2015-12-09 – Don Gorges Posts November 24 to December 8

 

Don Gorges Open Design Pearl Algorithm API

 

Commenting on Topics with Connected Points of View


Don Gorges

Don Gorges

Visual Communications in Educational Resources,
Open Design, Creative Services, Marketing

 



 

 

__Paul Stacey on Open business models and the growth of the Commons.

Two converging forces.

Converging Forces

Converging Forces

edtechfrontier.com

Paul Stacey – The open business models work I wrote about in my previous Edtech Frontier post generated high interest. Turns out there are lots of people and businesses trying to figure out how to use Creative Commons to openly share while at the same time operating and sustaining a business.

Early work responding to that interest revolved around using the open business model canvas and questions as a tool for depicting and designing open business models. This helps establish a common framework for what a business model is and how to think about it. It also creates a means of dissecting and analyzing an existing business.

 


Don Gorges

__Ryan Merkley, CEO, Creative Commons “I am proud to share with you our 2015 State of the Commons report, our best effort to measure the immeasurable scope of the commons by looking at the CC licensed content, along with content marked as public domain, that comprise the slice of the commons powered by CC tools.” _ https://lnkd.in/eHNmFMZ

State of the Commons

State of the Commons

stateof.creativecommons.org

It’s been a remarkable year, most notably for the more than 1.1 billion works under one of the CC licenses, CC0, or the public domain mark.

 


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Ryerson University

Ryerson University’s Tri-Mentoring introduces outreach program for first-generation students.

http://www.ryerson.ca/news/news/General_Public/20151207-first-generation-project-makes-connection-with-community.html

1449261098837.png

__Research* indicates “First-generation students spend 10 % more, acquire 6% fewer textbooks, and end up paying 17% more per textbook than do non first-generation students.” Perhaps consider ways that Faculty & Administration can support and advise First Generation students in their decisions regarding ways to acquire recommended / required educational resources and course materials. *_ http://mfeldstein.com/data-to-back-up-concerns-of-textbook-expenditures-by-first-generation-students/

 


 

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__Grad student Atlas Wang has developed a platform called DeepFont for Adobe products, which can scan pictures and determine the fonts of text inside them. – “The software itself works using a new type of machine learning called deep learning, which aims to create algorithms that mimic the human brain by continuously learning, recognizing patterns, and improving their performance.”

YouTube  VIDEO DEMO

Designers have thousands of fonts to choose from. But what do you when you see the perfect font but don’t know its name? DeepFont is a smart font recognition system, give it a picture of the desired font, and it’ll help with font identification.

This is early technology and not built into any product yet but if you want to see this in Creative Cloud, let us know by sharing #DeepFont on your social channels.

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Adobe Intern Develops Font Recognition System

Adobe Intern Develops Font Recognition System

adobe.ly
DeepFont has been ECE Illinois grad student, Zhangyang “Atlas” Wang’s project since he worked an internship with Adobe Research in the summer of 2014.

Font recognition is a huge need for designers, who traditionally rely upon professionals who charge high rates and take an average of 45 minutes to an hour to reliably determine fonts.

“I’m happy to resolve a need that the design community has been feeling for so long,” Wang said. “There’s definitely a sense of accomplishment when people like what you’ve developed, that’s a great feeling.”

The software itself works using a new type of machine learning called deep learning, which aims to create algorithms that mimic the human brain by continuously learning, recognizing patterns, and improving their performance.

Wang and his team started by building a database of real-world images with text, and teaching their algorithm the basics of distinguishing fonts. They designed the algorithm to work from this training, feeding it new examples and allowing it to recognize patterns. It will continuously refine its recognition abilities.



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__Misinformation in the lead paragraph of this item by Ariel Diaz damages edSurge’s reputation and the credibility of its editorial guidelines and Ethics Statement – “Our reputation for accurate, trustworthy coverage is our greatest asset. We believe our first and foremost responsibility is to our readers.” __ https://lnkd.in/eRDCBgc

Facing the Facts: Four Common Objections to Digital Textbooks (EdSurge News)

Facing the Facts: Four Common Objections to Digital Textbooks (EdSurge News)

edsurge.com   By Ariel Diaz Dec 5, 2015

The debate as to whether digital textbooks can stack up to traditional print textbooks rages on, intensified by seemingly incessant research and data exposing the outrageous costs of traditional print textbooks. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, college textbook prices have risen a shocking 1,041 percent since 1977—outpacing inflation by more than three times.

Don Gorges

__Many will recall Phil Hill’s recent article [http://mfeldstein.com/bad-data-can-lead-to-bad-policy-college-students-dont-spend-1200-on-textbooks/] on how bad data (such as this factoid) can influence public perceptions which can lead to bad policy decisions. If this claim were true, textbooks which are currently sold in campus bookstores for $100 would have sold for $8.76 in 1977 (per online percentage calculator) _ http://www.percentagecalculator.net/ _

 


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Computers Learn How to Paint Whatever You Tell Them To

Computers Learn How to Paint Whatever You Tell Them To

bloomberg.com
Advancements in artificial intelligence give machines an imagination and produce some strange imagery.

Researchers at the University of Toronto have devised a system that allows a user to input keywords—say, “toilet in a field,” or whatever other odd scenario one might think up—and get original, computer-drawn images.

 Similar projects are under way in AI labs across Silicon Valley. The latest breakthrough is an extension of past research by tech companies, such as Microsoft and Baidu, on describing the contents of an image. This is different from the hallucinatory Deep Dream generator that came out of a Google research project this year. While that effort enabled computers to draw little details onto images, displaying a spooky bias toward dog faces and eyeballs, it was unable to compose large, coherent pictures.

__Machine Learning and the Market for Intelligence – A Rotman School of Management Conference _ https://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/ProfessionalDevelopment/Events/UpcomingEvents/20151215MachineLearning.aspx

 


 

Don Gorges

__David Wiley “As I have reflected on the [#OpenEd15] post-conference conversation, and these larger questions about goals and purpose, I’ve decided to share some of my current best answers to these questions.” __ https://lnkd.in/ecQ3yas

Reflections on Open Education and the Path Forward

Reflections on Open Education and the Path Forward

opencontent.org

There’s been a lot of discussion about open textbooks, efficacy research, and student cost savings in the wake of this year’s #OpenEd15. The general theme of the conversation has been a concern that a focus on open textbooks confuses the means of open education with the end of open education. I’m compiling a Storify of examples of this really engaging writing – you should definitely take the time to read through it. I’m not responding directly to many of the points made in those posts here, but will in a later follow-up posts.

The overall criticism about ends / means confusion may or may not be true – it depends entirely on what you think the end or goal of open education should be. This is a conversation we almost never have in the field of open education. What is our long-term goal? What are we actually trying to accomplish? What kind of change are we trying to create in the world? The recently published OER strategy document, as informative as it is, reads more like a list of issues and opportunities than what Michael Feldstein describes as “rungs on a ladder of ambition.” Answering these questions leads to additional, more proximate concerns, like what specific steps do we need to take to get from here to there? In his #OpenEd15 keynote, Michael pushed our thinking with some additional questions, like “Who are we willing to let win?”



 

Don Gorges

__This is the first article in Audrey Watters series The Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2015 “this review tends to be very US-centric. I apologize. Too often, the rest of the world’s education systems are ignored by American writers like myself…” __ https://lnkd.in/ej5BaEm

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2015: The Politics of Education Technology

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2015: The Politics of Education Technology

hackeducation.com

One of the challenges of identifying the “Top Ed-Tech Trends” is that most of these developments are deeply interconnected. It’s hard to separate “The Politics of Education Technology” from “The Business of Education Technology.” It’s hard to separate the push for more standardized testing and more computers for students to use for standardized testing from either of these. It’s hard to separate concerns about testing from concerns about data and privacy. And so on.

It’s hard too, despite the title of this article, to solely talk about the politics of education technology. How does one distinguish such a thing from the politics of education or the politics of technology? To ignore these – something that happens too often – is to pretend that ed-tech is politics-free, that it is value-neutral.

 


 

Don Gorges

__It’s a ‘myth’ that Contact North articles need not include author’s name or the date written to add context and relevance to opinions / perspectives __ https://lnkd.in/eS-GYtU

Some Myths about Open Educational Resources

teachonline.ca

Open educational resources (OER) are playing a growing role in teaching and learning.

A 2014 US study shows the majority of faculty members in colleges and universities use such resources to supplement their teaching – videos from You Tube or iTunes University, materials from a massive open online course (MOOC), OERu and OER Commons, a science simulation they found online – and some even teach from OER courses, such as those from MIT or the United Kingdom Open University. OERs are now part of the fabric of the higher education system and will grow over the next several years.

But what is the other side of the OER story? Are there some myths and legends that need to be exposed. Following a dialogue with practitioners, we identified five myths and legends.

 


 

Don Gorges

__The Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges “Information technology in higher education has reached what IT leaders term an “inflection point”—the point at which the trends that have dominated discussions among leading strategists and that have motivated “early adopters” of various technologies are now cascading into the mainstream of institutions.” __ https://lnkd.in/eTGW2KU

What Boards Need to Know about Technology in 2015

What Boards Need to Know about Technology in 2015

agb.org
Change has always characterized information technology, but today change is occurring on many fronts at the same time, and the pace of change seems to be increasing. Colleges and universities are confronting opportunities and imperatives that are dependent on and enhanced by technology, including developing new revenue and business models, increasing innovation and efficiency, managing institutional risk, improving student success, and applying analytics (based on patterns found in large databases) to inform strategy and improve decision making.

TakeawaysFaculty and students are driving many of the demands for changes and upgrades to institutions’ information-technology systems, since they have diverse needs and high expectations for IT as their experience with technology increases.

Institutions need to develop funding models for IT that can sustain core services but also support innovation and allow the institution to grow in some areas as its mission evolves.

Institutions should establish a process for identifying, assessing, and documenting risks to support wise decision making about what risks to avoid, what risks to accept, and what risks can be mitigated through various actions.

 


 

Don Gorges

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2015

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2015

hackeducation.com
It’s time once again for my annual review of the year in ed-tech. This is the sixth year I’ve done so.  But looking back on the last five years of my “Top Ed-Tech Trends,” it does seem as though very little has changed. (Indeed, this series is beginning to feel like the Horizon Report, except instead of predicting what’s “on the horizon,” I’m always observing “the history of the future” of education by looking at the recent past.
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation supports the B.C. Open Textbook Project

 

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation supports the B.C. Open Textbook Project

bccampus.ca

BCcampus is the proud recipient of a grant from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in the amount of $525, 000 USD over three years to support the Open Textbook Project in British Columbia.

 


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Clint Lalonde

A collection of post #opened15 blog posts

clintlalonde.net

So much great and thoughtful commentary from the OpenEd community in the wake of #OpenEd15. David Wiley has been capturing blog posts via Storify. If there is a post missing from this list that you think should be included, please let us know and we’ll get the posts included so we have a complete archive.

7d


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Phil Hill

Is Open Education a Movement?

Is Open Education a Movement?

mfeldstein.com By Michael Feldstein

Phil and I had a wonderful time co-keynoting the OpenEd 2015 conference. It was a hoot.There have also been some other interesting virtual conversations growing around the conference, first over Twitter and now in the blogosphere. Some of the ones worth reading that I have seen so far include those from Maha Bali, Clint Lalonde (parts one and two), Robert Farrow (who also captures some of the tweets), and Robin DeRosa.

Phil and I approached our keynote as analysts because we figured that’s probably the main value that we have to offer. We wouldn’t presume to tell people what open education “should” be about, but given any particular “should,” we’re pretty good at thinking through how to achieve it. For my part of the talk I used the analogy of building the climate action movement because the open education community often speaks of itself in the language of a movement and because I happen to have some experience in that area. And if you read some of the posts I mentioned above, you will indeed see varying degrees of movement language.

But there is an underlying question that really should be addressed explicitly: To what extent is it accurate or useful to think of open education as a movement?

 


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Carine Kinch

Vice President Outreach

Friends: I will be leaving JUMP Math in the new year to pursue some personal goals and I am helping to recruit for my replacement. If you know of someone who would be qualified and interested in joining this amazing team, please let me know. This is a tremendous opportunity for an energetic, results-oriented leader to support the growth of a not-for-profit social enterprise committed to maximizing educational opportunities for children.

 


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Cengage Learning

“The MindTap platform was developed based on student feedback and adapts to the way students learn. This study underscores our efforts and we commend the Texas Tech chemistry students on their hard work,” said Jim Donohue, Chief Product Officer.

Study: Chemistry students boost grades with digital solution – eCampus News

ecampusnews.com

Texas Tech professor’s study finds participating students using MindTap’s digital learning solution outperformed peers

chemistry-studentsTexas Tech Chemistry students using Cengage Learning’s MindTap digital learning solution received significantly better outcomes than those using comparable products, according to results from a study of nearly 1,800 chemistry students.

The study, conducted by Professor Gregory Gellene, compared the course grades and the success rates of students using MindTap General Chemistry with those using alternative e-learning platforms.

 


Don Gorges

__”There’s nothing more expensive than cheap design” – a lesson taken from notes on a learning curve to becoming a “Great Client” _ www linkedin com/pulse/theres-nothing-more-expensive-than-cheap-design-mark-shayler

 


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__Dr. Robert Farrow, Open University, OpenEd15 _ “is the OER movement about freedom, or about things being ‘free’?’ _ Robert refers to the ‘community’ leadership call to action in the Foundations for OER Strategy doc at the end of conference _ https://lnkd.in/eS4XSbV __ https://lnkd.in/e9EKQn6

Colonisers and edupunks (&c.): two cultures in OER?

Colonisers and edupunks (&c.): two cultures in OER?

philosopher1978.wordpress.com

I’ve started writing this post at the Open Education 2015 conference at the Fairmont Hotel in Vancouver because I want to try and capture some thoughts about the evolution of this movement and community.  But I’m finishing it from home after a little bit of time to digest and also after attending OpenUpTRU in Kamloops earlier in the week.

Don Gorges

__related video converstion: GO-GN #opened15 debrief _ Streamed live on Nov 26, 2015 _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5o5PJJ16NQ&feature=youtu.be _

__Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection will amaze with 115,580 Resources [search-metadata work in progress] __ https://lnkd.in/ecEySyn

Launching the World's Largest OER Collection...Yeah, That Just Happened.

Launching the World’s Largest OER Collection…Yeah, That Just Happened.

Brian Ausland on LinkedIn

Over 1.35 million objects from the Smithsonian’s 19 museums, 9 major research centers, and the national zoo have been released and combined with custom tools to support rich, digital learning around the globe.

__As we shift from print to digital educational tools “We are on the verge of a tide of smarter innovation that, if allowed to spread, will turbocharge the learning experience for students. Here are four areas worth watching:” _ Amar Kumar, SVP of Efficacy & Research at Pearson. __ https://lnkd.in/eBeMJ5Y

How Education Will Be Smarter, Less Intrusive, And Able To Respond To How You Feel

How Education Will Be Smarter, Less Intrusive, And Able To Respond To How You Feel

social.techcrunch.com

Impatience characterizes the technology sector’s approach to education. Disruption is taking place in all other sectors of society — so, why not education? I know too well, whether at Pearson or in the classroom, the challenges and frustration of developing and using digital tools that improve outcomes for students.

But I’m optimistic. We are on the verge of a tide of smarter innovation that, if allowed to spread, will turbocharge the learning experience for students. Here are four areas worth watching:

__Educators as ‘Creators’ and Lumen Learning as ‘Platforms’ makes sense used as the definitions throughout _ “The rest of this article will explore four ways that creators and platforms can expand the value proposition underlying what they do.” www medium com/made-with-creative-commons/open-for-business-2d4579c7664d __ https://lnkd.in/egyuYyD

Open for Business — Made with Creative Commons

Open for Business — Made with Creative Commons

medium.com
A look at how platforms and creators build successful endeavors around open digital content.
One thing is clear: when it comes to making money around open digital content, there are no magic beans. In fact, you only have to Google “ad-blocking controversy” to know there are no magic beans for content creators of any type in the digital age. But as we explore the various ways people are building successful endeavors around Creative Commons licensing, we are quickly finding there are some building blocks that nearly everyone who wants to build upon open should consider. Interestingly, those fundamentals often apply to both the creators who make and publish their own work and the platforms who aggregate and publish the work of others. This article will take a deep dive into the common threads that bind these two very different categories of open business models.
 


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Tony Bates

Hill, P. (2015) Bad Data Can Lead To Bad Policy: College students don’t spend $1,200+ on textbooks, e-Literate, November 8 Caulfield, M. (2015) Asking What Students Spend on Textbooks Is the Wrong Question, Hapgood, November 9 Just wanted to draw your attention to two really interesting and useful blog posts about the cost of textbooks. First thanks […]

What students spend on textbooks and how it affects open textbooks

What students spend on textbooks and how it affects open textbooks

tonybates.ca

Just wanted to draw your attention to two really interesting and useful blog posts about the cost of textbooks.

First thanks to Phil Hill for correcting what I and many other have been saying: that students are spending more than $1,000 a year on textbooks. It turns out that what students are actually spending is around $530 – $640 (all figures in this post are in U.S. dollars and refer to U.S. post-secondary education.) Furthermore, student spending on textbooks has actually declined (slightly) over the last few years (probably as a result of increasing tuition fees – something has to give).

Mike Caulfield however points out that the actual cost of recommended textbooks is over $1,000 a year (or more accurately, between $968 and $1221, depending on the mix of rental and newly purchased books), and that this is the figure that counts, because if students are spending less, then they are putting their studies at risk by not using recommended texts.



Don Gorges

__Two ceramics by Emily Carr were also sold, as well as her painting Forest Interior [https://lnkd.in/e95-sr8], which went for $200,000. __ https://lnkd.in/eDEmC94

Lawren Harris, Tom Thomson and Alex Colville paintings smash records at auction

Lawren Harris, Tom Thomson and Alex Colville paintings smash records at auction

cbc.ca
Paintings by famous Canadian artists — including Lawren Harris and Tom Thomson — garnered record prices on Thursday night at the Heffel Fine Art Auction at the Park Hyatt Hotel in Toronto.

__”And so here’s the question I want to ask: If OER textbooks are where the OpenEd community wants to make this the first point of attack, what’s next? Let’s assume a world where all textbooks are free. Did we win? Or did we just make the act of passively interacting with information less expensive? Is that what we meant?” __ https://lnkd.in/eAF5Jbe

Is That What We Meant?

Is That What We Meant?

adamcroom.com
Adam Croom – Director of Digital Learning _ I’m back in the heartland after a wonderful past few days in Vancouver for OpenEd. On Wednesday, I wrote a post on my Known blog that gave out APIs that I had built which contained every abstract for OpenEd since 2012. I originally built these because I was curious about the acronym “OER.” When did we go from “Open Education Resources” to “OER” and what is the acronym usually associated with? As a lot of my projects, I abandoned it before I made a ton of headway, but I encourage you to download the files and play with the data to do so (or use it, of course, however you would like).



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__although I’m a little surprised. . . Stephen Downes says “This makes me happy [-] because it is so inclusive, and respectful of diverse perspectives and approaches to open educational resources, while at the same time underlining the value the community as a whole sees in OERs, I think it’s a particularly strong work, and one I have no difficulty endorsing. __ https://lnkd.in/eVDMKzs

Foundations for OER Strategy Development

Foundations for OER Strategy Development

downes.ca
[Stephen Downes] I participated in a couple of the conferences where this document was discussed and thoroughly harangued the drafting committee through several online versions, and while they’ve blended seamlessly with the rest of the document I can see the evidence that the perspectives I advanced were listened to and respected. This makes me happy. Not just because I like to be listened to and respected (though I do, who doesn’t?) but because it resulted in a stronger and much more inclusive document. And because it is so inclusive, and respectful of diverse perspectives and approaches to open educational resources, while at the same time underlining the value the community as a whole sees in OERs, I think it’s a particularly strong work, and one I have no difficulty endorsing.
  1. __”thoroughly harangued” might sound like the comments made 22:18 17 Jul by Stephen Downes _ “You guys are like the European Commission, a bunch of unelected bodies who appoint themselves and then declare a “consensus” where there obviously isn’t one.” __ 15:04 18 Jun Stephen Downes “p.s. this phrase (ideally CC BY by default) by itself would cause me to withdraw any support for this document.” __ worth having a reading searchable copy Comments History – It’s interesting to see issues evolved and resolved through the Drafts

 



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Commenting on Topics with Connected Points of View


Don Gorges

Don Gorges

Visual Communications in Educational Resources,
Open Design, Creative Services, Marketing



 

 

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