BCcampus Exploring Faculty Use of OER at BC Institutions: OER Survey 2014-15

January 18, 2016
BCcampus Research Report
Prepared by:
Rajiv S. Jhangiani, Ph.D., Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Rebecca Pitt, Ph.D., OER Hub
Christina Hendricks, Ph.D., University of British Columbia
Jessie Key, Ph.D., Vancouver Island University
Clint Lalonde, M.A., BCcampus

New Study: Exploring Faculty Use of OER at BC Institutions

How do faculty in British Columbia use Open Educational Resources (OER)? What are some of the ways in which they are using OER, and what are some of the barriers they face when using OER? A new research paper published today by BCcampus looks at some of these questions.

Led by the the 2015 BC Open Textbook Faculty Fellows (Rajiv S. Jhangiani, Ph.D., KPU, Christina Hendricks, Ph.D., UBC and Jessie Key, Ph.D., VIU) and in collaboration with the OER Hub (Rebecca Pitt, Ph.D.), this research project examines the use of OER by post-secondary faculty in British Columbia, including their motivations and perceptions, as well as what factors help to enable or act as challenges for OER use and adaptation.

Although the findings provide a snapshot of the BC post-secondary system as a whole, the research also explore similarities and differences in OER use among faculty across three types of institution in British Columbia: research-intensive universities, teaching-intensive universities, and colleges/institutes.

purposes-for-using-oer-bccampus-faculty-survey

Top reasons why BC post-secondary faculty use OER, grouped by type of institution

Key Findings

Among the reports 11 key findings are;

  • While faculty at all three institutional types (research-intensive universities, teaching-intensive universities, and colleges/institutes) reported similar adoption patterns of OER, faculty at research-intensive universities were more likely to adapt and create OER than faculty at teaching-intensive universities or colleges/institutes.
  • A majority of faculty perceive OER to be comparable or superior in quality to traditional, proprietary materials; however, faculty who have adopted OER rate the quality of OER significantly higher than those who have not adopted OER.
  • The barriers of locating high-quality, relevant and up-to-date OER were reported to be significantly lower by faculty at research-intensive universities than by faculty at both teaching-intensive universities or colleges/institutes.
  • Quantitatively, lack of institutional support for use of OER was reported as a more significant barrier by faculty at colleges/institutes than faculty at either teaching-intensive universities or research-intensive universities. However, a qualitative analysis of open-ended responses shows that faculty at all types of institutions face institutional barriers such as lack of administrative, staff, or department support for their use of OER.
  • Two-thirds of respondents were unaware of any relevant institutional policy concerning OER. Faculty at teaching-intensive universities and colleges/institutes reported more encouragement to use OER than those at research-intensive universities.

The report contains an additional 6 findings.

Recommendations

In addition to the key findings, the research also makes a number of recommendations aimed at senior institutional administrators on how to support faculty wishing to use OER in their teaching & learning practice. These recommendations include;

  •  First and foremost, institutions should raise awareness of the existence of OER; where to find these materials, how to review their quality, and how to adopt OER for courses. Awareness should also be raised of the pedagogical and financial benefits of OER to students (e.g., cost savings, flexible and permanent access, course performance), instructors (e.g., ability to adapt materials, improved learning outcomes, OER creation as course assignments), and institutions (e.g., enrollment, retention, completion).
  • Institutional support for adaptation and adoption is required to ensure successful adoption of OER. Teaching and Learning Centres as well as Libraries can provide expertise and support on best practices for OER adoption and adaption. Further education is recommended on copyright laws and Creative Commons licenses, preferably through the support of the Library and/or the Institution’s Copyright Office.
  • Internal funding should be provided to support the development or redevelopment of courses to incorporate OER (e.g. OER Resource Grants at Simon Fraser University).
  • Institutional policies concerning OER should be developed and disseminated to help raise awareness, dispel myths, and to encourage members of the university community to adopt open educational practices. These university policies should ideally be tied to the university mission and academic plan.
  • The creation and adaptation of OER should be appropriately recognized as curricular innovation and service to the academic profession during the tenure, promotion, and reappointment process.

The report contains 5 additional recommendations.

Download the full report PDF | Word.

https://bccampus.ca/files/2016/01/BCFacultyUseOfOER_final.pdf

Excerpt from the Report-pdf

Key Findings
1. While faculty at all three institutional types (research-intensive universities, teaching-intensive universities, and colleges/institutes) reported similar adoption patterns of OER, faculty at research-intensive universities were more likely to adapt and create OER than faculty at teaching-intensive universities or colleges/institutes.
2. Faculty who score higher on the personality trait of openness (to experience) were more likely to both adapt and create OER.
3. Regardless of institutional type, the top three reasons faculty reported for using OER were for ideas and inspiration, to supplement existing coursework, and to prepare for teaching.
4. The most frequently used types of OER were videos, images, and open textbooks.
5. A majority of faculty perceive OER to be comparable or superior in quality to traditional, proprietary materials; however, faculty who have adopted OER rate the quality of OER significantly higher than those who have not adopted OER.
6. The barriers of locating high-quality, relevant and up-to-date OER were reported to be significantly lower by faculty at research-intensive universities than by faculty at both teaching-intensive universities or colleges/institutes.
7. Quantitatively, lack of institutional support for use of OER was reported as a more significant barrier by faculty at colleges/institutes than faculty at either teaching-intensive universities or research-intensive universities. However, a qualitative analysis of open-ended responses shows that faculty at all types of institutions face institutional barriers such as lack of administrative, staff, or department support for their use of OER.
8. The availability of up-to-date resources from a reputable producer was reported to be relatively more important by faculty at teaching-intensive universities and colleges/institutes than those at research-intensive universities.
9. On average, respondents agreed that the use of OER in the classroom benefited their students and had a positive impact on their teaching practice.
10. Whereas two-thirds of respondents believe that their students save money by using OER, only one-third of respondents believed that their institution did.
11. Two-thirds of respondents were unaware of any relevant institutional policy concerning OER. Faculty at teaching-intensive universities and colleges/institutes reported more encouragement to use OER than those at research-intensive universities.
These findings are expanded on in this report.

Recommendations
Based on the research findings the following recommendations are suggested to reduce the barriers of using OER in courses and to successfully advocate for mainstream adoption of OER:
1. Institutional commitment to OER. First and foremost, institutions should raise awareness of the existence of OER; where to find these materials, how to review their quality, and how to adopt OER for courses. Awareness should also be raised of the pedagogical and financial benefits of OER to students (e.g., cost savings, flexible and permanent access, course performance), instructors (e.g., ability to adapt materials, improved learning outcomes, OER creation as course assignments), and institutions (e.g., enrolment, retention, completion). Awareness can be raised through workshops, panels (e.g., during Open Education week or other designated professional development periods), and other information sessions. These efforts might be spearheaded by institutional working groups that include students, librarians, faculty representatives, teaching and learning centre staff, administrators, and other internal stakeholders (e.g., Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Open Studies Working Group).
2. Support for adaptation and adoption is required to ensure successful adoption of OER. Teaching and Learning Centres as well as Libraries can provide expertise and support on best practices for OER adoption and adaption. Further education is recommended on copyright laws and Creative
10 Four participants noted that this question was phrased ambiguously.
EXPLORING FACULTY USE OF OER AT BC POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS| 33
Commons licenses, preferably through the support of the Library and/or the Institution’s Copyright Office.
3. Sufficient time to create, adapt, and adopt OER is a significant barrier to using OER in a course. Institutions and departments should provide release time or paid educational leave to faculty to create, adapt, and/or adopt OER.
4. Internal funding should be provided to support the development or redevelopment of courses to incorporate OER (e.g. OER Resource Grants at Simon Fraser University11) as well as the development of ancillary materials (e.g. video tutorials12, question banks13, etc). Investing in the development of ancillary resources eliminates a major barrier to open textbook adoption for faculty who rely heavily on publisher-provided resources.
5. Institutional policies concerning OER should be developed and disseminated to help raise awareness, dispel myths, and to encourage members of the university community to adopt open educational practices. These university policies should ideally be tied to the university mission and academic plan.
6. The creation and adaptation of OER should be appropriately recognized as curricular innovation and service to the academic profession during the tenure, promotion, and reappointment process at research-intensive universities. Without this recognition, the benefits of open educational practices will be slow to accrue at research-intensive universities.
7. Faculty should be encouraged and incentivized to review open textbooks that are available in their areas of specialization. Reviewing open textbooks helps raise awareness of their existence and negates perceptions of inferior quality while also serving as a gateway to adoption and adaptation. The BC OTP offers a $250 honorarium to qualified faculty reviewers14; however, institutions could augment this support or otherwise recognize these efforts.
8. Faculty should be encouraged to pilot the use of OER within their courses, whether as a replacement for a paid, proprietary resource or even as a supplementary resource. These might include, for example, materials from MIT OpenCourseWare15, open textbooks from the BC OTP16, or open source software like R17. A pilot adoption of an open textbook may also be a viable approach in cases of multi-section courses in which textbooks are selected by committee. Because students in participating pilot sections will not incur any textbook costs, the fear that students switching sections or repeating a course will have to purchase another textbook will be allayed.
9. Faculty should be encouraged to design and assign non-disposable course assignments that, for example, involve students in the creation and adaptation of OER (e.g. the University of California at
11 See http://www.sfu.ca/oergrants.html
12 See http://www.neuroanatomy.ca/
13 See http://thatpsychprof.com/the-great-psychology-testbank-sprint/
14 See http://open.bccampus.ca/call-for-proposals/call-for-reviewers-2/
15 See ocw.mit.edu
16 See http://open.bccampus.ca/
17 See https://www.r-project.org/
EXPLORING FACULTY USE OF OER AT BC POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS| 34

Davis’ ChemWiki project18). These efforts require education and support through, for example, professional development workshops offered by the university teaching and learning centre.
10. Faculty as well as staff at teaching and learning centres should be encouraged to design and conduct research to investigate the impact of OER adoption on educational outcomes such as course performance, program completion, and student retention. Results from this research should be disseminated widely within the institution to support evidence-based decision-making concerning OER policies and practices. Internal funding to support this research is also highly desirable.

Conclusion
Adopting open educational practices holds great promise in terms significant cost savings, innovative pedagogy, and improved educational outcomes. The results of this survey and the accompanying recommendations provide a road map for institutions not only in British Columbia, but elsewhere who are looking to reap these benefits.

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November 12, 2014

Do Open Educational Resources make a difference in the classroom? An online survey developed by BCcampus and U.K.-based OER Research Hub is being used to collect data to quantify the efficacy of OER

Open Educational Resources have been popular topics for BCcampus; we’ve explored the economics of open, the intersection of open education and technology, and additional relevant posts. Collaborating with the OER Research Hub to gather empirical evidence about the efficacy of open education provides an opportunity to accurately analyze the challenges facing the faculty and administration throughout the province regarding the Open Textbook project.

BCcampus was chosen to provide support for the Open Textbook project by The BC Ministry of Advanced Education. The goal of the project is to help reduce costs to students and make higher education more accessible by creating a collection of open textbooks. The initial project was to create textbooks to support the top 40 subject areas in the province with the highest enrolment, and in 2014 was expanded to include an additional 20 textbooks to target trades and skills training.

The Open Educational Resources Research Hub was created to identify and quantify the value of openness, answering the question, “What is the impact of OER on learning and teaching practices?” The project is supported by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and is based out of the Open University’s Institute of Educational Technology. The OER Research Hub is currently comprised of seven individuals, and the team was carefully selected for their ability to apply the academic and research proficiency required to ensure the success of the project. “There are many great projects creating Open Educational Resources, but not a huge amount of research on the impact of OER,” said Dr. Beck Pitt, research assistant at the OER Research Hub. “Our methodologies enable us to conduct the comparative research across different contexts and is structured by eleven hypotheses focused on a range of impacts of OER.”

To compile data to better understand the needs of the faculty and students in B.C., an online survey has been created and approved through the ethical advisory board at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, led by Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani. The survey will be used to provide faculty across the province a voice in the project and the opportunity to contribute to its success.

The survey will examine the efficacy of OER, providing empirical data to better understand the barriers to OER adoption in the classroom and how the faculty and administration feel about the process. The timing of the survey is appropriate, as the research is expected to uncover opportunities that BCcampus can address and correct while there is time left in the project.

“We’ll have a pool of data we can add to other sources of data, from projects like OpenStax and Siyavula, that we can aggregate to get a global snapshot as to where open educational resources are,” said Clint Lalonde, BCcampus Senior Manager of Open Education. “Collaborating with OER Research Hub gives us the opportunity to ensure our project has an impact not only within B.C., but outside of the province as well.”

The survey will be made available to:

  • Anyone who has reviewed a copy of a textbook for BCcampus
  • Anyone who has adopted a textbook
  • Members of the BCcampus mailing lists
  • Visitors to bccampus.ca

Survey participants will be entered in a draw to win one of ten Amazon Kindles, fully stocked with a selection of current titles from the B.C Open Textbook project.

 

BCcampus Open textbook adoption Faculty survey Nov 2014

http://survey.bccampus.ca/index.php/775343/lang-en

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Open textbook adoption: Faculty survey

This online survey of BC post-secondary faculty is part of a project which is investigating how faculty think about and use open textbooks and other open educational resources, as well as the factors that facilitate or inhibit their adoption in the classroom.

Please note that all of the questions in this survey are optional.

CONSENT FORM

Principal Investigator: Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani, Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Co-investigators: Clint Lalonde (BCcampus), Dr. Beck Pitt (OER Research Hub/The Open University, UK), Dr. Christina Hendricks (University of British Columbia), and Dr. Jessie Key (Vancouver Island University)

REB Application #: 2014-046

This consent form explains the research study you are being asked to join. Please review this form carefully and ask any questions about the study before you agree to join. You may also ask questions at any time after joining the study. See below for persons to contact.

Voluntary participation:

Your participation in this research project is completely voluntary. All questions in the online survey are optional and you may withdraw from the research study at any time by closing your browser. Clicking “Next” below indicates that you have read and understood this form and consent to participate in this research.

You should ask the principal investigator listed below any questions you may have about this research study. You may ask him questions in the future if you do not understand something that is being done. Consenting to participate in this research project does not waive your rights to legal recourse in the event of research related harm.

Purpose of the study:

This online survey of BC post-secondary instructors is part of a project which is investigating how faculty think about and use open textbooks and other open educational resources, as well as the factors that facilitate or inhibit their adoption in the classroom.

Procedures:

The online survey includes closed- and open-ended questions that gather information about your experience with open educational resources. The survey should take around 20 minutes to complete.

Risks of harm/discomforts/inconvenience:

There are no risks associated with participating in this research study.

Benefits:

Your answers will help us build a picture of how instructors in BC use open educational resources for learning and teaching, including the factors that facilitate or inhibit their adoption in the classroom. Our research data will help educators around the world make more informed decisions about the adoption of open textbooks and other open educational resources.

Compensation:

There is no compensation offered in exchange for your participation in this study; however, you may enter your name into a draw to receive one of ten Kindle e-readers.

Confidentiality:

By answering the survey questions, you are granting the research team use of your data for research and dissemination purposes. Although you are not asked to provide your name, in some cases your answers to a few demographic questions about your academic background and the institution at which you work could indirectly identify you. Please note, however, that you may choose not to answer these questions and that all of the questions in this survey are optional.

At the end of the survey you will be invited to provide contact details should you wish to participate in further research. This is entirely optional and will be done using a separate web-form that is not linked to your responses to the questions in the survey.

The results of this study may be presented at conferences and published in academic journals; however only group averages and trends will be reported. The data collected during this study will be stored securely (using password protected and encrypted data files) and accessible only to the principal investigator and the co-investigators. Our data protection policy complies with British Columbia’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and the UK’s Data Protection Act (1988). At this time there is no plan to destroy the data as it may be used for future analyses, including investigations of changes over time in attitudes towards open textbooks and other open educational resources.

Persons to contact:

If you want to talk to anyone about this research study because you think you have not been treated fairly or think you have been hurt by joining the study, or if you have any other questions about the study, you should the principal investigator, Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani, at 604-599-3253 or rajiv.jhangiani@kpu.ca or the Kwantlen Office of Research and Scholarship at 604-599-2373.

Once you have read and understood this consent form please click “Next” below to indicate your willingness to take part in the study.

There are 38 questions in this survey.

What is your age?

What is your gender?

What is your first spoken language?

Which institution(s) do you work at?

What is your highest educational qualification?

What kind of teaching do you do?

Which of the following apply to you?

For how many years have you been teaching?

—————————————————————————————————–

In which of these ways, if any, have you used or created Open Educational Resources?

Which, if any, of the following types of open educational resources have you used for teaching/training?

Have you used, or are you using, BCcampus Open Textbooks?

If you are aware of BCcampus Open Textbooks, how did you learn about them?

For which of the following purposes have you used open educational resources in the context of your teaching/training?

In the context of your role as instructor, what has been your experience of using OER at your institution?

Which challenges, if any, do you most often face in using open educational resources?

Which of the following factors would make you more likely to select a particular resource when searching for open educational content?

Teaching with Open Educational Resources – Based on your experiences as a instructor, to what extent do you agree with the following statements?

 

Based on your experiences as an instructor, how would you rate the quality of OER when compared with traditional, proprietary materials?

Do you believe that your students have saved money by using open educational resources?

Do you think that your institution benefits financially by using open educational resources?

To what extent do you agree with the following statements about the impact on your teaching practice of your using open educational resources?

What kinds of practices and policies, if any, does your institution have in relation to open educational resources?

Are you aware of any changes to policy and/or practice that have taken place at your institution as a result of participation in OER pilots and/or programs?

In the context of your role as instructor, what kinds of policies would help you to be more open?

 

In the context of your role as instructor, what barriers, if any, have you encountered when using OER in your institution?

Do you recognise the logo above?

How important is open licensing to you when using resources in your teaching?

What does “openness” in education mean to you?

Do you share any of your teaching materials publicly?

Please explain the reasons behind your answer to the previous question: Why do you share your teaching materials publicly (or not), and why do you/do you not allow them to be revised an reused?

Are there any institutional or policy barriers that affect your decision whether and how to share your teaching materials publicly? If so, please explain:

In which of these ways, if any, have you accessed the Internet during the past three months?

Which of these things have you done in the last year?

Here are a number of personality traits that may or may not apply to you. Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. You should rate the extent to which the pair of traits applies to you, even if one characteristic applies more strongly than the other.

—————————————————————————————————–

1

About You

What is your age?

Only numbers may be entered in this field.

Answer

What is your gender?

Check any that apply

Male

Female

Transgender

Other:

What is your first spoken language?

Check any that apply

English

French

Other:

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2

About Your Work

Which institution(s) do you work at?

Check any that apply

British Columbia Institute of Technology

Camosun College

Capilano University

College of New Caledonia

College of the Rockies

Douglas College

Emily Carr University of Art and Design

Justice Institute of British Columbia

Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Langara College

North Island College

Northern Lights College

Nicola Valley Institute of Technology

Northwest Community College

Okanagan College

Royal Roads University

Selkirk College

Simon Fraser University

Thompson Rivers University (inc. Open Learning)

University of British Columbia

University of the Fraser Valley

University of Northern British Columbia

University of Victoria

Vancouver Community College

Vancouver Island University

Yukon College

Prefer not to answer

Other:

What is your highest educational qualification?

Check any that apply

High School Diploma

Attended College

Associates Degree (Two Year)

Bachelors Degree

Masters Degree

PhD or Professional Doctorate

No Formal Qualification

Other:

What kind of teaching do you do? (Check any that apply)

Check any that apply

Full-time face-to-face teaching

Part-time face-to-face teaching

Full-time distance/online teaching

Part-time distance/online teaching

Full-time blended (face-to-face and distance/online) teaching

Part-time blended (face-to-face and distance/online) teaching

Work-based training

Other:

Which of the following apply to you? (Check all that apply)

Check any that apply

Classroom Instructor

Department Chair

Technology Integration Specialist

Technology Director

Curriculum Director

Administrator

Other:

For how many years have you been teaching?

Check any that apply

Under 1 year

1 to 3 years

4 to 6 years

7 to 10 years

Over 10 years

—————————————————————————————————–

3

Your Use of Open Educational Resources

Open Educational Resources are teaching, learning or research materials that are in the public domain or released with an intellectual property license that allows for free use, adaptation, and distribution.

Open educational resources can be in many formats, including open textbooks, complete courses and small assets such as videos. Many free online resources are open educational resources.

In which of these ways, if any, have you used or created Open Educational Resources?

Check any that apply

I have used open educational resources

I have adapted open educational resources to fit my needs

I have created open educational resources for study or teaching

I have created resources myself and published them on an open licence

I have added a resource to a repository

I have added comments to a repository regarding the quality of a resource

I have added comments to a repository suggesting ways of using a resource

I have not used or created open educational resources

Other:

Which, if any, of the following types of open educational resources have you used for teaching/training?

Check any that apply

Open textbooks

Whole course

Elements of a course (e.g. a module/unit)

Videos

Audio podcasts

Images

Infographics

Interactive games

Lectures

Lesson plans

Tutorials

Quizzes

E-books

Data sets

Learning tools, instruments and plug-ins

Other:

Have you used, or are you using, BCcampus Open Textbooks?

Yes

No

If you are aware of BCcampus Open Textbooks, how did you learn about them?

Answer

If you have not used a BCcampus open textbook, which of the following reasons contributed to this decision (select all that apply):

Check any that apply

No textbook available for my discipline/course

Poor quality of open textbook

Lack of additional instructor resources (such as image gallery, test bank, or instructor manual)

Lack of support from colleagues/Department to change textbook

Lack of time to transition to new textbook

Other:

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4

Your Experience with Open Educational Resources

For which of the following purposes have you used open educational resources in the context of your teaching/training?

Check any that apply

To prepare for my teaching/training

To get new ideas and inspiration

To supplement my existing lessons or coursework

As “assets” (e.g. images or text extracts) within a classroom lesson

To give to learners as compulsory self-study materials

To give to learners as optional self-study materials

To provide e-learning materials to online learners

To compare them with my own teaching/training materials in order to assess the quality of my materials

To broaden the range of my teaching methods

To broaden the range of resources available to my learners

To make my teaching more culturally diverse [or responsive]

To enhance my professional development

To stay up-to-date in a subject or topic area

To learn about a new topic

To engage my students more fully in a topic area

To connect with instructors or learners who have similar interests (e.g. by reading comments they have posted about resources)

To interest hard-to-engage learners

Other:

In the context of your role as instructor, what has been your experience of using OER at your institution?

Answer

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5

Factors that Influence Using Open Educational Resources

Which challenges, if any, do you most often face in using open educational resources?

Check any that apply

Overcoming technology problems when downloading resources

Knowing where to find resources

Finding suitable resources in my subject area

Finding resources of sufficiently high quality

Finding resources that are up-to-date

Finding resources that are relevant to my local context

Getting work colleagues/managers to accept the use of open educational resources

Not being skilled enough to edit resources to suit my own context

Not knowing whether I have permission to use, change or modify resources

Not having enough time to look for suitable resources

Not having connections with open educational resource-using peers who could be a source of support

Missing/needing the support of a tutor or instructor to help me work through open course materials

Not knowing how to use the resources in the classroom

Not having enough time/opportunities to experiment with using open educational resources in the classroom

Lacking institutional support for my use of open educational resources

Resources not being aligned with professional standards or regulation

Other:

Which of the following factors would make you more likely to select a particular resource when searching for open educational content?

Check any that apply

Evidence of interest in that resource (e.g. lots of downloads)

The resource being recently created, uploaded or updated

The resource being easy to download

A description of learning objectives or outcomes being provided

The resource being created/uploaded by a reputable/trusted institution or person

The resource having a Creative Commons license

The resource having an open license allowing adaptation

The length/complexity of the resource

Use of interactive or multi-media content (e.g. video or quiz) in the resource

Positive user ratings or comments about the resource

Personal recommendation

Having previously used this resource successfully

The resource being relevant to my particular interests/needs

The resource having a catchy title or attractive image(s)

Being required to use a resource for a project or study task

The resource having previously been used with students

A detailed description of the resource content being provided

Other:

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6

Teaching with Open Educational Resources

Based on your experiences as a instructor, to what extent do you agree with the following statements?

“Use of Open Educational Resources in the classroom…”

Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ participation in class discussions             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ interest in the subjects taught             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ satisfaction with the learning experience             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Leads to improved students’ grades             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Builds learners’ confidence             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Develops learners’ increased independence and self-reliance             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Allows me to better accommodate diverse learners’ needs             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ engagement with lesson content             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ experimentation with new ways of learning             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases collaboration and/or peer-support among learners             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Increases learners’ enthusiasm for future study             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Leads to learners becoming interested in a wider range of subjects than before they used OER             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Please provide evidence, or tell us more about any experience, which supports your responses to the previous question’s statements.

Answer

Based on your experiences as an instructor, how would you rate the quality of OER when compared with traditional, proprietary materials?

“The quality of OER when compared with traditional, proprietary materials is usually…”

Check any that apply

Comment only when you choose an answer.

Significantly worse Make a comment on your choice here:

Slightly worse Make a comment on your choice here:

Comparable Make a comment on your choice here:

Slight better Make a comment on your choice here:

Significantly better Make a comment on your choice here:

—————————————————————————————————–

7

The Impact of Using Open Educational Resources

Do you believe that your students have saved money by using open educational resources?

Check any that apply

Yes

No

Don’t Know

Do you think that your institution benefits financially by using open educational resources?

Check any that apply

Yes

No

Don’t Know

To what extent do you agree with the following statements about the impact on your teaching practice of your using open educational resources?

Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I have broadened my coverage of the curriculum             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I use a broader range of teaching and learning methods             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I have improved information and communication technology skills             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I make use of a wider range of multimedia             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I make more use of culturally diverse resources             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I have a more up-to-date knowledge of my subject area             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I reflect more on the way that I teach             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I more frequently compare my own teaching with others             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I now use OER study to develop my teaching             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

I collaborate more with colleagues             Strongly Disagree             Disagree        Neither Agree nor Disagree             Agree             Strongly Agree

Please provide evidence, or tell us more about any experience, which supports your responses to the previous question’s statements.

Answer

—————————————————————————————————–

8

Institutional Policies Concerning Open Educational Resources

What kinds of practices and policies, if any, does your institution have in relation to open educational resources?

Answer

Are you aware of any changes to policy and/or practice that have taken place at your institution as a result of participation in OER pilots and/or programs?

Check any that apply

Yes

No

Don’t Know

In the context of your role as instructor, what kinds of policies would help you to be more open?

Answer

In the context of your role as instructor, what barriers, if any, have you encountered when using OER in your institution?

Answer

—————————————————————————————————–

9

Open Licensing

“A license is a document that specifies what can and cannot be done with a work (whether sound, text, image or multimedia). It grants permissions and states restrictions. Broadly speaking, an open license is one which grants permission to access, re-use and redistribute a work with few or no restrictions.”

Open Definition (http://opendefinition.org/guide/)

Logo – Creative Commons double CC in circle

Do you recognise the logo above?

Check any that apply

I’ve never seen it

I’ve seen it but I don’t know what it means

I’ve seen it and I know what it means

How important is open licensing to you when using resources in your teaching?

Check any that apply

Very important

Important

Moderately important

Of little importance

Unimportant

—————————————————————————————————–

10

What does “openness” in education mean to you?

Answer

Do you share any of your teaching materials publicly?

Check any that apply

No, but I share them with colleagues or others when asked

No, I don’t share any of my teaching materials with anyone but students

Yes, they are publicly viewable and I put a license on them that allows them to be revised and reused

Yes, they are publicly viewable but I don’t have a license on them that allows them to be revised and reused

Other:

Please explain the reasons behind your answer to the previous question: Why do you share your teaching materials publicly (or not), and why do you/do you not allow them to be revised an reused?

Answer

Are there any institutional or policy barriers that affect your decision whether and how to share your teaching materials publicly? If so, please explain:

Answer

—————————————————————————————————–

11

About Your Use of Computers and the Internet

In which of these ways, if any, have you accessed the Internet during the past three months?

Check any that apply

Via an Internet-enabled mobile phone (smartphone)

Via a tablet computer or iPad

At home using a broadband connection

At home using a dial-up connection

Via a video game console

At work

At an educational institution

At a community facility (e.g. a library)

Via a commercial facility (e.g. cyber cafe)

Other:

Which of these things have you done in the last year?

Check any that apply

Sent an email

Written a document using word processing software (e.g. Word)

Used presentation software (e.g. Powerpoint)

Performed calculations with spreadsheet software (e.g. Excel)

Contributed to a Wiki (e.g. Wikipedia)

Published a blog post (e.g. WordPress, Blogger)

Shared an image online (e.g. Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest)

Posted on a microblogging platform (e.g. Twitter, Tumblr)

Took part in a videochat (e.g. Skype)

Contributed to an Internet forum

Contributed to a social network (e.g. Facebook, Google+, MySpace, Beebo)

Used cloud-based storage (e.g. Dropbox, Google Drive)

Shopped Online (e.g. eBay, Amazon)

Downloaded a Podcast (e.g. iTunes)

Downloaded a file using a torrent client (e.g. Bittorrent, UTorrent)

Filmed and uploaded video content

Used a learning management system to study or teach (e.g. Moodle, Blackboard)

Recorded and uploaded a podcast

—————————————————————————————————–

12

A Little More About You

Here are a number of personality traits that may or may not apply to you. Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. You should rate the extent to which the pair of traits applies to you, even if one characteristic applies more strongly than the other.

I see myself as:

Extraverted, enthusiastic. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Critical, quarrelsome. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Dependable, self-disciplined. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Anxious, easily upset. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Open to new experiences, complex. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Reserved, quiet. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Sympathetic, warm. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Disorganized, careless. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Calm, emotionally stable. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

Conventional, uncreative. __Disagree Strongly – Disagree Moderately – Disagree a Little – Neither Agree nor Disagree – Agree a Little – Agree Moderately – Agree Strongly

—————————————————————————————————–

13

Draw for an E-reader

Please enter your name and email address if you would like to be entered into the draw for one of ten Kindle E-readers.

Name

E-mail address

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