2015-09-27 – Don Gorges Posts September 5 to September 26

Don Gorges Open Design Pearl Algorithm API

Commenting on Topics with Connected Points of View


Don Gorges

Don Gorges

Visual Communications in Educational Resources,
Open Design, Creative Services, Marketing

Don Gorges commented on this

Maree Conway

Discussions of business model reengineering and innovation in higher education tend to focus on program design, technology, data, and marketing challenges and on delivery, organizational, revenue, and outsourcing models—along with the myriad other moving parts of the modern organization. Even though traditionalists and romantics would rather not think about these questions, which they view as a neoliberal “corporatization” of the academy, getting the organizational questions wrong can imperil the academic mission for which all colleges and universities exist—especially in these turbulent times for higher education. Still, for those of us who are thinking hard about innovation and new business models, two critical components are too often missing from our discussions: people and culture.
  1. __In reading about SNHU, my thoughts were of people at Ryerson, an exemplar in University innovation and culture and communication [proud alumni] _ Information on the Ontario PSE initiative in this Overview of the Strategic Mandate Agreement Proposals of Ontario’s Public Colleges and Universities: _ http://www.contactnorth.ca/trends-directions/overview-strategic-mandate-agreement-proposals-ontarios-public-colleges-and _

  1. Thanks Don I’ll follow that up. We need more exemplars in this area.

Strategic Mandate Agreements discussion lead by Ontario Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities:
Strengthening Ontario’s Centres of Creativity Innovation and Knowledge




Don Gorges commented on this

Thomas Lockwood, PhD

You can only see so many photos of beautiful sunsets before you start to get a little tired. Here’s a camera that will prevent you from taking such cliched pictures in the first place. #technology

This Camera Won’t Let You Take the Photo Everyone Else Does

This Camera Won’t Let You Take the Photo Everyone Else Does

wired.com
The German designer has developed a camera that allows the user to take only original photos. [-] That a piece of technology can judge creativity on something as quantitative as geo-tags is both fascinating and discomforting. “A lot of people are really offended by the idea,” Schmidt says. There are some inherent flaws in the logic, which he readily cops to.

A disobedient tool for taking unique photographs, Camera Restricta

Philipp Schmitt  Camera Restricta Project Video _ https://vimeo.com/137595414 _ prototype uses GPS metadata from Flickr and Panoramio to determine how popular a location is. If it identifies more than 35 photos taken in a given location—about 115 feet in any direction from where you’re standing—the camera’s shutter retracts and blocks the viewfinder so you can’t take a photo. A display on the camera indicates how many photos have been taken in that location, and an audible cue reminds you to move along.” __ potential iterations which offer camera / or smartphone viewing of an uploaded gallery of the “best” images captured at that location . . . for creative inspiration?

Originality can be driven by new perspectives. Not being able to take a photo of sunset because everyone is doing it is not going to help us appreciate sunset individually. This to me contradicts what modern photography is progressively evolving to. We only have one sun but the way we see it doesn’t have to be the same and originality with only the location as a variable is a broad stereotype. The photographer is ultimately responsible to define originality after time spent on understanding all existing solutions to given subject. The better photographer will see opportunity for originality despite of the clutters. I’m not convinced that camera won’t help us take more original photos, people will.



Don Gorges commented on this

The Educational Publishing Gap, OR Markets Unserved

Timothy Moore on LinkedIn

Over the last 20 years, the major US higher educational publishers have abandoned publishing books and courseware for any but the top 200 courses offered in higher ed.

That leaves around 4,000 regularly taught, standard courses for which there are few or no textbooks available (Source: Market Data Retrieval, a D&B Company). Most, if not all, of these courses are taught in 4 year programs, so set aside the Community College market for this article. Some of these abandoned courses typically enroll large numbers of students, very often 100+ at state universities, for instance. In fact, it may be safe to estimate that more than 40% of total FTE enrollments are represented by these courses.

[—] Someone should fill this gap, whether a start up or some other publishing company. Here are some reasons why:

• The market opportunity.
• The revenue associated with upper level textbooks is predictable and budgetable; each year more or less the same number of students take Course X in the US, and an entrant would likely have the only text available for over 90% of those offerings, I would estimate;
• There is an eager and ready talent pool that will welcome the opportunity to write texts again;
• It will bring good will to that entrant from institutions and professors, and from students as well—particularly if the entrant’s pricing strategy undermines current pricing strategies;
• These texts have been traditionally relatively easy to market, and would be especially so in our current search-dominated world;
• There is currently virtually no competition; it is Blue Ocean;
• And because these markets are global, the entrant can sell the English language versions to third parties for international distribution and sell Foreign Language Rights as well.
• It will be highly profitable: upper level texts were enjoying 40%+ net profit margins.

All of which leads to a stable and highly profitable business. A legacy business with upside. Who wants to seize this opportunity? It is there for the taking.

  1. Dr Glenn Rothberg

    I enjoyed your article. It provokes an additional way to address the issue of the abandonment of traditional textbook publishing in higher education. I would ask: why should students, academics and publishers continue to rely upon texts? And if they did, is it not time for one that picks up some uncommon common threads? The availability of traditional textbooks has been largely supplanted by other sources of information and services for students. And, unlike the texts, the courses have not been similarly abandoned: yet your note is silent on our understanding of how these (best) practices have changed in education and publishing. Perhaps it is the change in best practice, and the role of ideas in those changes where the real opportunity is to be found? For example, missing is an explanation of what links the four phenomena that you have mentioned: first, the apparent publisher ‘abandonment mystery’; second, the apparent survival of students without texts; third the apparent survival of courses and academics without texts; and fourth, the local, global and foreign language growth of the higher education market has moved on, largely with a reduction in texts. Maybe the opportunity is in the linkages?

 

17h

Peter Janzow

Thanks for another thought-provoking article, Tim. I agree with much of what Dr Glenn Rothberg outlines below – the concept of a “national market” for advanced texts may have gone the way of the 8 Track tape. Or perhaps it’s just evolving, more like MTV – or even vinyl, which has made a comeback in recent years. So maybe there *is* an unserved market for limited print run advanced textbooks. Certainly friends like Bill Webber at Sloan Publishing continue to serve their disciplines with the same dedication and engagement as in the old “P-H” days.

The interconnected nature of academic scholarship and best practice for teaching is certainly a driver – and the publishing/media marketplace has responded with a wide and diverse range of alternative platforms that leverage those connections – from ebook and digital library programs to self-publishing (at any number of sites) to peer-to-peer exchange of course and lecture notes and supporting materials. And don’t forget competition from the de facto global information standard, wikipedia.

Perhaps the old textbook model has been flipped? In watching my own children progress through college, I have seen them interact differently with what you and I would have called “course materials” in the old days. No longer is there a standard textbook to guide their journey – instead their instructors provide topic lists and syllabi, and the learners are asked to curate their own source materials and justify their selections, with wikipedia as a starting point but going out to the universe of other connected sites and resources now at their fingertips. Student-to-student networks have emerged to remove some of the work for each learner, and the process is much more constructivist, chaotic, and less standard than in the past.

__Timothy, please offer your MDR source link supporting this info “[-]. . . That leaves around 4,000 regularly taught, standard courses for which there are few or no textbooks available (Source: Market Data Retrieval, a D&B Company).”    Thanks, Don.

Likely will be found in this Education Market Research, Market Data Retrieval

MDR-College-Catalog.pdf

http://schooldata.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/MDR-College-Catalog.pdf

Market Data Retrieval MDR education market research 01

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Creative Commons Open Licensing Policy Toolkit

__Am considering pos/neg effects to the market for Ontario Creative Sector Copyright work _ “Work that must be licensed under CC BY includes new content created using [U.S. Federal Grant] funds, modifications made to pre-existing, grantee-owned content using grant funds, and new works and modifications made to pre-existing works commissioned from third parties using grant funds.” _ https://lnkd.in/eFVTz8d

Creative Commons Model U.S. Federal Grant Open Policy Language 01

Creative Commons, Model U.S. Federal Grant Open Policy Language

Appendix A:

A Creative Commons Model of U.S. Federal Grant Open Policy Language

docs.google.com

A Creative Commons Model of U.S. Federal Grant Open Policy Language

Intellectual Property Requirements

To ensure that the Federal investment of these funds has a significant multiplier effect, as broad an impact as possible, be cost-effective, and to encourage innovation in the development of new learning materials, as a condition of the receipt of a [insert grant name] grant, the grantee will be required to license to the public all work (except for computer software source code, discussed below) created with the support of the grant under the Creative Commons Attribution license, version 4.0 or later (CC BY). Work that must be licensed under CC BY includes new content created using grant funds, modifications made to pre-existing, grantee-owned content using grant funds, and new works and modifications made to pre-existing works commissioned from third parties using grant funds.

15h



__Table of Contents scope is covered in only 24 pages [possibly a typo] and is priced at $2,295 _ https://lnkd.in/ex2RM5A __ https://lnkd.in/efEVeQU

Adaptive Learning: Best Practice Review and Future Outlook

outsellinc.com

Outsell Inc. – The report looks at whether adaptive learning really is the holy grail for educational publishing, how it is being implemented successfully by key content providers such as Pearson (NYSE: PSO), Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (NASDAQ: HMHC), Cengage Learning (OTCMKTS: CNGO), and McGraw-Hill Education, what the challenges are to the successful deployment of an adaptive learning offering, and how the future of this marketplace will manifest. It also contains a market map of the key technology providers in this space – including Knewton, CogBooks, Smart Sparrow, Snapwiz, and Knowledge Factor – and lays out a set of three scenarios outlining the potential for adaptive learning’s adoption in the education market over the coming decade.

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Don Gorges

__Open Licensing Policy Toolkit. “Introduction – The American people deserve open access to federally funded digital educational, training, and informational materials because they paid for them with tax dollars.” _ I just started reading and see interesting questions in the opening premise if it’s assumed that the price paid = value of the copyright to the creators _ Ontario Creative Sector is my interest _ https://lnkd.in/e9dmvez

Creative Commons Open Licensing Policy Toolkit

Creative Commons Open Licensing Policy Toolkit

creativecommons.org

To support the education of government staff creating, adopting and implementing open licensing policies – we’ve created an Open Licensing Policy Toolkit. While this draft is tailored for U.S. government federal staff, it can easily be revised to meet the needs of any country. We share it here under a CC BY 4.0 license hoping others will take, improve, and modify it to meet regional, national and/or local needs. We look forward to seeing what you create… and we are happy to collaborate with you should you identify an opportunity to work with your government on broad open licensing requirements on publicly funded resources.

Open Licensing Policy Toolkit.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ZKozpL3mZ5gOTJaql1DWcSwzwSR7OY3rpq7eTFvvCu0/edit#heading=h.2g4juz6dmkwg

Creative Commons Open Licensing Policy Toolkit 01

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Don Gorges

__David Wiley gives us a sense of his pitch to a potential client of Lumen Learning i.e. a Community College Provost _ https://lnkd.in/e-cgZ4y

David Wiley Video The Financial Potentials of Open Educational Resources

David Wiley: The Financial Potentials of Open Educational Resources

YouTube

David Wiley is is Co-Founder and Chief Academic Officer of Lumen Learning.

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Don Gorges commented on this

TC Transcontinental Printing

Did you know that innovation is constantly occurring in the print industry?

Insights – Print : Still an Innovative and Engaging Medium

Insights – Print : Still an Innovative and Engaging Medium

image.s.transcontinentalmedia.com

There is a tendency to think that well-established channels have little new to offer. Nothing could be further from the truth with print, where innovation is constantly occurring. Of course, it’s always wise to remember that print maintains several advantages even without adding bells or whistles. Studies indicate that:

  • Print dominates as the most trusted medium.
  • Young audiences prefer print.
  • Print involves more emotional processing and information retention, which are important to brand association.

According to Scientific American, while e-readers and tablets are becoming more popular as the technologies improve, research suggests that reading on paper still boasts unique advantages. There is ongoing evidence from lab experiments, consumer reports and polls indicating that modern screens and e-readers fail to adequately recreate certain tactile experiences of reading on paper that many people miss. The on-screen reading experience subtly inhibits reading comprehension in a number of ways.

Don Gorges

  1. __”evidence from [-] reports indicates that modern screens and e-readers fail to adequately recreate certain tactile experiences of reading on paper that many people miss and, more importantly, prevent people from navigating long texts in an intuitive and satisfying way. In turn, such navigational difficulties may subtly inhibit reading comprehension.” _ read more in Scientific American, The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: Why Paper Still Beats Screens __ http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/reading-paper-screens/

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens

E-readers and tablets are becoming more popular as such technologies improve, but research suggests that reading on paper still boasts unique advantages

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Don Gorges

__”So what are some of the personal attributes of open educators?” _ “a nice, rebellious, autonomous lap-dog who likes to adopt Guerilla tactics” says Viv Rolfe

ALT-C 2015 reflections: a heffalump in the auditorium?

_ http://vivrolfe.com/blog/alt-c-2015-reflections-a-heffalump-in-the-auditorium/ _ _ https://lnkd.in/b3uDzeS __ https://lnkd.in/byzRRhY

Questions about online 'openness'

Questions about online ‘openness’

jennymackness.wordpress.com

What is in it for those willing to ‘go open’? Why invest even longer hours in supporting educational practice?

I would describe my practice as one of ‘guarded openness’. I haven’t thrown myself out there and revealed all, as I see some people doing. I find it disturbing when people seem to ‘wash their dirty linen’ in the open. Some things are not meant to be discussed in the open, but should be reserved for private communication between the parties concerned. I also find that group think, constant self-affirmation and self-validation, either individually or as a group, that fails to stand back and look critically at this online behaviour, makes me feel equally uncomfortable. In the past year I have seen so much of these behaviours online. When I joined CCK08, I was really excited by the altruistic sharing of knowledge and learning behind the idea of ‘openness’, but recently it has seemed to me to be more about narcissism than altruism – about getting noticed and building up ‘numbers’ of followers, tweets etc.

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Don Gorges

__Then justify your “academic”decisions in clear, convincing terms. “In short, work through the decision to assign a textbook as you would a research question: Gather information. Weigh competing options and opinions. Move beyond the obvious. Innovate wherever possible. Revise. Seek feedback from peers. Revise again. Then justify your conclusion in clear, convincing terms. __ https://lnkd.in/ecunY5m

Why You Ought to justify academic decisions in clear, convincing terms

m.chronicle.com – by Doug Ward an associate professor of journalism and associate director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at the University of Kansas.

I’m not arguing that textbooks are evil or that instructors who use them are remiss. But here’s what I would like to see teachers do: Before you assign a textbook, check the price. Ask yourself whether students really need it and will truly learn from reading it. Check to see whether an open-source alternative is available. Scour the web and enlist your college’s librarians to find articles and posts that provide the same — or even better — information as in the textbook. Have your students find and recommend readings for your class. Work with colleagues to create a shared pool of effective course materials. Work with your teaching center to improve your approach to using class materials and class time for learning.

In short, work through the decision to assign a textbook as you would a research question: Gather information. Weigh competing options and opinions. Move beyond the obvious. Innovate wherever possible. Revise. Seek feedback from peers. Revise again. Then justify your conclusion in clear, convincing terms.

That’s what you expect your students to do. It’s not easy. But then neither is paying hundreds of dollars a semester for unused textbooks.

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Don Gorges

Coverman’ Chip Kidd Presents: Batman Black and White: The Sketch Covers

societyillustrators.org

Featuring an extraordinary selection of original Batman drawings assembled from the collection of award-winning Designer/Writer Chip Kidd.

In 2013, DC Comics released a brand-new six-issue revival of the legendary Batman: Black and White series. Based on the hugely-popular 1996 publication, each issue of Batman: Black and White features several short-stories written and drawn by top comic writers and artists. In the first Issue, released on September 4th of 2013, Chip Kidd’s short-story titled “Don’t Know Where, Don’t Know When” (co- written by Michael Cho) was featured, and the issue also included a blank variant cover. This blank cover overlap allowed fans to seek out original sketches by their favorite artists, and became a popular collectable.

Since the release of this Issue, Chip Kidd has amassed a diverse collection of covers. For the first time ever, the Society, in support of The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, is proud to display this collection in our MoCCA Gallery.

__Batman. . . Chip Kidd. . . “The Society of Illustrators is hosting an exhibit called “Batman Black and White: The Sketch Covers.” The pieces came from the collection of famed book designer Chip Kidd. The opening reception will take place on Oct. 7. The closing date is Nov. 7.” __ https://lnkd.in/e-T22JW

Society of Illustrators Hosts a Batman Art Show

Society of Illustrators Hosts a Batman Art Show

adweek.com

The Society of Illustrators is hosting an exhibit called “Batman Black and White: The Sketch Covers.” The pieces came from the collection of famed book designer Chip Kidd.

The opening reception will take place on Oct. 7. The closing date is Nov. 7.

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Don Gorges

__I am reading the Ontario Chamber of Commerce (OCC) report – Harnessing-the-Power-of-the-Sharing-Economy.pdf _ https://lnkd.in/ezXWuH2 _ “In a true sharing economy, the reward is gratitude” _ It is interesting to note that Creative Commons paid its’ previous CEO, Catherine Casserly, $377,574 in 2012. That’s grateful, right?_ https://lnkd.in/egCwbMJ __ https://lnkd.in/eCevWrh

In a true sharing economy, the reward is gratitude

In a true sharing economy, the reward is gratitude

theglobeandmail.com by Ryan Merkley

Ryan Merkley is CEO of Creative Commons, a global non-profit organization with chapters in 85 countries that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools.

We need to talk about sharing.

Much has been written about the “sharing economy” – web-enabled services like Uber and Airbnb that allow people to provide rides or rent their homes to strangers. It’s creating new opportunities to make money, and new challenges for established sectors all around the world. Last month, the Ontario Chamber of Commerce released its own report, citing estimates that the global revenue from sharing economy companies in 2015 will be $15-billion.

The problem is that there’s no “sharing” in the sharing economy. The real sharing economy is one built around goodwill, gratitude and mutual benefit, not commerce – it may even be a fundamental element of human evolution.

Sharing shouldn’t require compensation. If you’re paying for it, it’s not actually sharing: It’s just a service. But sharing can still create benefits for those who share, and is vitally important to communities and society. It’s something we shouldn’t distort just because it sounds good in the marketing copy.

__It appears that the OER Strategy Development Drafting Committee has now resolved the outstanding issues. Those who earn their living creating copyright educational resources should take this opportunity to review and comment on the Document’s key purpose, to gain Government Funding through policy changes that redirect public funds from copyright materials to Creative Commons licensed materials __ https://lnkd.in/ecB3RMJ

Foundations for OER Strategy Development DRAFT 1 - 2 Sept 20 10c

Foundations for OER Strategy Development | DRAFT 1.2

docs.google.com _ https://docs.google.com/document/d/1IYDeAmw3aMxuqpfEr_7BEwM5FJiqqX1S4dzPJZQqwTY/edit#

Draft 1.2 Updated: 20 September, 2015

Next Steps

This document is a synthesis of discussions held during an initial strategy meeting and feedback received from the OER community through conferences, meetings and sharing this document on global and local OER lists. We invite the global OER community to share their feedback on any aspect of the document, and particularly welcome feedback on our assessment of the state of OER and the broad priorities of the open education movement. Our aim is to create a document and related activities that support the community to engage in conversations about effective strategies for the adoption of OER, and to promote better coordination between different segments of the community so that we can better support each other.

For the immediate future, we would like to focus the conversations within the OER community. We encourage you to share this document and hold conversations in your OER networks, conferences, seminars and meet-ups. Our goal is to end with a document that is a useful foundation for effective OER strategy development.

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Don Gorges commented on this

__”[Hewlett Foundation] will focus on supporting the development and adoption of open textbooks over the next three to five years while also maintaining a robust infrastructure for the OER field until it becomes self-sustaining.” _ TJ Bliss @tjbliss tweets “It’s not that we’re trying to destroy publishers. It’s just that we don’t care.” @cgreen #oeglobal 7:03 PM – 22 Apr 2015 __ https://lnkd.in/egP4JET

OpenStax Books

Why We Fund Open Textbooks (and Plan to Do More)

hewlett.org

September 16, 2015 — By TJ Bliss and Barbara Chow

Philanthropy can play a catalytic role in pushing OER as a solution to the real problems the education system is experiencing today. Given the growing availability of OER supply, the costs of advancing open textbooks is relatively small as it consists of making policy efforts, filling gaps in supply, marketing, and building awareness.

We recognize that there is a long list of other areas related to OER where our funding could make a significant contribution. These are all within our sights. But for the next few years, we believe open textbooks represent the greatest promise for mainstream adoption of OER.

Don Gorges

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Houghton Mifflin Harcourt writes a new future, developing a range of digital products to reach children and parents with a treasure trove of curious monkeys, hairy-toed hobbits, and cast of characters from Houghton Mifflin’s venerable Reading Textbooks. Creative work, working __ https://lnkd.in/en6mznb

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt writes a new future for itself

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt writes a new future for itself

bostonglobe.com

Linda Zecher wants to put Carmen Sandiego and Curious George to work.

Zecher, the chief executive at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Co., is pushing the Boston textbook publisher beyond the classroom and into people’s homes by mining a treasure trove of curious monkeys, hairy-toed hobbits, and other characters from the company’s small, but venerable trade book division. Since joining the company from Microsoft Corp. four years ago, Zecher has targeted the consumer education market, developing a range of digital products to reach children and parents.

This fall, Houghton launches a new version of its Curious World website and app, in which parents of young kids can pay $10 a month for access to educational games, videos, and e-books. A new app to help kids chase the fictional villain Carmen Sandiego to learn geography will be released by January. And last month, Houghton inked a deal with public television station WGBH to develop a TV program based on the popular children’s book series “Gossie & Friends,” about the adventures of a group of goslings.

Don Gorges

  1. __Creative work with the leading role in a new future _ “When you’re selling to parents, it’s a much different sale than when you’re selling to a school district. . . . [But] it’s a pretty sizable market, if you can position yourself as the brand name [with] the best quality products.”

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Don Gorges commented on this

Some implications of online open publishing

Some implications of online open publishing

tonybates.ca

One of the differences between an online open textbook and a commercial printed textbook is that developments with an open textbook are continuous rather than episodic. Since the April publication of Teaching in a Digital Age, my open, online textbook for faculty and instructors, there have been several developments around the book. Now is an appropriate time to bring readers up to date on these developments, because they indicate some broader issues around open publishing..
    1. __Thanks for the update, Tony, you bring so many interesting issues to light. Just one example “About 80% of the 12,000 downloads are as pdfs, suggesting that people still prefer a more print-like way of reading.” Are Faculty and Students’ expectations being met with the Print Edition? – discuss preferences for attention to visual communications and design – typography in the Print Edition. seeking _”the qualitative information that you need. That comes from readers’ comments, personal e-mails, and casual conversations with colleagues”

      __ I downloaded the PDF to read on screen and assume others do too. Not sure how people have had the pdf photocopied.

__“many savvy students” research and shop online where sources offer students options to pay less for textbooks than a Campus Bookstore price. the example Reading List $587 reduced to less than $100 by “borrowing, renting and sourcing free versions online” __ https://lnkd.in/ephv3dm

Startups Tackling High Price of College Textbooks

Startups Tackling High Price of College Textbooks

bloomberg.com

College textbook prices are on the rise, but several new startups, websites and initiatives are helping students to hit the books without breaking the bank. Bloomberg’s Willem Marx has the story. (Source: Bloomberg)

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Don Gorges

__David Wiley’s company, Lumen Learning, is positioned against education institutions who wish to increase student retention and their college’s profitability by providing their students with access to free textbooks __ https://lnkd.in/ewqwkjs

effectiveness = efficacy x affordability

opencontent.org  David Wiley Blog:

The problem with talking about efficacy is that it completely misses the fact that so many students go without access to textbooks because of their cost:

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Don Gorges

__Andrew Marcinek will serve in the Office of Educational Technology (OET) Open Digital Resources Adviser __ new position created – a great gig! __ https://lnkd.in/eBuQnyV

U.S. Department of Education Announces First-Ever Adviser to Expand Access to Open Digital Resources in Schools

ed.gov

Andrew Marcinek will serve in the Office of Educational Technology (OET) – [he] “has worked on education technology and digital transitions in school districts in both Massachusetts and Pennsylvania, and he’s done extensive research on how to integrate technology at scale in school districts to create a system that is sustainable and equitable for all students.

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Don Gorges commented on this

BCcampus

A quick update on the status of Open Education at BCcampus – including over $1 million saved by B.C. students through the Open Textbook project. http://ow.ly/Sf9zc http://ow.ly/i/d2DkU

BCcampus Open Textbook Project – Fall 2015 Update | BCcampus

BCcampus Open Textbook Project – Fall 2015 Update | BCcampus

bccampus.ca

September 15, 2015

On top of hitting a major financial milestone of over $1 million saved for post-secondary students in B.C, the BCcampus OpenEd team has been busy over the summer: releasing new textbooks, finalizing agreements with other provinces, preparing for the upcoming Open Education Conference, and updating the Common Core Trades and ABE training books.

Open Textbooks save B.C. students $1 million

No matter how you calculate it, the B.C. Open Textbook project is saving money for students around the province, with an estimated savings of $841,700 – $1,140,607.15 as of September 10, 2015.

Creative abstract computer technology, mobility and communication business concept: laptop, notebook or netbook PC, mini tablet computer, touchscreen smartphone and desktop monitor display screen TV isolated on white background

 

  1. __It’s complicated to calculate savings when Students have had online free access to these original open textbooks directly via openstax-saylor et al. __ also complicated to calculate the creative sector losses in reducing published textbook revenue by $1 million. . . as Access Copyright found in their PwC report.

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Don Gorges commented on this

Karen Howe

Wow, today I’m a headliner!

Karen Howe is leaving One Advertising

Karen Howe is leaving One Advertising

marketingmag.ca

 

Don Gorges

  1. __I am excited for you, Karen. All the best.

__”Under Canadian copyright law, duration is determined by the life of the author, and not by the life of the owner of copyright. – This is also true where works are made during the course of employment – copyright is determined based on the life of the author.” __ https://lnkd.in/ew6YJ9W

Canadian Copyright Law: What is the Duration of Copyright in Canada?

Canadian Copyright Law: What is the Duration of Copyright in Canada?

copyrightlaws.com

The Canadian Copyright Act provides the general rule for the length of copyright protection for published works as:

the life of the author, the remainder of the calendar year in which the author dies, and a period of fifty years following the end of that calendar year.

Under this life-plus-fifty rule, an author has copyright in a work he creates throughout his lifetime, and his heirs or assignees have copyright for a period of fifty years until the calendar year end after the author’s death.

Under Canadian copyright law, duration is determined by the life of the author, and not by the life of the owner of copyright.  Where an author sells his copyright and assigns the rights in his work to another person or entity, the duration of copyright is still calculated based on the life of the author . This is also true where works  are made during the course of employment  – copyright is determined based on the life of the author.

 

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Don Gorges

__George Siemens: “adios to technosolutionism that recreates people as agents within a programmed infrastructure – My framework for technologies in the edtech space now, those that I find empowering for learners and reflective of a human and creative-oriented future, includes five elements:” __ https://lnkd.in/ezmjCQA

George Siemens

Adios Ed Tech. Hola something else.

elearnspace.org
George Siemens: I’ve been involved in educational technology since the late 1990′s when I was at Red River College and involved in deploying the first laptop program in Canada. Since that time, I’ve been involved in many technology deployments in learning and in researching those deployments. Some have been systems-level – like a learning management system. Others have been more decentralized and unstructured – like blogs, wikis, and social media.
  1. __George Siemens: “Does the technology foster creativity and personal expression? develop the learner and contribute to her formation as a person? fun and engaging? have the human teacher and/or peer learners at the centre? consider the whole learner? “

__Publishers are repositioning themselves in the market and expanding their marketing efforts to include both Faculty and Students through on-campus events, social media, email blasts and student ambassadors, among other newer marketing strategies. [paraphrasing article] _ https://lnkd.in/eqWvAzH

Textbook publishers explore direct-to-student marketing and sales | In

Textbook publishers explore direct-to-student marketing and sales

insidehighered.com

September 9, 2015

Don’t be surprised if major publishers show up on campus this fall. In an effort to increase awareness — and sales — of digital course materials, publishers are pitching and selling their products directly to students.

The ongoing transition from print to digital in the textbook world is providing publishers an opportunity to learn more about students as consumers and, over time, gain greater control of how course materials are sold, analysts say. Several of the major textbook publishers, Cengage Learning and McGraw-Hill Education among them, have already begun that process by expanding the scope of their marketing.

In the golden era of the print textbook, publishers relied on a business-to-business marketing model. They targeted faculty members, who then assigned the books to students.

“Those days have changed,” said Dawn Keller, senior vice president of consumer and digital marketing at Cengage. The publisher created the position about eight months ago. Keller said the company recognized it needed to expand its marketing efforts to include its end users — students.

“We have to develop relationships and engage them and understand them as consumers as much as we engage with faculty,” Keller said. “It’s not an ‘or’ strategy. It’s an ‘and’ strategy.”

 

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Don Gorges

__Same predictable puff pieces each September – Let me know if you see an unbiased perspective from a Journalist that interviews Educational Publishers about their creative work, and analyzes the Publishers AR’s __ https://lnkd.in/efpHdhe

Fighting Big Textbook: How students are trying to save money as prices

Fighting Big Textbook: How students are trying to save money as prices

nationalpost.com

“When people say, ‘Oh look, textbook prices are going up seven or eight per cent and that’s three times as high as the CPI (consumer price index), that’s true,” Koch said. “But it’s increasingly deceptive, because of the larger importance of the rental and used markets.”

16d



Don Gorges

__Conservatives announced “To provide further support to families through RESPs, a re-elected Harper Government will enhance the Canada Education Savings Grants – the matching contribution to Registered Education Savings Plans – for low- and middle-income families _ An additional $100 in matching federal grants per year compounded for 15 years at, for example, a real annual rate of return of 5 percent, amounts to more than $2,200” __ https://lnkd.in/eTxJrjB

__Brock University Campus Store website offers Students an Amazon.ca comparison pricing option by adding metadata-based external search capabilities _ https://lnkd.in/epqkMXx _ certainly a positive step, but much more could be done to optimize the shopping experience _ https://lnkd.in/eYbX6eu

Back to school 2015: How post-secondary students can fight 'grim reali

Back to school 2015: How post-secondary students can fight ‘grim reality’ of rising textbook costs

Brock University offering ‘dynamic pricing’ to match online charges for materials

cbc.ca

At Brock, that has meant turning to new computer technology to allow the Campus Store to offer “dynamic pricing” and be more competitive with online vendors such as Amazon. The store’s website will show students a range of prices, including for new and used, e-book and rental costs, along with Amazon’s charge.

17d



Don Gorges

__Michael Feldstein and Phil Hill articles contribute so much to understanding technology-driven design iterations and Professional Development process _ https://lnkd.in/eXdBEFz

In Defense of the Lecture –

mfeldstein.com
By Michael Feldstein __ Following the IHE piece on Essex County College’s struggles to get good outcomes from their personalized learning program in developmental math, and following my blog post on the topic, Phil and I had an interesting exchange about the topic in email with ECC’s Vice President for Planning, Research, and Assessment Doug Walercz. With his permission, I’d like to share some of his observations with you. One of the big takeaways from the conversation, for me, is that our cultural notion of the pedagogical work that happens in a good lecture is pretty impoverished relative to the reality. We don’t have a clear understanding of all the things that a good lecture accomplishes, and therefore we often lose valuable elements of student support when we try to replace it. This has pretty serious implications for MOOCs, flipped classrooms, personalized learning, and a wide array of pedagogical approaches that replace a traditional in-person lecture with something else.

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__I encourage taking a close look at BCcampus’ open textbook collection, despite questioning the validity of the savings claims made by Andrew Wilkinson – how do they compare with $125 textbooks?  https://news.gov.bc.ca/factsheets/back-to-school-for-bc-post-secondary-students  _ https://lnkd.in/eCfxrY7

2015-09-05 – Don Gorges Posts August 23 to September 5

2015-09-05 – Don Gorges Posts August 23 to September 5

dongorges.wordpress.com

Commenting on Topics with Connected Points of View


Don Gorges

Don Gorges

Visual Communications in Educational Resources, Design, Creative Services, Marketing

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