awareness of the existence of OER; where to find these materials, how to review their quality, and how to adopt OER for courses. Awareness should also be raised of the pedagogical and financial benefits of OER to students (e.g., cost savings, flexible and permanent access, course performance), instructors (e.g., ability to adapt materials, improved learning outcomes, OER creation as course assignments), and institutions (e.g., enrollment, retention, completion).
  • Institutional support for adaptation and adoption is required to ensure successful adoption of OER. Teaching and Learning Centres as well as Libraries can provide expertise and support on best practices for OER adoption and adaption. Further education is recommended on copyright laws and Creative Commons licenses, preferably through the support of the Library and/or the Institution’s Copyright Office.
  • Internal funding should be provided to support the development or redevelopment of courses to incorporate OER (e.g. OER Resource Grants at Simon Fraser University).
  • Institutional policies concerning OER should be developed and disseminated to help raise awareness, dispel myths, and to encourage members of the university community to adopt open educational practices. These university policies should ideally be tied to the university mission and academic plan.
  • The creation and adaptation of OER should be appropriately recognized as curricular innovation and service to the academic profession during the tenure, promotion, and reappointment process.

The report contains 5 additional recommendations.

Download the full report PDF | Word.

https://bccampus.ca/files/2016/01/BCFacultyUseOfOER_final.pdf

Excerpt from the Report-pdf

Key Findings
1. While faculty at all three institutional types (research-intensive universities, teaching-intensive universities, and colleges/institutes) reported similar adoption patterns of OER, faculty at research-intensive universities were more likely to adapt and create OER than faculty at teaching-intensive universities or colleges/institutes.
2. Faculty who score higher on the personality trait of openness (to experience) were more likely to both adapt and create OER.
3. Regardless of institutional type, the top three reasons faculty reported for using OER were for ideas and inspiration, to supplement existing coursework, and to prepare for teaching.
4. The most frequently used types of OER were videos, images, and open textbooks.
5. A majority of faculty perceive OER to be comparable or superior in quality to traditional, proprietary materials; however, faculty who have adopted OER rate the quality of OER significantly higher than those who have not adopted OER.
6. The barriers of locating high-quality, relevant and up-to-date OER were reported to be significantly lower by faculty at research-intensive universities than by faculty at both teaching-intensive universities or colleges/institutes.
7. Quantitatively, lack of institutional support for use of OER was reported as a more significant barrier by faculty at colleges/institutes than faculty at either teaching-intensive universities or research-intensive universities. However, a qualitative analysis of open-ended responses shows that faculty at all types of institutions face institutional barriers such as lack of administrative, staff, or department support for their use of OER.
8. The availability of up-to-date resources from a reputable producer was reported to be relatively more important by faculty at teaching-intensive universities and colleges/institutes than those at research-intensive universities.
9. On average, respondents agreed that the use of OER in the classroom benefited their students and had a positive impact on their teaching practice.
10. Whereas two-thirds of respondents believe that their students save money by using OER, only one-third of respondents believed that their institution did.
11. Two-thirds of respondents were unaware of any relevant institutional policy concerning OER. Faculty at teaching-intensive universities and colleges/institutes reported more encouragement to use OER than those at research-intensive universities.
These findings are expanded on in this report.

Recommendations
Based on the research findings the following recommendations are suggested to reduce the barriers of using OER in courses and to successfully advocate for mainstream adoption of OER:
1. Institutional commitment to OER. First and foremost, institutions should raise awareness of the existence of OER; where to find these materials, how to review their quality, and how to adopt OER for courses. Awareness should also be raised of the pedagogical and financial benefits of OER to students (e.g., cost savings, flexible and permanent access, course performance), instructors (e.g., ability to adapt materials, improved learning outcomes, OER creation as course assignments), and institutions (e.g., enrolment, retention, completion). Awareness can be raised through workshops, panels (e.g., during Open Education week or other designated professional development periods), and other information sessions. These efforts might be spearheaded by institutional working groups that include students, librarians, faculty representatives, teaching and learning centre staff, administrators, and other internal stakeholders (e.g., Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Open Studies Working Group).
2. Support for adaptation and adoption is required to ensure successful adoption of OER. Teaching and Learning Centres as well as Libraries can provide expertise and support on best practices for OER adoption and adaption. Further education is recommended on copyright laws and Creative
10 Four participants noted that this question was phrased ambiguously.
EXPLORING FACULTY USE OF OER AT BC POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS| 33
Commons licenses, preferably through the support of the Library and/or the Institution’s Copyright Office.
3. Sufficient time to create, adapt, and adopt OER is a significant barrier to using OER in a course. Institutions and departments should provide release time or paid educational leave to faculty to create, adapt, and/or adopt OER.
4. Internal funding should be provided to support the development or redevelopment of courses to incorporate OER (e.g. OER Resource Grants at Simon Fraser University11) as well as the development of ancillary materials (e.g. video tutorials12, question banks13, etc). Investing in the development of ancillary resources eliminates a major barrier to open textbook adoption for faculty who rely heavily on publisher-provided resources.
5. Institutional policies concerning OER should be developed and disseminated to help raise awareness, dispel myths, and to encourage members of the university community to adopt open educational practices. These university policies should ideally be tied to the university mission and academic plan.
6. The creation and adaptation of OER should be appropriately recognized as curricular innovation and service to the academic profession during the tenure, promotion, and reappointment process at research-intensive universities. Without this recognition, the benefits of open educational practices will be slow to accrue at research-intensive universities.
7. Faculty should be encouraged and incentivized to review open textbooks that are available in their areas of specialization. Reviewing open textbooks helps raise awareness of their existence and negates perceptions of inferior quality while also serving as a gateway to adoption and adaptation. The BC OTP offers a $250 honorarium to qualified faculty reviewers14; however, institutions could augment this support or otherwise recognize these efforts.
8. Faculty should be encouraged to pilot the use of OER within their courses, whether as a replacement for a paid, proprietary resource or even as a supplementary resource. These might include, for example, materials from MIT OpenCourseWare15, open textbooks from the BC OTP16, or open source software like R17. A pilot adoption of an open textbook may also be a viable approach in cases of multi-section courses in which textbooks are selected by committee. Because students in participating pilot sections will not incur any textbook costs, the fear that students switching sections or repeating a course will have to purchase another textbook will be allayed.
9. Faculty should be encouraged to design and assign non-disposable course assignments that, for example, involve students in the creation and adaptation of OER (e.g. the University of California at
11 See http://www.sfu.ca/oergrants.html
12 See http://www.neuroanatomy.ca/
13 See http://thatpsychprof.com/the-great-psychology-testbank-sprint/
14 See http://open.bccampus.ca/call-for-proposals/call-for-reviewers-2/
15 See ocw.mit.edu
16 See http://open.bccampus.ca/
17 See https://www.r-project.org/
EXPLORING FACULTY USE OF OER AT BC POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS| 34

Davis’ ChemWiki project18). These efforts require education and support through, for example, professional development workshops offered by the university teaching and learning centre.
10. Faculty as well as staff at teaching and learning centres should be encouraged to design and conduct research to investigate the impact of OER adoption on educational outcomes such as course performance, program completion, and student retention. Results from this research should be disseminated widely within the institution to support evidence-based decision-making concerning OER policies and practices. Internal funding to support this research is also highly desirable.

Conclusion
Adopting open educational practices holds great promise in terms significant cost savings, innovative pedagogy, and improved educational outcomes. The results of this survey and the accompanying recommendations provide a road map for institutions not only in British Columbia, but elsewhere who are looking to reap these benefits.

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November 12, 2014

Do Open Educational Resources make a difference in the classroom? An online survey developed by BCcampus and U.K.-based OER Research Hub is being used to collect data to quantify the efficacy of OER

Open Educational Resources have been popular topics for BCcampus; we’ve explored the economics of open, the intersection of open education and technology, and additional relevant posts. Collaborating with the OER Research Hub to gather empirical evidence about the efficacy of open education provides an opportunity to accurately analyze the challenges facing the faculty and administration throughout the province regarding the Open Textbook project.

BCcampus was chosen to provide support for the Open Textbook project by The BC Ministry of Advanced Education. The goal of the project is to help reduce costs to students and make higher education more accessible by creating a collection of open textbooks. The initial project was to create textbooks to support the top 40 subject areas in the province with the highest enrolment, and in 2014 was expanded to include an additional 20 textbooks to target trades and skills training.

The Open Educational Resources Research Hub was created to identify and quantify the value of openness, answering the question, “What is the impact of OER on learning and teaching practices?” The project is supported by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and is based out of the Open University’s Institute of Educational Technology. The OER Research Hub is currently comprised of seven individuals, and the team was carefully selected for their ability to apply the academic and research proficiency required to ensure the success of the project. “There are many great projects creating Open Educational Resources, but not a huge amount of research on the impact of OER,” said Dr. Beck Pitt, research assistant at the OER Research Hub. “Our methodologies enable us to conduct the comparative research across different contexts and is structured by eleven hypotheses focused on a range of impacts of OER.”

To compile data to better understand the needs of the faculty and students in B.C., an online survey has been created and approved through the ethical advisory board at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, led by Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani. The survey will be used to provide faculty across the province a voice in the project and the opportunity to contribute to its success.

The survey will examine the efficacy of OER, providing empirical data to better understand the barriers to OER adoption in the classroom and how the faculty and administration feel about the process. The timing of the survey is appropriate, as the research is expected to uncover opportunities that BCcampus can address and correct while there is time left in the project.

“We’ll have a pool of data we can add to other sources of data, from projects like OpenStax and Siyavula, that we can aggregate to get a global snapshot as to where open educational resources are,” said Clint Lalonde, BCcampus Senior Manager of Open Education. “Collaborating with OER Research Hub gives us the opportunity to ensure our project has an impact not only within B.C., but outside of the province as well.”

The survey will be made available to:

  • Anyone who has reviewed a copy of a textbook for BCcampus
  • Anyone who has adopted a textbook
  • Members of the BCcampus mailing lists
  • Visitors to bccampus.ca

Survey participants will be entered in a draw to win one of ten Amazon Kindles, fully stocked with a selection of current titles from the B.C Open Textbook project.

 

BCcampus Open textbook adoption Faculty survey Nov 2014

http://survey.bccampus.ca/index.php/775343/lang-en

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Open textbook adoption: Faculty survey

This online survey of BC post-secondary faculty is part of a project which is investigating how faculty think about and use open textbooks and other open educational resources, as well as the factors that facilitate or inhibit their adoption in the classroom.

Please note that all of the questions in this survey are optional.

CONSENT FORM

Principal Investigator: Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani, Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Co-investigators: Clint Lalonde (BCcampus), Dr. Beck Pitt (OER Research Hub/The Open University, UK), Dr. Christina Hendricks (University of British Columbia), and Dr. Jessie Key (Vancouver Island University)

REB Application #: 2014-046

This consent form explains the research study you are being asked to join. Please review this form carefully and ask any questions about the study before you agree to join. You may also ask questions at any time after joining the study. See below for persons to contact.

Voluntary participation:

Your participation in this research project is completely voluntary. All questions in the online survey are optional and you may withdraw from the research study at any time by closing your browser. Clicking “Next” below indicates that you have read and understood this form and consent to participate in this research.

You should ask the principal investigator listed below any questions you may have about this research study. You may ask him questions in the future if you do not understand something that is being done. Consenting to participate in this research project does not waive your rights to legal recourse in the event of research related harm.

Purpose of the study:

This online survey of BC post-secondary instructors is part of a project which is investigating how faculty think about and use open textbooks and other open educational resources, as well as the factors that facilitate or inhibit their adoption in the classroom.

Procedures:

The online survey includes closed- and open-ended questions that gather information about your experience with open educational resources. The survey should take around 20 minutes to complete.

Risks of harm/discomforts/inconvenience:

There are no risks associated with participating in this research study.

Benefits:

Your answers will help us build a picture of how instructors in BC use open educational resources for learning and teaching, including the factors that facilitate or inhibit their adoption in the classroom. Our research data will help educators around the world make more informed decisions about the adoption of open textbooks and other open educational resources.

Compensation:

There is no compensation offered in exchange for your participation in this study; however, you may enter your name into a draw to receive one of ten Kindle e-readers.

Confidentiality:

By answering the survey questions, you are granting the research team use of your data for research and dissemination purposes. Although you are not asked to provide your name, in some cases your answers to a few demographic questions about your academic background and the institution at which you work could indirectly identify you. Please note, however, that you may choose not to answer these questions and that all of the questions in this survey are optional.

At the end of the survey you will be invited to provide contact details should you wish to participate in further research. This is entirely optional and will be done using a separate web-form that is not linked to your responses to the questions in the survey.

The results of this study may be presented at conferences and published in academic journals; however only group averages and trends will be reported. The data collected during this study will be stored securely (using password protected and encrypted data files) and accessible only to the principal investigator and the co-investigators. Our data protection policy complies with British Columbia’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and the UK’s Data Protection Act (1988). At this time there is no plan to destroy the data as it may be used for future analyses, including investigations of changes over time in attitudes towards open textbooks and other open educational resources.

Persons to contact:

If you want to talk to anyone about this research study because you think you have not been treated fairly or think you have been hurt by joining the study, or if you have any other questions about the study, you should the principal investigator, Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani, at 604-599-3253 or rajiv.jhangiani@kpu.ca or the Kwantlen Office of Research and Scholarship at 604-599-2373.

Once you have read and understood this consent form please click “Next” below to indicate your willingness to take part in the study.

There are 38 questions in this survey.

What is your age?

What is your gender?

What is your first spoken language?

Which institution(s) do you work at?

What is your highest educational qualification?

What kind of teaching do you do?

Which of the following apply to you?

For how many years have you been teaching?

—————————————————————————————————–

In which of these ways, if any, have you used or created Open Educational Resources?

Which, if any, of the following types of open educational resources have you used for teaching/training?

Have you used, or are you using, BCcampus Open Textbooks?

If you are aware of BCcampus Open Textbooks, how did you learn about them?

For which of the following purposes have you used open educational resources in the context of your teaching/training?

In the context of your role as instructor, what has been your experience of using OER at your institution?

Which challenges, if any, do you most often face in using open educational resources?

Which of the following factors would make you more likely to select a particular resource when searching for open educational content?

Teaching with Open Educational Resources – Based on your experiences as a instructor, to what extent do you agree with the following statements?

 

Based on your experiences as an instructor, how would you rate the quality of OER when compared with traditional, proprietary materials?

Do you believe that your students have saved money by using open educational resources?

Do you think that your institution benefits financially by using open educational resources?

To what extent do you agree with the following statements about the impact on your teaching practice of your using open educational resources?

What kinds of practices and policies, if any, does your institution have in relation to open educational resources?

Are you aware of any changes to policy and/or practice that have taken place at your institution as a result of participation in OER pilots and/or programs?

In the context of your role as instructor, what kinds of policies would help you to be more open?

 

In the context of your role as instructor, what barriers, if any, have you encountered when using OER in your institution?

Do you recognise the logo above?

How important is open licensing to you when using resources in your teaching?

What does “openness” in education mean to you?

Do you share any of your teaching materials publicly?

Please explain the reasons behind your answer to the previous question: Why do you share your teaching materials publicly (or not), and why do you/do you not allow them to be revised an reused?

Are there any institutional or policy barriers that affect your decision whether and how to share your teaching materials publicly? If so, please explain:

In which of these ways, if any, have you accessed the Internet during the past three months?

Which of these things have you done in the last year?

Here are a number of personality traits that may or may not apply to you. Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. You should rate the extent to which the pair of traits applies to you, even if one characteristic applies more strongly than the other.

—————————————————————————————————–

1

About You

What is your age?

Only numbers may be entered in this field.

Answer

What is your gender?

Check any that apply

Male

Female

Transgender

Other:

What is your first spoken language?

Check any that apply

English

French

Other:

—————————————————————————————————–

2

About Your Work

Which institution(s) do you work at?

Check any that apply

British Columbia Institute of Technology

Camosun College

Capilano University

College of New Caledonia

College of the Rockies

Douglas College

Emily Carr University of Art and Design

Justice Institute of British Columbia

Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Langara College

North Island College

Northern Lights College

Nicola Valley Institute of Technology

Northwest Community College

Okanagan College

Royal Roads University

Selkirk College

Simon Fraser University

Thompson Rivers University (inc. Open Learning)

University of British Columbia

University of the Fraser Valley

University of Northern British Columbia

University of Victoria

Vancouver Community College

Vancouver Island University

Yukon College

Prefer not to answer

Other:

What is your highest educational qualification?

Check any that apply

High School Diploma

Attended College

Associates Degree (Two Year)

Bachelors Degree

Masters Degree

PhD or Professional Doctorate

No Formal Qualification

Other:

What kind of teaching do you do? (Check any that apply)

Check any that apply

Full-time face-to-face teaching

Part-time face-to-face teaching

Full-time distance/online teaching

Part-time distance/online teaching

Full-time blended (face-to-face and distance/online) teaching

Part-time blended (face-to-face and distance/online) teaching

Work-based training

Other:

Which of the following apply to you? (Check all that apply)

Check any that apply

Classroom Instructor

Department Chair

Technology Integration Specialist

Technology Director

Curriculum Director

Administrator

Other:

For how many years have you been teaching?

Check any that apply

Under 1 year

1 to 3 years

4 to 6 years

7 to 10 years

Over 10 years

—————————————————————————————————–

3

Your Use of Open Educational Resources

Open Educational Resources are teaching, learning or research materials that are in the public domain or released with an intellectual property license that allows for free use, adaptation, and distribution.

Open educational resources can be in many formats, including open textbooks, complete courses and small assets such as videos. Many free online resources are open educational resources.

In which of these ways, if any, have you used or created Open Educational Resources?

Check any that apply

I have used open educational resources

I have adapted open educational resources to fit my needs

I have created open educational resources for study or teaching

I have created resources myself and published them on an open licence

I have added a resource to a repository

I have added comments to a repository regarding the quality of a resource

I have added comments to a repository suggesting ways of using a resource

I have not used or created open educational resources

Other:

Which, if any, of the following types of open educational resources have you used for teaching/training?

Check any that apply

Open textbooks

Whole course

Elements of a course (e.g. a module/unit)

Videos

Audio podcasts

Images

Infographics

Interactive games

Lectures

Lesson plans

Tutorials

Quizzes

E-books

Data sets

Learning tools, instruments and plug-ins

Other:

Have you used, or are you using, BCcampus Open Textbooks?

Yes

No

If you are aware of BCcampus Open Textbooks, how did you learn about them?

Answer

If you have not used a BCcampus open textbook, which of the following reasons contributed to this decision (select all that apply):

Check any that apply

No textbook available for my discipline/course

Poor quality of open textbook

Lack of additional instructor resources (such as image gallery, test bank, or instructor manual)

Lack of support from colleagues/Department to change textbook

Lack of time to transition to new textbook

Other:

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4

Your Experience with Open Educational Resources

For which of the following purposes have you used open educational resources in the context of your teaching/training?

Check any that apply

To prepare for my teaching/training

To get new ideas and inspiration

To supplement my existing lessons or coursework

As “assets” (e.g. images or text extracts) within a classroom lesson

To give to learners as compulsory self-study materials

To give to learners as optional self-study materials

To provide e-learning materials to online learners

To compare them with my own teaching/training materials in order to assess the quality of my materials

To broaden the range of my teaching methods

To broaden the range of resources available to my learners

To make my teaching more culturally diverse [or responsive]

To enhance my professional development

To stay up-to-date in a subject or topic area

To learn about a new topic

To engage my students more fully in a topic area

To connect with instructors or learners who have similar interests (e.g. by reading comments they have posted about resources)

To interest hard-to-engage learners

Other:

In the context of your role as instructor, what has been your experience of using OER at your institution?

Answer

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5

Factors that Influence Using Open Educational Resources

Which challenges, if any, do you most often face in using open educational resources?

Check any that apply

Overcoming technology problems when downloading resources

Knowing where to find resources

Finding suitable resources in my subject area

Finding resources of sufficiently high quality

Finding resources that are up-to-date

Finding resources that are relevant to my local context

Getting work colleagues/managers to accept the use of open educational resources

Not being skilled enough to edit resources to suit my own context

Not knowing whether I have permission to use, change or modify resources

Not having enough time to look for suitable resources

Not having connections with open educational resource-using peers who could be a source of support

Missing/needing the support of a tutor or instructor to help me work through open course materials

Not knowing how to use the resources in the classroom

Not having enough time/opportunities to experiment with using open educational resources in the classroom

Lacking institutional support for my use of open educational resources

Resources not being aligned with professional standards or regulation

Other:

Which of the following factors would make you more likely to select a particular resource when searching for open educational content?

Check any that apply

Evidence of interest in that resource (e.g. lots of downloads)

The resource being recently created, uploaded or updated

The resource being easy to download

A description of learning objectives or outcomes being provided

The resource being created/uploaded by a reputable/trusted institution or person

The resource having a Creative Commons license

The resource having an open license allowing adaptation

The length/complexity of the resource

Use of interactive or multi-media content (e.g. video or quiz) in the resource

Positive user ratings or comments about the resource

Personal recommendation

Having previously used this resource successfully

The resource being relevant to my particular interests/needs

The resource having a catchy title or attractive image(s)

Being required to use a resource for a project or study task

The resource having previously been used with students

A detailed description of the resource content being provided

Other:

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6

Teaching with Open Educational Resources

Based on your experiences as a instructor, to what extent do you agree with the following statements?

“Use of Open Educational Resources in the classroom…”

Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ participation in class discussions             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ interest in the subjects taught             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ satisfaction with the learning experience             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Leads to improved students’ grades             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Builds learners’ confidence             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Develops learners’ increased independence and self-reliance             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Allows me to better accommodate diverse learners’ needs             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ engagement with lesson content             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ experimentation with new ways of learning             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases collaboration and/or peer-support among learners             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ enthusiasm for future study             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Leads to learners becoming interested in a wider range of subjects than before they used OER             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Please provide evidence, or tell us more about any experience, which supports your responses to the previous question’s statements.

Answer

Based on your experiences as an instructor, how would you rate the quality of OER when compared with traditional, proprietary materials?

“The quality of OER when compared with traditional, proprietary materials is usually…”

Check any that apply

Comment only when you choose an answer.

Significantly worse Make a comment on your choice here:

Slightly worse Make a comment on your choice here:

Comparable Make a comment on your choice here:

Slight better Make a comment on your choice here:

Significantly better Make a comment on your choice here:

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7

The Impact of Using Open Educational Resources

Do you believe that your students have saved money by using open educational resources?

Check any that apply

Yes

No

Don’t Know

Do you think that your institution benefits financially by using open educational resources?

Check any that apply

Yes

No

Don’t Know

To what extent do you agree with the following statements about the impact on your teaching practice of your using open educational resources?

Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I have broadened my coverage of the curriculum             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I use a broader range of teaching and learning methods             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I have improved information and communication technology skills             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I make use of a wider range of multimedia             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I make more use of culturally diverse resources             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I have a more up-to-date knowledge of my subject area             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I reflect more on the way that I teach             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I more frequently compare my own teaching with others             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I now use OER study to develop my teaching             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I collaborate more with colleagues             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Please provide evidence, or tell us more about any experience, which supports your responses to the previous question’s statements.

Answer

—————————————————————————————————–

8

Institutional Policies Concerning Open Educational Resources

What kinds of practices and policies, if any, does your institution have in relation to open educational resources?

Answer

Are you aware of any changes to policy and/or practice that have taken place at your institution as a result of participation in OER pilots and/or programs?

Check any that apply

Yes

No

Don’t Know

In the context of your role as instructor, what kinds of policies would help you to be more open?

Answer

In the context of your role as instructor, what barriers, if any, have you encountered when using OER in your institution?

Answer

—————————————————————————————————–

9

Open Licensing

“A license is a document that specifies what can and cannot be done with a work (whether sound, text, image or multimedia). It grants permissions and states restrictions. Broadly speaking, an open license is one which grants permission to access, re-use and redistribute a work with few or no restrictions.”

Open Definition (http://opendefinition.org/guide/)

Logo – Creative Commons double CC in circle

Do you recognise the logo above?

Check any that apply

I’ve never seen it

I’ve seen it but I don’t know what it means

I’ve seen it and I know what it means

How important is open licensing to you when using resources in your teaching?

Check any that apply

Very important

Important

Moderately important

Of little importance

Unimportant

—————————————————————————————————–

10

What does “openness” in education mean to you?

Answer

Do you share any of your teaching materials publicly?

Check any that apply

No, but I share them with colleagues or others when asked

No, I don’t share any of my teaching materials with anyone but students

Yes, they are publicly viewable and I put a license on them that allows them to be revised and reused

Yes, they are publicly viewable but I don’t have a license on them that allows them to be revised and reused

Other:

Please explain the reasons behind your answer to the previous question: Why do you share your teaching materials publicly (or not), and why do you/do you not allow them to be revised an reused?

Answer

Are there any institutional or policy barriers that affect your decision whether and how to share your teaching materials publicly? If so, please explain:

Answer

—————————————————————————————————–

11

About Your Use of Computers and the Internet

In which of these ways, if any, have you accessed the Internet during the past three months?

Check any that apply

Via an Internet-enabled mobile phone (smartphone)

Via a tablet computer or iPad

At home using a broadband connection

At home using a dial-up connection

Via a video game console

At work

At an educational institution

At a community facility (e.g. a library)

Via a commercial facility (e.g. cyber cafe)

Other:

Which of these things have you done in the last year?

Check any that apply

Sent an email

Written a document using word processing software (e.g. Word)

Used presentation software (e.g. Powerpoint)

Performed calculations with spreadsheet software (e.g. Excel)

Contributed to a Wiki (e.g. Wikipedia)

Published a blog post (e.g. WordPress, Blogger)

Shared an image online (e.g. Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest)

Posted on a microblogging platform (e.g. Twitter, Tumblr)

Took part in a videochat (e.g. Skype)

Contributed to an Internet forum

Contributed to a social network (e.g. Facebook, Google+, MySpace, Beebo)

Used cloud-based storage (e.g. Dropbox, Google Drive)

Shopped Online (e.g. eBay, Amazon)

Downloaded a Podcast (e.g. iTunes)

Downloaded a file using a torrent client (e.g. Bittorrent, UTorrent)

Filmed and uploaded video content

Used a learning management system to study or teach (e.g. Moodle, Blackboard)

Recorded and uploaded a podcast

—————————————————————————————————–

12

A Little More About You

Here are a number of personality traits that may or may not apply to you. Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. You should rate the extent to which the pair of traits applies to you, even if one characteristic applies more strongly than the other.

I see myself as:

Extraverted, enthusiastic. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Critical, quarrelsome. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Dependable, self-disciplined. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Anxious, easily upset. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Open to new experiences, complex. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Reserved, quiet. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Sympathetic, warm. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Disorganized, careless. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Calm, emotionally stable. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Conventional, uncreative. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

—————————————————————————————————–

13

Draw for an E-reader

Please enter your name and email address if you would like to be entered into the draw for one of ten Kindle E-readers.

Name

E-mail address

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Visual history of the Drafts of the Foundations for OER Strategy Development document

Foundations for OER Strategy Development – version 1.0 2015

Drafting Committee: Nicole Allen, Delia Browne, Mary Lou Forward, Cable Green and Alek Tarkowski

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This searchable background Research highlights all of the issues raised and visually tracks the comments, discussions and changes made in each of the Drafts through to the final Version

__July 13, 2015  Draft 1.2 Updated: full text with comments

__September 20, 2015  Draft 1.2 Updated: full text with comments

__November 18, 2015  Version 1.0  Final full text

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Comments Edits Draft Language Changes

Nicole Allen  We’re now winding down the editing process on this doc, so if there are issues you feel are unaddressed please speak now.    Draft 1.2 Updated: July 13, 2015

 

Nicole Allen
8:59 AM Aug 17
p.s. Stephen, it’s not just you, I resolve all comments into oblivion equally.🙂 Generally we leave threads open until other people comment or the drafting team has a chance to discuss a course of action (if any). We reply to explain our decision and if there are no additional comments, we resolve it to make space for other voices.
We’re now winding down the editing process on this doc, so if there are issues you feel are unaddressed please speak now.

 

 

SEE EDITS and CURRENT COMMENTS AUGUST 22

Updates below in copy ” Draft 1.2 Updated: 20 September, 2015

 

 

13:13 18 Jul

Cable Green

replaced with: “Ensuring educators have the legal rights to retain, reuse, revise, remix and redistribute educational resources as they determine – without having to ask permission.” // resolving this comment

Cable Green
1:20 PM Jul 18
Add: “Publicly funded educational resources should be openly licensed by default.”

 

  • Government Funding: Governments are the largest potential source for funding that can bring OER to scale. In many cases they are already spending money directly on course materials, or on programs that create course materials. We need strategies such as open license funding requirements (e.g.,ideally CC BY by default) that will redirect some or all of that money to OER. Publicly funded educational resources should be openly licensed by default.

 

Extent of OER Adoption Necessary to Consider the Movement a “Success”

David Wiley
11:20 AM Aug 18
Add: “Entire degree programs replace commercial textbooks with OER. New pedagogical approaches enabled by the 5R permissions of OER demonstrate superior learning outcomes and become popular among faculty

 

Movement Challenges
Nicole Allen
9:00 AM Aug 17

Delete: “Absence of Broad Standards: Other segments of the open movement have standardized models, such as the “green” and “gold” routes for Open Access or the 5 Star Open Data standard. The OER movement employs standardized open licenses, yet we still lack a single standard or unified message that is applicable around the globe. This is in part due to the diversity of the education sector, which spans education from infants to the elderly, and employs a variety of resources and tools. This is also due to a large variance between local and national autonomy of education, especially at primary and secondary levels, and variations in systems from country to country. Finally, use and reuse practices are crucial in education, as well as personalised approaches to learning – these don’t standardize easily. However, in order for OER to scale, some standards or standard pathways are needed.”

Nicole Allen
9:00 AM Aug 17
Add: “Lack of Consistent Models: Other movements in the “open” space have developed commonly understood models for implementation. For example there are the so-called “green” and “gold” routes to Open Access: self-archiving published articles in a repository and publishing directly in an Open Access journal. While the details differ between contexts, these two pathways are generally applicable across most countries, institutions and sectors. Given the variance between countries, educational systems, and sectors, it is unclear whether developing standard models is possible in the OER space, However, it has significantly increased the opportunities for international collaboration and resource development in parallel movements, and an absence of commonly understood pathways could be a barrier slowing us down.”

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Foundations for OER Strategy Development  DRAFT 1 – 2 July 13 05.JPG

Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 July 13 05

 

 

Nicole Allen
8:59 AM Aug 17
p.s. Stephen, it’s not just you, I resolve all comments into oblivion equally.🙂 Generally we leave threads open until other people comment or the drafting team has a chance to discuss a course of action (if any). We reply to explain our decision and if there are no additional comments, we resolve it to make space for other voices.
We’re now winding down the editing process on this doc, so if there are issues you feel are unaddressed please speak now.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1IYDeAmw3aMxuqpfEr_7BEwM5FJiqqX1S4dzPJZQqwTY/edit#

Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 02

 

Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 03a

 

Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 03b
AUGUST EDITS and COMMENTS
Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 05
Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 05aFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 05bFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 05bFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 05cFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 07Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 07aFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 07bFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 09Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 09cFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11aFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11b
Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11c
Cable Green

Works for me. I removed CC BY and replaced it with the generic (Creative Commons licenses).

10:58 PM Aug 22

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

10:58 PM Aug 22

Don Gorges

Re-opened
__Hi Cable _ I hope you will reopen all Stephen Downes comments and responses _ This Government Funding policy strategy took a focused approach and form with The White House OER Letter _ “To achieve these goals, Administration policy on access to federally funded educational materials should direct the agencies to adhere to these core principles:
“3. Conditions that enable reuse. To maximize the value of these informational resources created with public funds, it is essential that recipients of Federal funds agree as a term and condition of such funding that they grant to the public broad copyright permission to reuse and adapt these materials for any purpose so long as the creator and the agency receive appropriate attribution.” _ https://docs.google.com/document/d/1sV3stjrzi3jB_knfGyfAft77qEUKR4Rj-soktIf5Vu8/edit?pli=1 _ The public will form an opinion and speak up on funding policy when they find see compare use review OER to Copyright resources that best meet their needs.

2:41 AM Yesterday (edited 11:08 AM Yesterday)
Edit
Delete

Don Gorges

__Where can we find data on federally funded educational materials i.e. breakdown lists of copyright titles affected by this policy proposal?

7:47 AM Yesterday
Edit
Delete

Cable Green

Hi Don: Thanks for your comments. (1) Stephen’s main concern – on this thread – was listing CC BY as the recommended default for open licensing policies. That has been resolved by removing “CC BY” and replacing it with this more generic text: “We need strategies such as open license funding requirements (e.g., Creative Commons licenses) that will redirect some or all of that money to OER.”

(2) re: where you can find open licensing policies – the current place is the OER Policy Registry: https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/OER_Policy_Registry... if you know of an OER open policy not listed – please add it or let me know and I will do so. An example of content resulting from an OER open licensing policy is: https://www.skillscommons.org

(3) You are correct – the public will form an opinion and make acquisition choices re: OER vs. all-rights-reserved copyrighted resources. Price, effectiveness, legal rights to modify, etc… will all come into play. The public will also decide if they think they deserve to have free and legal access to the resources they paid for with tax dollars. If you’d like to discuss whether or not publicly funded resources should be openly licensed by default – I’m happy to do so – but let’s move it to an OER listserv. Gdocs isn’t the best format.

(4) Resolving this comment as Stephen’s concern has been addressed and text modified.

1:28 PM Yesterday

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

1:29 PM Yesterday

Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11dFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11eFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11fFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11g

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11iFoundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11jDon Gorges

4:13 PM Yesterday
__Perhaps it would be helpful here to point to where can we find data on federally funded educational materials i.e. breakdown past/current lists of copyright titles affected/excluded by this policy proposal? Naturally, the public should be made aware of the specific resources that currently meet federal funding criteria, but would be excluded by a “CC by default” funding policy.

Don Gorges
4:13 PM Aug 23
Selected text:

In many cases they are already spending money directly on course materials, or on programs that create course materials.

Show all
__Perhaps it would be helpful here to point to where can we find data on federally funded educational materials i.e. breakdown past/current lists of copyright titles affected/excluded by this policy proposal? Naturally, the public should be made aware of the specific resources that currently meet federal funding criteria, but would be excluded by a “CC by default” funding policy.
Reply
Resolve

Cable Green

Good point, Don. Two points (1) remember this is a global doc / discussion about OER – so the answer will be different for each country. (2) In most / all countries – there is still important work to be done re: cataloging what national governments are funding (in grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, etc.) that produce educational resources.

3:31 PM Yesterday

Don Gorges

__I agree, Cable, we need necessary information to judge the pros and cons of this CC by default policy proposal.

6:25 PM Yesterday

Cable Green

Thanks Don. To be clear – this doc no longer says “CC BY.” Given there is broad consensus that publicly funded educational resources should be openly licensed – in the global OER community – I think this paragraph is in good shape.

6:46 PM Yesterday

Nicole Allen

I agree. This discussion is important, but belongs somewhere other than this doc. Perhaps one of the OER email lists?

9:51 PM Yesterday

Don Gorges

Thanks, Cable and Nicole, I understand your positions on the importance of Government Funding. __ In Ontario, I’m interested in the creative sector economy and data on Ontario funded educational materials i.e. breakdown past/current lists of copyright titles affected/excluded by this policy proposal? Naturally, we should all become aware of the specific resources that are excluded by the restrictions of a CC/Open License funding policy.

Should I Resolve and close this or keep it open? _ Thanks

2:08 AM Yesterday
Edit
Delete

Cable Green

Thanks Don – I’m going to resolve this thread… and I’m happy to discuss this more 1-on-1 and/or on a list. You make an excellent point – knowing what is excluded is as important as knowing what is included under an open licensing policy. Of course, those details are worked out nation by nation.

12:22 PM Yesterday

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

12:22 PM Yesterday
Don Gorges
9:01 AM Today
Replace: “.” with “and it is essential that recipients of Government Funds agree, as a term and condition of such fundi…”
 ——
  • Government Funding: Governments are the largest potential source for funding that can bring OER to scale. In many cases they are already spending money directly on course materials, or on programs that create course materials. We need strategies such as open license funding requirements (e.g., Creative Commons licenses) that will redirect some or all of that money to OER. Publicly funded educational resources should be openly licensed by default and it is essential that recipients of Government Funds agree, as a term and condition of such funding, that they grant to the public, broad copyright permission to reuse and adapt these materials for any purpose, so long as the creator and the agency receive appropriate attribution..
Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 - Page 11L
 Foundations for OER Strategy Development  DRAFT 1 – 2 – Page 11L
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 Foundations for OER Strategy Development  DRAFT 1 – 2 – Page 11m
 Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 July 13 11m1Foundations for OER Strategy Development  DRAFT 1 – 2 July 13 11m1

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AUGUST EDITS and COMMENTS
Nicole Allen
8:59 AM Aug 17
p.s. Stephen, it’s not just you, I resolve all comments into oblivion equally.🙂 Generally we leave threads open until other people comment or the drafting team has a chance to discuss a course of action (if any). We reply to explain our decision and if there are no additional comments, we resolve it to make space for other voices. We’re now winding down the editing process on this doc, so if there are issues you feel are unaddressed please speak now.
 

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Draft 1.2_Foundations for OER Strategy Development_July 15.doc

 

Draft 1.2 Updated: July 13, 2015

Foundations for OER Strategy Development

Drafting committee members: Nicole Allen, Delia Browne, Mary Lou Forward, Cable Green and Alek Tarkowski

Purpose of Document

 

For more than a decade the movement for Open Educational Resources (OER) has evolved from a collection of small, localized efforts to a broad international network of institutions, organizations, practitioners, advocates and funders. While significant progress has been made on both expanding the availability of OER content and expanding its use, OER has not reached its full potential of entering mainstream education on a global scale.

 

The goals and broader vision for OER are outlined in foundational documents including the Cape Town Declaration and Paris Declaration. These documents are critical for communicating the case for OER to the outside world and providing a unifying voice for the movement. But while the goals for OER are clear and broadly agreed upon by the movement, the means and strategies for achieving them are not. To actualize the full vision of OER, a need has emerged for a document that looks inward and addresses strategic questions about how we, as the global OER movement, can reach our goals.

 

The purpose of this document is to provide a concise analysis of where the global OER movement currently stands: what the common threads are, where the greatest opportunities and challenges lie, and how we can more effectively work together as a community. The first draft was born from a meeting of 26 OER leaders in February 2015. We then shared this document and had multiple discussions with members of the international OER community at the 2015 Hewlett OER grantees meeting, OER15, and Open Ed Global 2015. Comments from all three meetings were integrated into this draft document.

 

Our hope is that this document will serve as a starting point for conversations about strategies for mainstreaming OER and extending its reach and impact globally. We also hope that this document, and the strategies within, will evolve as the conversation evolves to provide useful insight for both global coordination and local action.

 

State of the Movement

 

The OER movement consists of diverse individuals and organizations spanning educational institutions, IGOs, NGOs, and activities at all levels, from teaching infants to seniors; and ranges across a diversity of countries around the globe, with varied educational systems and social, economic and cultural contexts. The diversity of our perspectives, resources, and capacities is one of our movement’s great strengths, but it can also make strategy conversations challenging, as these discussions must start with a shared sense of what the strategy hopes to achieve. While the movement generally can agree upon the goals and vision outlined in the Cape Town and Paris Declarations, the specific missions and priorities of community members vary widely.

 

The common thread that seems to unite the movement is a belief in expanding the adoption of OER. While there are different visions for the specific practices, impacts, and audiences to be served and supported by expanding OER, we can all generally agree on what OER is, and that widespread use of OER is a positive and meaningful change in education. Given this common understanding, strategies can grow out of identifying the common challenges and opportunities around OER, and developing a shared sense of priority about what kind of actions will help advance the proliferation of OER development and use.

 

We Have Similar Perspectives On…

 

 

  • Definition of OER: The movement broadly agrees on the definition of OER as put forth by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation or UNESCO, noting that there may be some differences around which specific licenses qualify as OER (such as those restricting commercial use).  However, the general understanding that OER must be both free for students and teachers to access and to legally modify (according to the 5R activities: retain, reuse, revise, remix, redistribute) is widely accepted.
  • Overall Vision: The Cape Town and Paris Declarations each outline aspirational visions and goals for actualizing the potential of OER. While community members may prioritize some elements over others, in general the movement agrees that these documents form the basis for what we hope to accomplish.
  • Necessity of OER Adoption: While members of the community hold different goals for OER use, and different perspectives on the aspects of OER that are most important, we are united in asserting that OER adoption is necessary to actualize its potential. We understand adoption as a two-step process: people adopting OER instead of non-open resources, and people taking advantage of the rights and permissions granted by OER, to use and reuse content.
  • OER Ecosystem: We also agree that as preconditions of OER adoption, three elements are necessary:

 

    • Demand: Awareness of OER and the motivation to use it.
    • Supply: Infrastructure in terms of OER content and the tools to find, use, and adapt it.
    • Capacity: Community and systemic support that will sustain OER.
  • General Value Proposition: OER makes education accessible and expands the universe of what’s possible in education.
  • Licensing Standard: There is general recognition that Creative Commons licenses (excluding those with an ND restriction) are the standard way to license content as OER, where licensing is required.

[[ OER Ecosystem:

Nicole Allen
4:03 PM Jun 18
Note to drafters: Revisit framing of Demand and Capacity descriptions in response to Stephen’s comments. OER is the means to an end, not the end in itself.
Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez
1:28 PM Jun 20
I agree that awareness of OER (in terms of knowing that they exist, where to find them and how to use them) and the motivation to use them will guarantee the demand from learners and teachers. Regarding capacity, maybe “Community and systemic support that will sustain open learning” could be a better wording in alignment with Stephen’s idea of OER being the means to an end.
Show less
Nicole Allen
4:52 PM Jul 13
Discussed with Cable, and we realize these are classic economic terms which may not be as applicable outside the US as a framework for looking at strategy. Are there other terms or other ways to frame this that make sense more broadly?
]]

We Have Various Perspectives On…

 

Most Important Strategic Goals of OER

 

There are many strategic goals of OER, and while we generally agree that all of them are important, members of the movement place priority on different aspects. Some of the most typical strategic goals of OER are:

 

  • Reducing barriers to education, including access, cost, language and format.
  • Transforming teaching and learning and enabling effective pedagogy.
  • Enabling the free access to and reuse of expressions of human knowledge, in all of its forms.
  • Enhancing educational opportunities to foster development and more productive, free societies.
  • Empowering educators to have more agency in the classroom.
  • Connecting communities of educators around open content.
  • Increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of public funds spent on education.
  • Expanding the use of internet and digital technologies in education.

[[ Empowering educators to have more agency in the classroom.

Stephen Downes
7:27 PM Jul 13
This is still not the purpose of OERs.
]]

 

Extent of OER Adoption Necessary to Consider the Movement a “Success”

 

There are varied opinions about what extent of OER adoption is necessary for our model to achieve success:

 

  • Disrupting the educational materials and services market so that it flips to OER as the default model for resource production.
  • Shifting public funding models to pay for publishing services, rather than paying for individual copies of textbooks.
  • Mainstreaming OER among educators so it competes with the traditional publishing model in terms of reach and use.
  • Sufficient quantity of high quality OER necessary to provide choice.
  • Measurable increase in learning achievement that leads to employability.
  • Significant number of education and training systems built with curriculum based on OER.

 

Top Strategic Priorities for OER

 

Taking into account the strategic goals listed above, we can define several leading actions to achieve them. While the movement can agree that all of these actions are important, there is no consensus on which one is the top priority. Some of the top priorities are:

 

  • Build OER content to fill gaps in key disciplines or contexts and enable productive reuse, including openly licensed assessment items and openly licensed competency maps and lists of learning outcomes.
  • Develop and implement open licensing policies that require public and foundation funded educational resources are openly licensed by default.
  • Create and communicate effective research studies in conjunction with OER development and use.
  • Grow and foster communities that support, in a grassroots manner, the development and mainstreaming of OER.
  • Develop models or strategies for OER adoption, development and/or evaluation that can be replicated in other contexts.
  • Build key tools that enable more effective development, management, discovery and reuse.
  • Broaden our focus to include the practices of educators and learners that can be achieved with a shift to open resources, for example, open pedagogy, open educational practices, open assessment, open credentials, etc.
  • Better communicate the value of OER to educators, policy makers and other key constituencies.
  • Scale OER in a specific sector, i.e. K-12, higher education, workforce development, lifelong learning, etc.

 

Movement Strengths

 

The OER movement has achieved multiple victories and successes. Among the most important ones are:

 

  • Breadth of Content: Over years, different projects have tested and developed a wide range of open resources that are high quality, cost-effective, effective in supporting learning, and sustainable. Resources include content repositories, textbooks, and courses. Resources span all levels of education from early childhood to adult, and cover manifold topics and subject areas.
  • Strong Policy Models: Successful OER advocacy has led to the design and deployment of policies supporting OER production and use, at different levels: school, city, national and international. Policies have also been developed by private educational foundations and private companies. Together, they provide a broad template that can be adapted and reused.
  • Collective Impact: Coalitions have been proven to be successful in promoting OER, advocating for policies, and achieving change. They provide for a strong legitimization by a collective voice of varied actors with an interest in education: non-governmental organisations, public institutions and individual activists.
  • Growing Ties with the Open Movement: OER activism as part of a broader open movement is benefitting from growing ties with advocates of open science, open data, open access publishing, free and open source software, open culture, and/or open government. For example, students and young researchers think about OER and Open Access (OA) together; librarians with good understanding of OA are a growing force supporting OER; and OER policies are strengthened by including them in broader open government policies.
  • Individual Champions: Significant successes in OER are often attributed to passionate, persevering champions, particularly in the policy and adoption arenas. Such individuals are able to achieve significant change almost single-handedly. They’re especially important when their experience and knowledge can be multiplied, by building collaborations, mentorship models, and networks with other activists.
  • Global Reach and Significance: OER has been recognised by key international organizations active in education, and has support at institutions across the globe.
  • Supportive Research: Key projects and scholars have been conducting research on OER and its impacts, and the breadth and depth of this research continues to grow.

 

Movement Challenges

 

Challenges include both external (conditions in greater educational environment) and internal

(issues within the OER movement). Not all challenges are present in every national or local context, but many themes arise frequently in strategy conversations, including:

 

  • Linear Rate of Growth: Momentum is building, but adoptions are still primarily happening on a one-by-one basis, and we’re still piloting and proving one example at a time. While pilots often prove successful, the models rarely end up being replicated or brought to scale. For full impact to be realized, growth needs to be exponential rather than linear, both within national contexts and internationally.
  • Absence of Broad Standards: Other segments of the open movement have standardized models, such as the “green” and “gold” routes for Open Access or the 5 Star Open Data standard. The OER movement employs standardized open licenses, yet we still lack a single standard or unified message that is applicable around the globe. This is in part due to the diversity of the education sector, which spans education from infants to the elderly, and employs a variety of resources and tools. This is also due to a large variance between local and national autonomy of education, especially at primary and secondary levels, and variations in systems from country to country. Finally, use and reuse practices are crucial in education, as well as personalised approaches to learning – these don’t standardize easily. However, in order for OER to scale, some standards or standard pathways are needed.
  • Insufficient Awareness: Awareness of OER is still very low. This is true both in terms of understanding that OER exists as an alternative to currently used materials, and a deeper understanding of the benefits, quality, and potential innovations that can happen when it is adopted. While awareness is not a sufficient (or in some cases, even necessary) condition for adoption, it is a common barrier faced toward achieving the benefits of OER.
  • Difficulty of Discovery, Use and Remix: OER discovery, curation and re-use are often laborious and complicated. This is a consistent challenge across the commons. Repositories are varied and do not have shared search terms and metadata. Materials are presented in a wide variety of formats. Tools to assist with remix, curation and reuse are insufficient, not well known, and/or are not themselves open.
  • Inconsistent Breadth and Depth: OER supply is uneven across subject areas and disciplines. Some OER is very complete, while others are little more than links or shells. This can undermine the impacts of awareness raising and slow down momentum if people who want to adopt OER don’t have OER to adopt.
  • Lack of Evidence: A persistent area of frustration for OER supporters is the lack of compelling, locally-relevant evidence for the impact of OER. This includes research demonstrating efficacy and illustrative case studies. Just as important is a better understanding of contextual variables that affect OER adoption and impact, such as educator practices, and the ways resources and IT are employed in education.
  • Questions About Sustainability: Business models, public funding models for supporting OER continue to develop, with numerous case studies of each. However, there are still questions surrounding long-term sustainability and the ability for OER to “stick” in the marketplace without philanthropic support.
  • Minimal Evidence of Reuse: Potential for reuse is one of the key arguments OER advocates use to promote their model; using OER can make teachers and students into active creators and collaborators, while resources become dynamic and improve over time. Yet we don’t have enough compelling testimonials, case studies or evidence that this is taking place, nor have we connected this advantage to a broader problem that stakeholders care about. Cultural and legal barriers can also stand in the way.
  • All or Nothing Thinking. Many of the faculty and teachers who do evaluate OER look for a single resource to replace their existing textbook (which is also a single resource). If they can’t find a single resource that satisfies their needs they are likely to continue using their proprietary textbook. Faculty and teachers need help understanding that OER are designed to mix and match pieces from a range of sources – they are designed to be revised and remixed. If faculty cannot move beyond the “adopt a book” mentality of the previous 100 years the potential of OER will likely go unfulfilled.
  • Poor Branding: In recent years, the term “open” is used in education ever more widely, with a variety of meanings. It gives opportunity to bring OER into a broader educational debate – but with several definitions of “open”, educators and learners are understandably confused. We are at risk of others “openwashing” OER. At the same time, paradoxically, the term OER is little known, difficult and technical – not a perfect educational “buzzword”.
  • Perfect as an Enemy of the Good: It is critical to maintain a strong definition of OER to avoid “openwashing,” but this can also create a dynamic where efforts that take a step in the right direction, but do not meet our definition, are excluded and not given recognition.
  • Lack of OER heroes: Mainstreaming OER requires stories that make people pay attention – exciting and engaging enough to make them interested in a relatively challenging subject that combines pedagogy, technology and law. We have good stories, but not great ones. Some of the really big stories in modern, digital education, such as Khan Academy and MOOCs, are at best ambivalent about open.

 

Opportunities

 

Many opportunities exist for advancing OER, both in new ways and by expanding on opportunities that have already proven successful. We have organized the opportunities below based on the three components necessary for OER adoption: demand (awareness and motivation to use OER), supply (content and tools to use it), and capacity (community and systemic support for sustainability). These opportunities identify key places where the OER movement can intervene to help advance OER, and are intended to provide a useful starting point for developing strategies.

Demand

 

    • Increase Awareness: It is essential to raise awareness of OER as an option, both as an alternative to proprietary materials (and publishers’ new lease-not-own models) and also in new markets underserved by traditional publishers. Also, there is a significant awareness opportunity within populations already using openly licensed materials without fully realizing that they are  OER or that they can exercise 5R rights.
    • Build Evidence Base:  Improve the body of evidence showing the positive impacts of OER, focusing on contexts where OER presents an especially critical solution to a problem. This includes efficacy research that looks at key areas such as improved learning outcomes, business models, innovative reuse, improving equity, and cost savings.  It also includes compelling case studies and stories that illustrate the impacts.
    • Improve Communications: Build a stronger case for OER to strengthen its branding and value proposition. Be more active in communicating by developing resources, coordinating messages, and working with other segments of the open movement. Consider the key target audiences of OER, and tailor resources to reach those audiences. Assets such as compelling human stories, infographics, and plain language resources will be key.

 

  • Embed OER In the Teaching Profession: Take advantage of ready-made pathways for instructors to become aware of and learn to effectively use OER. In the short term, this could be linking OER with professional development activities that educational systems already conduct. In the long term, this would be integrating OER into teacher training and teacher prep programs.

 

    • Engage Key Constituencies: OER adoption is not just about engaging the teachers, schools and policymakers who make resource decisions. Other constituencies, particularly librarians and students, can play a key role in helping to catalyze and support these decision makers. Librarians are experts at finding, curating and sharing resources. This community wasn’t originally deeply engaged in OER, but has increasingly become involved. Students are also key as the beneficiaries of education, and also the largest constituency in terms of numbers. Students can also be mobilized to raise awareness and as a catalyst for action. Other key constituencies include copyright officers, Accessibility services, and instructional designers.
    • Empower the grassroots: Without grassroots support from educators, OER policies will never fulfill their potential. In particular, the promise of re-use cannot be met without the engagement of users with open resources.

 

  • Coordinate Demand With Supply: Focus on building demand in areas where supply exists.

 

 

Supply

 

    • Focus on Productization: OER is easier to adopt when it is presented as a “turnkey” solution that is ready to use immediately without extra work, particularly in developed markets. Meeting the expectation of convenience that teachers and faculty have come to expect from traditional materials can help OER adoption spread on a faster and wider scale. Once practitioners are using OER in a familiar form, more work can be done to support their exploration of innovative remixing and use.
    • Develop Strategic Tools: While building tools alone is not enough to solve problems, there are some central challenges that can be removed through strategic, interoperable tools to support the OER lifecycle: development, management, discoverability and reuse. The most immediate need to support adoption is tools for the effective discoverability of OER, but also tools that enable users to fulfill the promise of OER in terms of creation, licensing, reuse and remix for teachers and students.

 

  • Build Supply to Meet Demand: The movement has learned that the “build it and they will come” philosophy is not successful for OER. It is more effective to prioritize building OER in areas where there is high potential for large scale adoptions, both in terms of the number of students served and the potential for institutional commitment and resources to support OER development and use.
  • Accessibility: The flexibility offered by the 5Rs offers significant benefits over traditional materials in terms of accessibility for students with disabilities. This benefit can be leveraged when creating supply, to demonstrate the benefits in contexts where accessibility is important.

 

  • Open Up Existing Platforms and Resources: Evangelizing open can help turn existing services and resources into OER. This is a key, alternative tactic to creating new, open resources. This allows our movement to benefit from already existing resources, networks and communities, once they are made open.
  • Learners as Creators: Inherent in open pedagogies and open educational practices is the idea of students as creators. If harnessed effectively, engaging students in the development, improvement and assessment of content could help drive the supply side of the market.

 

Capacity

 

  • International Growth: Successful OER projects tend to have a relatively small scale and have not widely spread to other institutions, regions, countries. Using key projects as models for scaling is a major opportunity for our movement. At the international level, it is important to build foundations of the OER movement by examining local needs and priorities, and then using and adapting best practices, advice and tools from existing projects and experiences.
  • National Mainstreaming: Multiple projects prove sustainability and benefits of OER, but OER has still not entered the mainstream at a global scale. In countries with relatively developed OER activities, a key opportunity is is an opportunity to shift from a narrow OER community to the broad education community, by addressing broader values and needs of educators. It is crucial to develop, at national level, an integrated set of activities that combines policy work, content production and assembly, community building, etc. into a holistic model for OER growth.
  • Institutionalization: The long term sustainability of OER depends on institutions becoming not only the creators and users of OER, but also the complete support systems behind it. Efforts to embed OER in teacher training, professional development, student orientation, information literacy, tenure and promotion, and other relevant institutional processes will help build this capacity.
    • Open as an Aspect of Digital in Education: The Paris Declaration sees OER as an aspect and key element of digital education. OER can be successfully introduced if merged with IT in education initiatives – and vice-versa: digital education strategies are more sound, effective and sustainable if they include the OER model.

 

  • Government Funding: Governments are the largest potential source for funding that can bring OER to scale. In many cases they are already spending money directly on course materials, or on programs that create course materials. We need strategies such as open license funding requirements (ideally CC BY by default) that will redirect some or all of that money to OER.
  • Improve Movement-Wide Coordination: Members of the movement are doing effective, impactful work, but there is a lack of coordination between segments of the movement that may have similar or complementary aims. Increasing communication and coordination among groups within the movement can help accelerate progress through shared best practices, improve efficiency by avoiding duplication of efforts, and amplify impact by identifying areas of synergy and common messages. This could take the shape of a lateral network that connects various nodes, not a top-down or time-intensive requirement. The goal is not to stop people from doing good work, but rather to insure that the work being done is amplified and built upon for better service to the movement as a whole.
  • Connect With Other Open Movements: Movements for openness in research publishing, science, data, software, and other areas are pursuing similar goals and are facing similar challenges. While some areas of OER are beginning to forge ties, a more deliberate effort to coordinate messages and actions will help build a stronger and broader open movement that benefits us all.

 

 

Next Steps

 

This document is a synthesis of discussions held during the initial strategy meeting in Washington, DC and feedback received from the OER community through conferences, meetings and sharing this document. We invite the global OER community to share their feedback on any aspect of the document, and particularly welcome feedback on our assessment of the state of OER and the broad priorities of the open education movement. Our aim is to create a document and related activities that support the community to engage in conversations about effective strategies for the adoption of OER, and to promote better coordination between different segments of the community so that we can better support each other.

 

For the immediate future, we would like to focus the conversations within the OER community. We encourage you to share this document and hold conversations in your OER networks, conferences, seminars and meet-ups. Our goal is to end with a document that is a useful foundation for effective strategy development.

 

 

Don Gorges
07:54 29 Jul
Made a suggestion
Reply

Don Gorges
06:54 25 Jul
Made a suggestion
Reply

Cable Green
20:18 17 Jul
Selected text:
Build OER that educators want to adopt
suggested replacement for: “Focus on Productization” section. Thoughts?
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Resolve

Nicole Allen

Looks great to me. Let’s leave these comments up to the end of the week, then resolve.

08:30 23 Jul

Cable Green
20:17 17 Jul
Add: “Build OER that educators want to adopt: Some educators want a “turnkey” education resources solution…”
Reply

Nicole Allen

This looks great Cable, nice work!!

08:28 23 Jul

Don Gorges
 
08:29 21 Jul
Delete: “redirect some or all of that money to OER”
 
Add space
Reply

Don Gorges

Suggestion rejected

10:16 21 Jul

David Wiley
03:07 19 Jun
Selected text:

support their exploration of innovative remixing and use

If faculty have to find a single resource they can adopt “as is” (turnkey) in order to participate in OER, they will continue to be very slow in coming. We need to do better helping them overcome this “all or nothing” attitude.
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Ryan Merkley

True, but if adopting OER means every educator has to built it themselves from pieces, we’ll reduce the addressable market considerably. So there has to be more than one approach, I’d suggest.

21:48 19 Jun

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

I agree that we need to do better at helping them overcome the “all or nothing” attitude. I think that metadata and detailed descriptions in repositories can help; also, the comments from other teachers on how they used the resource and even their own redistribution of revised material. It also has to do with helping teachers empower learners to be responsible for their own learning: having a broader array of resources to learn from and cater their needs allows this.

15:43 20 Jun

Cable Green

Is this re-framing better? “Build OER that educators want to adopt” – see new proposed paragraph.

20:30 17 Jul

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

Yes, “OER that educators want to adopt” sets a broader purpose, and I agree that it is important to acknowledge both interests (ready-to-use and freedom to adapt). The OER movement is inclusive, and as in all communities of practice, there will be those participating in the periphery, using OER “as they are” and providing valuable feedback for updated versions, perhaps from original authors or others interested in editing; little by little, they can move to the center, engaging in revising and remixing. I would only suggest to remove/reword the phrase “without extra work”. When I read it, the image of “laziness” came to my mind…

08:46 21 Jul

Nicole Allen
16:23 13 Jul
Selected text:

Absence of Broad Standards: Other segments of the open movement have standardized models, such as the “green” and “gold” routes for Open Access or the 5 Star Open Data standard. The OER movement employs standardized open licenses, yet we still lack a single standard or unified message that is applicable around the globe. This is in part due to the diversity of the education sector, which spans education from infants to the elderly, and employs a variety of resources and tools. This is also due to a large variance between local and national autonomy of education, especially at primary and secondary levels, and variations in systems from country to country. Finally, use and reuse practices are crucial in education, as well as personalised approaches to learning – these don’t standardize easily. However, in order for OER to scale, some standards or standard pathways are needed.

Discussed w/Cable and we recommend just taking this out — everything important we say elsewhere, and discussing standards can be a sore point. Any objections? +mlforward@openedconsortium.org +delia.browne@gmail.com +atarkowski@centrumcyfrowe.pl
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Resolve

Stephen Downes

+stephen@downes.ca

19:16 13 Jul

Cable Green

+ 1 – agree // +nicole@sparc.arl.org – do you want to resolve and remove the section? Or wait for more comments? All of the comments point to removing it.

19:55 17 Jul (edited 13:24 18 Jul)

Alek Tarkowski

-1. if standards are bad, why is OA a (I hope we all agree) success? why are we happy there is a single set of commonly used free licenses? I’m happy to develop this argument further. I acknowledge that this is controversial, but please let’s not simply delete it.

16:57 20 Jul

Nicole Allen

Happy to work with you to develop further. I agree it’s an important point, it seems to be the word “standards” that is causing issues. The core substance (minus the word standards) is addressed elsewhere. Could we perhaps simplify to talk in terms of “communicating pathways to OER”?

19:21 20 Jul

Stephen Downes
15:10 18 Jun
Selected text:

needed

The value of everybody saying the same thing, meaning the same thing, doing the same thing, etc. has always been greatly exaggerated. We should learn from the web, which is based in the first instance on protocols, which are voluntary engagements. We need to be able to create mechanisms for interoperability that are flexible and variable, and can grow and adapt. Standards are the opposite of this.
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Resolve

Nicole Allen

Do other commenters have thoughts on this? Standards aren’t the only way to do things obvi (and won’t apply in every situation), but do you consider the lack of standards a challenge? Would it help improve communications?

15:44 18 Jun

Amy Hofer

It seems to me that there are a lot of different standards already in the ed sector – for example, common core for k-12 in the US, professional standards, etc. In what way do OER need unique and distinct standards from those already in place? I like the point above about metadata as one example.

18:17 7 Jul

Cable Green

See above – the recommendation is to simply remove this section on “standards.”

19:56 17 Jul

Alek Tarkowski

Standards can be voluntary – a lot of the protocls Stephen mentions are in fact standards. this might be a linguistic / framing issue… and we’re not really writing about standards but “standard solutions”; and there does not need to be one. just to give a practical example: I’ve been talking over the last months with people from Central Asia, interested in promoting OER in their countries. if we were talking about OA, I would tell them to set up a repository. if this was open data, I’d tell them to open all public data sets, be able to name the key ones, and recommend a repository as well. with OER, there’s no blueprint to recommend.

17:01 20 Jul

Don Gorges
14:52 20 Jul
Made a suggestion
Reply

Scott Robison
09:24 19 Jun
Selected text:

Meeting the expectation of convenience that teachers and faculty have come to expect from traditional materials

This implies the focus is on replacing one product for another product. OERs are not products. They are processes. I’m all for convenience in adopting and adapting but this isn’t about finding or creating a product that “looks” like publisher content.
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rderosa

I agree. I think we will end up devaluing our “product” if we “productize” it. OER is most valuable when it is seen as a pedagogical tool rather than a stable artifact, so we shouldn’t “undersell” what OER is in order to make the quick sale.

11:33 19 Jun

Nicole Allen

The idea here is not to say that “productized” OER is more valuable. It is that such OER is easier for faculty adopt. The logic is “adopt before adapt” – if we can get OER into their hands, we can teach them how to use it in innovative ways. These opportunities are NOT meant to be universal and mutually exclusive with other strategies. They are meant to highlight pathways that can work, and it’s up to you to decide whether this is something relevant to your context. +ryan@creativecommons.org may wish to weigh in here.

21:11 19 Jun

Ryan Merkley

Nicole, thanks for the ping. I think this point is vital if we want to ever go beyond niche adoption to mainstream use and relevance.

I often find the term “productize” confusing because it carries some negative feelings as if it was “dumbed down”. I don’t think that’s what we mean here. A product, in this instance, is a complete solution that is built to satisfy some/all of its user’s needs.

The reality is we are “competing” against traditional materials and approaches, because in order to adopt OER, people need to see unique value from it. Getting them beyond the inertia of what they already know to the benefits of what OER can provide will require us to make it easy to adopt. A useful corollary might be cameras — first you give them point and shoots, which have some of the benefits, and some of the features, and eventually they want more, meet peers who share their interests, and come looking for high-end cameras with multiple lenses so they can do exactly what they want and get the full benefits.

21:46 19 Jun

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

I agree: the value of OER is in the process and the new habits it will start generating among teachers and learners.

15:27 20 Jun

Amy Hofer

As above, there is some reasoning here that doesn’t take into account the contingent faculty model that is in place at US colleges and universities. Adjuncts may want to do all the Rs but they are not paid for course development and often don’t know what they’re teaching until the week of classes (so don’t have time to adapt materials even if they were willing to volunteer). It would be a shame to leave those people out of the OER movement.

18:40 7 Jul

Amy Hofer

In fact, the more I think about this discussion thread, the more I’m feeling a disconnect with my own work. For me OER isn’t about a process or a product, it’s about helping students. I’m sure at the end of the day we all feel that way. I’d like to see a way of reframing the issue that’s less about how the sausage gets made.

18:54 7 Jul

Fiona MacAlister

I agree. I’m pretty new to the OER movement but one thing that I have found frustrating in my travels over the past few months is the lack of focus on the consumers of OERs. All of the focus seems to be on the promotion of the movement which is not a bad thing but we do then lose sight of the ultimate purpose.

There is also a distinct lack of focus on the wildly varying levels of digital literacy on the part of the producers. For me this is a key area that is contributing to the slow uptake in the mainstream. You can’t expect teachers/academics to become enthusiastic about something for which they don’t have the basic skills or tools. It is a barrier I have come up against time and time again in my e-learning travels. I am not talking about the development of high level ID/e-Learning but being comfortable, on a very simple level, within the digital environment. In my experience, the majority of teachers/academics are not at all comfortable. This is where I think the OER movement is missing the boat. It needs to be a core component of our strategies. There is a diffusion of responsibility in this area with the assumption that most producers have basic digital skills or someone else is teaching them to use the tools. In my opinion we are putting the cart before the horse if we expect people to be enthusiastic about or produce material as OERS when they are uncomfortable in the environment to begin with.

06:09 10 Jul

Cable Green

Is this re-framing better? “Build OER that educators want to adopt” – see new proposed paragraph. I tried to include (and show respect for) both educators who want (a) ready-to-go without much revision OER and (b) a buffet of OER from which to revise / remix.

20:23 17 Jul

rderosa

I appreciate everyone’s willingness to work on this! I totally get the turnkey approach both in using OER and in “selling” OER to certain faculty. In general, I like to push against the idea that there is such a thing, though, since I think the double value of “openness” is only present when the materials are fully integrated into a custom pedagogy. I think by talking about OER as replacement textbooks, our rhetoric undervalues their potential at a long-range cost to our movement. Everyone who uses a traditional textbook modifies it in actual use; OER acknowledges the reality of how we teach, and we should highlight that from the outset. All that being said, you guys are my heroes and totally sold me on this whole movement, so I don’t want to derail your well-informed approaches about how this should go. Thank you for letting the squeaky wheels squeak! I think this doc is wonderful!

11:18 20 Jul

Stephen Downes
19:19 13 Jul
Selected text:

(ideally CC BY by default)

There’s still significant disagreement on this. c.f. Steven Harnad on the open access lists. To me this is a deal-breaker — if you can’t include the >50% of people who want to use a NC license, then this is a divisive document, and not a unifying one.
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Cable Green

Hi Stephen: I would argue there is significant consensus re: requiring that publicly funded educational resources be openly licensed – and to use CC BY (or similar) wherever possible: the 51 member organizations of the Open Policy Network operate under this principle: https://openpolicynetwork.org/about/#members

Guiding principles: https://openpolicynetwork.org/about/#principles

19:45 17 Jul

Stephen Downes

You guys are like the European Commission, a bunch of unelected bodies who appoint themselves and then declare a “consensus” where there obviously isn’t one. Most of the world prefers not to have their work turned into fodder for clickbait mills. You should be honest and say that AS REPRESENTATIVE OF PUBLISHERS and the commercial content industry, you have agreed that the world’s creative output should be free for you to monetize.

(I imagine thus comment will be ‘resolved’ out of existence by Nicole Allen the way most of my previous comments and suggestions have been).

22:18 17 Jul

Cable Green

Thanks Stephen for your lively comments. Suggesting members of the open policy network are “reps of the publishers” gave me a good laugh😉 … (1) I softened the text to (e.g., CC BY). (2) The main argument for CC BY on open licensing policies is to maximize the degrees of freedom / flexibility for the public. In other words, fewer license restrictions / conditions = max flexibility for anyone to do what they want to do with the OER. See the remix possibilities at: https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/Wiki/cc_license_compatibility … In other words, CC BY licensed OER can be remixed with more CC licensed content than can other CC licensed OER with more restrictions / conditions. (3) Happy to discuss / debate this with you in another forum anytime … the gdocs comments don’t work well for long written responses. Good weekend.

13:37 18 Jul

Cable Green
13:26 18 Jul
Delete: “by default”
Reply

Cable Green
13:26 18 Jul
Replace: “ideally” with “e.g.,”
Reply

Cable Green
13:23 18 Jul
Made a suggestion
Reply

Cable Green
13:20 18 Jul
Add: “Publicly funded educational resources should be openly licensed by default.”
Reply

Stephen Downes
19:27 13 Jul
Re-open
Selected text:

Empowering educators to have more agency in the classroom

This is still not the purpose of OERs.
Reply

Cable Green

Isn’t educators having the legal rights to do the 5 Rs – to use, modify and share educational resources as they see fit – without having to ask permission – one (among many I grant) goals of OER? Makes me think this bullet should be rewritten to make the point better.

19:52 17 Jul (edited 20:44 17 Jul)

Stephen Downes

If that’s what you believe, say that. Not the vague and misleading ‘agency’ clause. 

22:22 17 Jul

Cable Green

Thanks Stephen – I will rewrite the point. If you have better text – please suggest.

13:13 18 Jul

Cable Green

replaced with: “Ensuring educators have the legal rights to retain, reuse, revise, remix and redistribute educational resources as they determine – without having to ask permission.” // resolving this comment

13:17 18 Jul

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

13:17 18 Jul

Cable Green
13:17 18 Jul
Selected text:

Ensuring educators

new suggested text (per Stephens comment to be more clear) – replacing: “Empowering educators to have more agency in the classroom.”
Reply
Resolve

Cable Green
13:14 18 Jul
Add: “Ensuring educators have the legal rights to retain, reuse, revise, remix and redistribute educationa…”
Reply

Cable Green
20:40 17 Jul
Selected text:

Develop Open Learning Analytics Platforms:

Added this new section. Thoughts? +nbier@cmu.edu +cthille05@yahoo.com
Reply
Resolve

Cable Green
20:38 17 Jul
Add: “Develop Open Learning Analytics Platforms: As OER goes mainstream, publishers will cede educational …”
Reply

David Wiley
03:04 19 Jun
Selected text:

ready to use immediately without extra work

While I clearly understand the sentiment expressed here, this idea is dangerous because it encourages faculty to ignore revise, remix, and other 5R activities. If we really wanted to advocate for turnkey solutions, the ND licenses would be acceptable.
Reply
Resolve

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

I agree that this idea is dangerous for the OER movement. The value of OER is the opportunity for collaboration, engagement, customization and reach that it allows. The “ready to use” attribute is true in some way, but it should not be the end goal. Stephen reminds us that OERs are means to an end (a high end). There can be OER that teachers may use “as it is”, but that does not mean it is offered as “all inclusive”. The room for revising, remixing and redistributing is there to enrich the network.

15:26 20 Jun

Nicole Allen

Someone added this response in the text (not sure who): Why? Leave it to faculty choice. Those that remix do not need encouragement and those that want the full package are ok. There is nothing intrinsically better about remixing.

15:45 13 Jul

Cable Green

Is this re-framing better? “Build OER that educators want to adopt” – see new proposed paragraph.

20:21 17 Jul

Nicole Allen
14:39 13 Jul
Re-open
Selected text:

Focus on Productization

Drafters: The overarching point here is to make OER that is easy for “the mainstream” to use. Let’s find a softer way to say this.
Reply

Nicole Allen

(Also note to self: mention mapping OER to competencies)

14:39 13 Jul

Cable Green

Cable will (a) edit this bullet and (b) write a bullet re: the need for open analytics systems to host / deliver OER.

17:11 13 Jul

Cable Green

added new section “Build OER that educators want to adopt” as suggested replacement for “Focus on Productization”

20:20 17 Jul

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

20:20 17 Jul

Cable Green
20:17 17 Jul
Format bullet: strike-through
Format: strike-through
Reply

Cable Green

Suggestion accepted

20:18 17 Jul

David Wiley
02:56 19 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

Absence of Standards

The idea of standards here terrifies me a little. What kind of standard would we have? A “quality” standard? It would almost certainly be based on the OER development process, sidelining individual contributors without the resources to mimic traditional publisher processes. It would also overlook the fact that EFFICACY is the primary thing we need to be targeting. I would be very supportive of “models” but maybe not standards.
Reply

Anonymous

Thanks David, great point. I think what we mean here is more along the lines of models than standard — something like we have the “green” and “gold” routes for OA (though we don’t like those terms) which make it very easy to communicate the pathways to making articles open. The OER space is more nebulous, which makes it harder to identify strategies and pathways. I think we can say this in a way that doesn’t use the word “standard” and maybe also shorten this point.

10:49 19 Jun

Nicole Allen

That was me.🙂 Yes, can see how standards might not be the right term here, we can reword.

10:51 19 Jun

Irwin DeVries

“established practices”?

01:12 20 Jun

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

I would suggest to have standards for the use of metadata to ease the search for OERs. I believe that if users and potential users can find OERs easily in a common search engine, adoption of OERs becomes more expedite. As Jeff mentions below, “[to] drive adoption…get good resources (that happen to be OER) in front of faculty”.

13:39 20 Jun

Phil Barker

This is a very odd section. It presents good arguments for why standards aren’t applicable and then says they are needed. What problem are you trying to solve with standards?

04:01 23 Jun

Cable Green

resolving this thread of comments – as the same topic is dealt with below – see Nicole’s (and my) proposal to remove this section on “standards”

19:54 17 Jul

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

19:55 17 Jul

Priscila Gonsales
12:15 15 Jul
Re-open
Selected text:

where licensing is required.

I completely agree with this, but I have doubts about this when some institutions are resistant to OER in a first moment. I’ve noticed that use ND can be a first step to enter in the world of openness.
Reply

Cable Green

HI Priscila – I agree that ND can be a good first step. The point here is ND licensed educational resources are not OER – they don’t meet the definition requirement of the public having the legal rights to modify the work.

19:32 17 Jul

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

19:51 17 Jul

lshochberg
11:17 24 Jun
Selected text:

Extent of Market Penetration

None of these measure any of the 5Rs – these are essentially about “free”. If the 5Rs are important, shouldn’t some measure of that actually happening be included in “success”? Perhaps something specifically about use of OER in enhancement tools provided by vendors, as that has been assumed to be one of the values of open content and unlimited reuse (and may turn out to be a more substantial means of the 5Rs than by end users.)
Reply
Resolve

Cable Green

Good point, Scott. +david.wiley@gmail.com … David – do you want to draft a few bullets?

19:50 17 Jul

David Wiley
02:42 19 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

Extent of Market Penetration

Should rename this heading. The bullets below do not address varying extents of market penetration.
Reply

Nicole Allen

Agree. We went through multiple iterations of it, and even considered taking out this whole section. Does anyone have ideas for the title here? We tried “Definition of Success” (too broad), and “Target Level of Adoption” (unclear).

09:11 19 Jun

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

Could it be something like “Achievements/Milestones to consider successful adoption of OER”?

13:37 20 Jun

Devon Ritter

Or perhaps just, “Signals of OER ‘Success'”

12:14 22 Jun

Amy Hofer

Long Term Goals

14:00 7 Jul

Nicole Allen

Ok guys, thanks for the input! We settled on “Extent of OER Adoption Necessary to Consider the Movement a “Success”” — better?

16:25 13 Jul

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

Yes, it’s better.

07:40 15 Jul

Cable Green

resolving – feel free to reopen if needed

19:48 17 Jul

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

19:48 17 Jul

Don Gorges
00:53 17 Jul
Add paragraph
Reply

Don Gorges

Suggestion rejected

02:40 17 Jul

Don Gorges
18:27 14 Jul
Format: normal text
Reply

Don Gorges

Suggestion rejected

18:27 14 Jul

Don Gorges
18:13 14 Jul
Made a suggestion
Reply

Nicole Allen
15:40 13 Jul
Selected text:

.

I will come back and edit this.
Reply
Resolve

David Wiley
03:10 19 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

What cannot be copied

Local needs and priorities are different as well, and solutions from one locale cannot be cut and pasted into another locale. Many times not even within the same country.
Reply

Ryan Merkley

+1 +david.wiley@gmail.com. Separate point: At the other end, what do we think can be copied? Methods for evaluating effectiveness? Open business models? Repositories? Data collection? I think there’s value in identifying the things we think could be re-used internationally.

21:51 19 Jun

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

I guess the issue here is the word “copy”. We can try to imitate models and follow the lead, but implementation is unique based on local needs. Adapting best practices is better.

15:30 20 Jun (edited 15:42 20 Jun)

Nicole Allen

Thanks for the comments guys! All great points. We’re removing this text (for other reasons) so resolving this comment. Made a few tweaks to reflect that it’s not about carbon copies, but about adapting to the local context.

17:23 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

17:23 13 Jul

Scott Robison
18:10 18 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

open pedagogies

Open pedagogy isn’t really defined anywhere, only mentioned (somewhat oddly) once above. I would consider thoroughly explaining it elsewhere or taking it out and just going with open educational practices.
Reply

Nicole Allen

Thanks for the suggestion. Do others here have input on this?

00:10 19 Jun

rderosa

I agree with Scott. I think “open pedagogy” adds a whole layer that is integrally related to OER, but also distinct from it (for example, the connection between enrolled course learners and wider publics is emphasized; learners are seen as engaged in the revision and production of knowledge, not just its transmission; course work is relevantly connected to public need and individual learning goals). I would imagine one foundational goal of our work now would be give educators a more comprehensive idea of how to embed OER into a broader open pedagogy. So either we should add something more clear about that higher up, or just stick with practice here, and aim for the pedagogical aspect to OER that engages teachers and students with the revising/remixing and creation of their own course texts.

11:41 19 Jun

Nicole Allen

Transplanting comment by Rory: Open pedagogy is tangential to OER. Theere areother pedagogies that can be incorporated as OER. We in the OER movement should be agnostic on the pedagogy. We need a wide umbrella and not be captivve to one peagogy.

21:15 19 Jun

Nicole Allen

Another comment by Rory: Open pedagogy is a bag of hammers with different meanings to different people. We should focus on OER exclusively. Asessement and Credetnialing are part of OER and should be included.

21:16 19 Jun

Brian Mulligan

I agree that credentialling may be a key issue in getting OER used by learners. However, it may bypass many faculty by going straight to the learners and won’t necessarily help adoption by faculty.

06:56 8 Jul

Nicole Allen

Thanks for the feedback everyone. We discussed this, and since the focus of the document is very narrowly on OER, we’re going to keep it simple and not dive into the topics of open pedagogy, OEP, etc. We did however add open pedagogy and OEP up top under strategic goals, since OER is part of the infrastructure that can support these ends.

17:18 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

17:18 13 Jul

Nicole Allen
17:12 13 Jul
Selected text:

Build Supply to Meet Demand

Drafters: Let’s revisit this in the context of whether to use supply/demand as a framework. Maybe demand is the wrong word here.
Reply
Resolve

David Wiley
02:44 19 Jun
Add: “, including openly licensed assessment items and openly licensed competency maps and lists of learni…”
Reply

Cable Green

Suggestion accepted

17:01 13 Jul

Stephen Downes
14:28 18 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

usage

A value proposition should underline the benefit received, but not necessarily the mechanism through which the benefit is realized. It stresses what we want to get from the thing. Hence here we should stress this: “OER makes education accessible and expands the universe of what’s possible in education.” Whether it’s the 5Rs or some other aspect or attribute of OERs can still be open to clarification or definition.
Reply

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

What I see in the value proposition is that it is focused on the educator, and it also needs to focus on the learner. Stephen’s suggestion of stressing the “accessibility and the expansion of the possibilities in education” includes both. I also think that the 5Rs and similar attributes are critical to define OERs; therefore, this needs to be explicit in the Definition of OER but not in its value proposition.

13:31 20 Jun

Amy Hofer

If a licensing standard is kept, does that open the door to other minimum thresholds, for example an accessibility/universal design standard?

13:56 7 Jul

Cable Green

Nicole and Cable discussed – and decided to keep it simple and shorten the sentence as Stephen suggests.

16:59 13 Jul

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

16:59 13 Jul

lshochberg
11:09 24 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

General Value Proposition: OER makes education accessible and expands the universe of what’s possible in education by allowing the 5Rs (reuse, revise, remix, redistribute, retain), and amplifying educators’ agency by increasing choices around content usage.

Do we have data showing that the 5Rs are something that a substantial percentage of users are actually doing? Or are they simply using OER as a low-cost alternative to commercial texts? I agree that the 5Rs add value, but have they been significant enough in actual OER use to be the core of the “general value proposition”? And does it vary by type of user? Who has info on how OER is actually used — David perhaps for the higher ed space?
Reply

andyb.lane

I have long argued that OER does not necessarily make education accessible to all or even to many. There remain issues of availability, accessibility, affordability and acceptability for learners and/or teachers when attempting to use OER within formal, non-formal and informal setting. However I agree it expands the universe of what’s possible.

10:51 7 Jul

Cable Green

We decided to keep it simple and reduce the sentence to what Stephen suggested below.

16:59 13 Jul

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

16:59 13 Jul

Nicole Allen
16:03 18 Jun
Selected text:

OER Ecosystem

Note to drafters: Revisit framing of Demand and Capacity descriptions in response to Stephen’s comments. OER is the means to an end, not the end in itself.
Reply
Resolve

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

I agree that awareness of OER (in terms of knowing that they exist, where to find them and how to use them) and the motivation to use them will guarantee the demand from learners and teachers. Regarding capacity, maybe “Community and systemic support that will sustain open learning” could be a better wording in alignment with Stephen’s idea of OER being the means to an end.

13:28 20 Jun

Nicole Allen

Discussed with Cable, and we realize these are classic economic terms which may not be as applicable outside the US as a framework for looking at strategy. Are there other terms or other ways to frame this that make sense more broadly?

16:52 13 Jul

Nicole Allen
15:54 18 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

necessary change in education

Need to refine. Stephen suggested “change in society to support learning”
Reply

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

I believe that the OER movement is introducing a new vision. It is indeed guiding society reformulate its perspective about helping to learn. Informal, formal and non-formal education may be starting to combine in the OER effort to support learning. I see Stephen’s suggestion as a way to help OER advocates and adopters to maintain a broad scope, keeping in mind that every OER shared represents a mind shift in society because of the way it is starting to generate a wide network to support learning openly and collectively.

13:22 20 Jun

Amy Hofer

Perhaps the sentence would be clearer with a brief statement about what’s positive – for example, lowering student costs and rethinking pedagogy.

12:58 7 Jul

Nicole Allen

Thanks for the suggestions! We changed “necessary” to “meaningful” and we’re going to leave it to the rest of this section to outline the reasons why.

16:46 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

16:46 13 Jul

Stephen Downes
14:34 18 Jun
Add: “for students and teachers”
Reply

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

How about learners and teachers? I understand “student” with a more “institutional” connotation. If we say “learner” we are including all those interested in learning whether participating in an institution or not. I would suggest using “learner” throughout the document. Both the Paris and the Cape Town Declaration also use “learner” instead of “student”.

13:24 20 Jun

Nicole Allen

Thanks for the suggestions! I think we’re going to keep this simple and just say “free to access”

16:43 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

16:43 13 Jul

Amy Hofer
13:51 7 Jul
Re-open
Selected text:

free

I think that people may get distracted by quibbles over the nuances of “free.” What about no-cost instead? (I don’t think that “low-cost” is appropriate at an international scale.)
Reply

Nicole Allen

Thanks for the suggestion Amy! Since this document is community-focused I think it’s safe to use free here.

16:43 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

16:43 13 Jul

Brian Mulligan
06:19 8 Jul
Add: “Significant numbers of people gaining useful learning experiences (measured by employability) primar…”
Reply

Cable Green

re-wrote as: “Significant number of education and training systems built with curriculum based on OER.” Thanks!

16:37 13 Jul

Cable Green

Suggestion rejected

16:37 13 Jul

Nicole Allen
15:35 13 Jul
Re-open
Selected text:

Other

Drafters: we should think about a way to re-word this. I think people agree with the sentiment, but it could be articulated more effectively.
Reply

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

16:23 13 Jul

Nicole Allen
15:34 13 Jul
Re-open
Selected text:

(ideally CC BY by default)

Adding this here in response to Cable and Stephen’s discussion above.
Reply

Cable Green

Marked as resolved

16:14 13 Jul

Stephen Downes
15:04 18 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

CC BY license preferred

Why would you undermine the nuance above with this blunt declaration that some types of OER are more equal than others?
Reply

Stephen Downes

p.s. this phrase by itself would cause me to withdraw any support for this document. And – again – there are tons of people working in OER who employ NC licenses, and prefer them. It’s not always about creating free stuff for commercial publishers to reprint.

15:05 18 Jun

Nicole Allen

Note this point isn’t about what license is best for OER, it’s about which should be the default for publicly funded resources, which is a different discussion, and one with little controversy. Though I can see how this might draw misunderstandings, so perhaps we should remove the parenthetical. I believe we make the point about policy elsewhere. +cable.green@gmail.com

15:30 18 Jun

Cable Green

Agree with Nicole – we’re talking about open licensing policies here – not OER licensing in general. Given the Open Policy Network is the leading voice on open policy best practices – maybe we could use their [revised to meet this context] language from: https://openpolicynetwork.org/about:

(1) remove the parenthetical

(2) add a new sentence:

Open licensing policies should require, as a default, licenses compliant with the Open Definition, with a preference for open licenses that at most require attribution to the author (such as CC BY) for publicly funded content and no rights reserved (such as CC0) for publicly funded data. We recognize there may be limited exceptions to the default.

15:45 18 Jun

Nicole Allen

I think a better place to address this is under the Government Funding point in opportunities. We can add a brief sentence at the end defining what we mean by open licensing.

16:07 18 Jun

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

16:14 13 Jul

Nicole Allen
14:04 26 Mar
Re-open
Selected text:

Draft 1.0

Please add comments via the google doc, or you can download and send comments back via email to nicole@sparc.arl.org for the drafting committee.
Reply

Pete Forsyth

Could you add a short section at the top describing the origin of this — whether similar strategic docs have been produced in the past (e.g., the Seely Brown doc) and what prompted this one, as well as what the editing schedule is (i.e., most significantly, deadlines for comments/revisions)?

19:26 27 Mar

Nicole Allen

Thanks Pete! The drafting group will be sure to add in a note about the overall timeline. For the immediate future, we’re holding our next discussion in Cardiff on April 14-15th, so we’ll probably look to incorporate these comments into Draft 1.1 then. Regarding the rest of the points, I think the Purpose of Document section covers most of it, with the exception of the one note I added. Do you think we need to be more explicit?

18:09 29 Mar

Alek Tarkowski

what’s the “Seely Brown doc”? Is it an important point of reference? I know the researcher, but don’t know the doc🙂

14:40 4 May

Matt McGregor

Marked as resolved

20:08 21 Jun

Matt McGregor

Re-opened

20:08 21 Jun

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

16:11 13 Jul

Irwin DeVries
02:43 19 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

“turnkey” solution

can we find a better term (sounds like a commercial marketing pitch) – maybe “complete package (e.g. open textbook with all ancillary resources included)”?
Reply

Nicole Allen

We’ve gone back and forth about this. It’s a US centric term, but this point is largely directed at the US, so it may be appropriate to leave in.

17:20 19 Jun

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:57 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
05:19 24 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

Productization

horrible word! productization?
Reply

Nicole Allen

Yep, we’ll change it to something.🙂

15:43 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:43 13 Jul

Amy Hofer
18:33 7 Jul
Re-open
Selected text:

Other key constituencies

Accessibility services
Reply

Nicole Allen

We mention Accessibility in a separate point, so adding this here to draw the connection. Thanks!

15:43 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:43 13 Jul

William Cross
10:39 7 Jul
Re-open
Selected text:

Librarians are experts at finding, curating and sharing resources

I think is an important point that could be underlined further. Marshaling resources that provide access to information is a core value for librarians, so they are natural partners that can support (via grants, etc.) but also promote discoverability, build tools for creation and remix, and leverage deep, trusted relationships with faculty and students.

Libraries are also significantly engaged with the larger open movement, leading the way on OA and now doing lots of work with open data.

As a profession, librarians have deep expertise in the legal and technical issues that many instructors lack, and the recent investment in scholarly communication issues with full-time positions, centers, etc. makes libraries likely to get more involved going forward.

Reply

Nicole Allen

🙂 I couldn’t agree more!!!! For the purposes of this document, we are (trying) to keep it lightweight and succinct. I think one of the useful things that could come out of the expanded “toolkit” you talk about below would be something mapping how librarians can contribute to advancing these strategies.

15:42 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:42 13 Jul

Anonymous
19:29 31 Mar
Re-open
Selected text:

Awareness of OER is an essential precondition to expanding adoption,

Awareness of OER is NOT an essential precondition (at least not among higher ed faculty). There are more faculty using OER than are aware of OER, and adoption decisions even among those aware of the concept of OER often ignore the OER aspect of the resource. Faculty select the best resources – OER or not. If you want to drive adoption it is NOT required to build better awareness of the broad concepts of OER, but rather get good resources (that happen to be OER) in front of faculty. Once they have and use them, then you can work on their understanding of just what they now have. -Jeff Seaman, BSRG
Reply

Nicole Allen

Thanks Jeff, this is valuable insight for U.S. discussions about implementation. Perhaps we could change the word “essential” to something a little softer. Do others in other countries/contexts feel we need to modify or qualify this point?

08:51 1 Apr

Matt McGregor

Awareness is a definite barrier here (in NZ), where we are attempting to create a commons of OER produced by and for K-12 teachers. There’s no way to do this without making teachers aware of what OERs are, what problems they solve, etc.

Also, if you want faculty to adapt, revise and re-distribute resources – to achieve some of the broader strategic goals listed above – then I think they’re going to need to be aware of the legalities of doing so.

tl;dr: in relation to the strategic goals listed above, ‘essential’ seems appropriate.

21:20 18 Jun

Archana Thakran

Awareness certainly is a great barrier in here in India as well. Majority of the faculty have never heard about the term ‘OER’. So ‘essential’ is very apt here.

01:49 19 Jun

Nicole Allen

Thanks all. Added this sentence to the end “While awareness is not a sufficient (or in some cases, even necessary) condition for adoption, it is a common barrier faced toward achieving the benefits of OER.”

15:37 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:37 13 Jul

Stephen Downes
15:03 18 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

reuse

Maybe ‘identify the gaps’ ought to be first. The world is filled with tons of open content, yet advocates sometimes act as though it doesn’t exist
Reply

Nicole Allen

This is a critical point, but I think it is implicit enough for the purposes of this section.

15:32 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:32 13 Jul

Nicole Allen
17:12 19 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

excluding those with an ND restriction

Anonymous commenter asked why NC is not excluded. Responses?
Reply

Brian Mulligan

Because people earning money from open knowledge is a good thing and does not restrict that knowledge being used by others.

06:12 20 Jun

Nicole Allen

Agreed.🙂 There is general consensus that while NC is not ideal for enabling OER reuse, it falls within the scope of the Hewlett and UNESCO definitions, and should not be excluded for the purposes of developing strategies.

15:30 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:30 13 Jul

lshochberg
11:13 24 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

There are many strategic goals of OER,

Following on my comment about the value proposition, many of these goals do not seem to require the 5Rs (though they may add value in some cases),
Reply

Nicole Allen

Thanks, great point. I think it’s ok that connections 5Rs are not drawn directly here, but definitely something we need to think about in terms of communicating the goals and benefits of OER.

15:29 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:29 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
05:05 24 Jun
Add: “the use of”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:23 13 Jul

Stephen Downes
15:01 18 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

teaching

Is this really a goal of OERs? When I think ‘professional’ I think of doctors, lawyers, architects – really expensive people to hire, who provide specialized services that most people in the world can’t afford.
Reply

Nicole Allen

This actually came up several times in our discussions around this document. The idea is that teachers are becoming de-professionalized as curriculum increasingly comes “in a box”, and OER provides a platform for teachers to gain more agency in the classroom. (I’m sure someone else can articulate this more eloquently)

15:06 18 Jun

J Marks

I have always framed this as empowering educators and giving them responsibility to adjust the materials to fit the needs of their local community and culture, as well as the special needs of individuals.

19:34 18 Jun

Teresa Mackinnon

Although the discourse is often framed in terms of “professionalism” I agree with Steven that the language is problematic. This is a about empowering teachers and recognising the craft of teaching which exists as part of a community of practice within a discipline or area of activity.

12:43 19 Jun

Mónica Sulecio de Álvarez

I totally understand the point of OER creating a “platform for teachers to gain more agency in the classroom”, but I don’t think “re-professionalizing teaching” is the best way to say it. Teachers are no longer the content providers; they are mentors/coaches/helpers of the learners. When teachers have OERs to rely on, they have time to do what only humans can: interact with the learner’s whole being to understand how he/she is progressing and provide the help needed. How about “empowering teachers to guide learning closely” .

13:33 20 Jun

Nicole Allen

Thanks all, fantastic feedback. Changing this to “empowering educators to have more agency in the classroom”

15:22 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:22 13 Jul

Stephen Downes
14:32 18 Jun
Add: “more or less”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Do other commenters agree with this change?

15:54 18 Jun

Nicole Allen

adding “generally”

15:15 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Suggestion rejected

15:15 13 Jul

Amy Hofer
12:56 7 Jul
Replace: “seems to unite” with “unites”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Keeping this a little softer, but thanks for all of your fantastic edits!

15:15 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Suggestion rejected

15:15 13 Jul

Pete Collins
05:19 22 Jun
Format: indent first line
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion rejected

15:14 13 Jul

Anonymous
21:38 23 Jun
Made a suggestion
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion rejected

15:13 13 Jul

Anonymous
21:40 23 Jun
Made a suggestion
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion rejected

15:13 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
05:00 24 Jun
Add: “ranges across”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:13 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
04:59 24 Jun
Add: “s”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Thank you Kate, your copy editing has been extraordinarily helpful!!

15:13 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:13 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
04:58 24 Jun
Add: “s”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:13 13 Jul

Amy Hofer
13:52 7 Jul
Replace: “are hoping” with “hope”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:09 13 Jul

Amy Hofer
13:52 7 Jul
Replace: “place more emphasis or priority on” with “prioritize”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:09 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
05:23 24 Jun
Add: “that”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion rejected

15:06 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
05:23 24 Jun
Add: “that”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion rejected

15:06 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
05:22 24 Jun
Replace: “,” with “:”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:06 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
05:20 24 Jun
Replace: “A” with “a”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:05 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
05:20 24 Jun
Replace: “A” with “a”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:05 13 Jul

Phil Barker
04:06 23 Jun
Add space
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:05 13 Jul

Phil Barker
04:06 23 Jun
Add space
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:05 13 Jul

Amy Hofer
18:35 7 Jul
Re-open
Selected text:

Students can also be mobilized to drive demand and as a catalyst for action

I try to make this point in a more nuanced way when I’m talking with people. It may not be the best approach for students to directly try to change faculty. But they can be powerful advocates with administrators, who in turn can provide support to faculty who convert their courses.
Reply

Nicole Allen

Thanks Amy, softened it a bit.

15:04 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:04 13 Jul

Kate Makowiecka
05:15 24 Jun
Replace: “is” with “they are”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

15:03 13 Jul

Stephen Downes
15:16 18 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

open

I’m an open hero.😉

More seriously, the story of why this is the case is complex, and not limited to OERs. MOOCs were first developed specifically to use OERs, and were very popular, but did not become a but ‘story’ until adopted (and coopted) by people from Stanford and MIT. When we look to elites for inspiration, it’s pretty hard to find instances of populist and democratic ideas.

Reply

Nicole Allen

Perfect parallel. Though this is a critique of society as a whole. The way we get around this from a communications standpoint, I think, is that we need to focus less on the ideals, and more on the impacts. Open doesn’t need to be the thing that gets attention, just the awesome things that happen only because of open. But that doesn’t change the problem, only gets around it.

15:40 18 Jun

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:03 13 Jul

Stephen Downes
15:13 18 Jun
Re-open
Selected text:

recognition

Right. Maybe highlight this. Because there’s no value of ‘our’ that satisfies the criterion of ‘our definition’.
Reply

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:03 13 Jul

Amy Hofer
18:19 7 Jul
Re-open
Selected text:

Tools

Is there a way to include the help of librarians here?
Reply

Nicole Allen

Absolutely!! We mention below that librarians are key to engage, and will make a note to draw a connection to this point.

15:02 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Marked as resolved

15:02 13 Jul

sunyeen
21:14 23 Jun
Delete: “lack”
Reply

Nicole Allen

Thanks Sunny!

14:56 13 Jul

Nicole Allen

Suggestion accepted

14:56 13 Jul