2016-04-24 – Don Gorges Posts April 4 to April 24

 

Don Gorges Open Design Pearl Algorithm API

 

Commenting on Topics with Connected Points of View


Don Gorges

Don Gorges

Visual Communications in Educational Resources,
Open Design, Creative Services, Marketing

 

 



 

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Canadian Tire CTO Eugene Roman outlines $400 million drive to shift gears as a ‘clicks-and-bricks’ retailer

Canadian Tire CTO Eugene Roman outlines $400 million drive to shift gears as a ‘clicks-and-bricks’ retailer

itworldcanada.com  ITWorldCanada.com staff – April 22, 2016

his is not your grandfather’s Canadian Tire.

An augmented reality catalogue. Virtual reality store displays. A gaming lab. And a fitness obsessed tech genius based in the Ukraine.

They’re all part of a push to transform the 94-year-old seller of hockey sticks, patio sets and – yes – tires from a bricks-and-mortar historical icon into a global retail innovator.

In a presentation at the CIO Peer Forum in Toronto on Thursday, chief technology officer Eugene Roman made it clear he’s not just playing catch up; he wants to make Canadian Tire a digital leader the rest of the pack will have to keep up with.

canadian-tire-app
Using the Canadian Tire app, customers can get clickable details or video links by hovering their mobile device over certain products in the Wow Guide catalogue. (Photo: Canadian Tire)
 


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__ Paul Stacey research is focused on Creative Commons license-based open business models. Putting Technology to use and sharing X with a community is framed as “a bigger transformation taking place in society and the economy”, although, on a GOOD /\ BAD scale, there is a tipping point _ “And I should be clear upfront I’m not talking about Uber and AirBnB who in my view co-opted the sharing economy term but in fact are examples of traditional approaches that try to maximize extraction value for themselves.” __

A Larger Context & Bigger Transformation

A Larger Context & Bigger Transformation

edtechfrontier.com

Creative Commons based open business models are part of something larger, a bigger transformation taking place in society and the economy.

This really struck home for me when, in response to our open call for nominations on who we should interview for our book on Creative Commons based open business models, we received tons of suggestions — many of which didn’t use Creative Commons at all.

In checking out all the suggestions we receive it quickly became apparent that “open business models” is a large context within which Creative Commons based open business models are a subset. While all of our interviews have focused on organizations and businesses that use Creative Commons I‘ve really enjoyed getting a deeper sense of this larger context. Understanding the big picture within which Creative Commons based open business models sit is helping me see the bigger transformation unfolding.

 


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Cara Yarzab

The industry I started in has contracted significantly. This article describes one piece of the story.

Kate Taylor: Kids will suffer if Canada’s copyright legislation doesn’t change

Kate Taylor: Kids will suffer if Canada’s copyright legislation doesn’t change

theglobeandmail.com
Balancing users’ rights with those of creators is always a tricky business and when the previous Conservative government updated the copyright law in 2012, publishers and writers warned that it had made far too large and vague an exemption for educational purposes, considering that digital copying in universities and photocopying in schools is standard practice and was licensed to the education sector by publishers. At the time, provincial education ministries promised they would only copy what was fair, but defining fair has proved highly contentious.
The cash-strapped school system may have discovered a great way to save a few dollars per student but, unless the federal government plugs the loophole, education will pay in the end. Teachers will gradually discover that high-quality classroom material about Canadian history, geography and politics specifically tailored to their province’s curriculum simply isn’t available either in print or online because the publishers and writers who once created it have left the business.
  1. I’m not sure it’s a balanced view. The book industry was uberized, disrupted, yes. There are plenty of resources free out there, sure. We still need good content. There is value in curated content. There is also value in sharing contributions, co-creating, and collaborating. We might still be looking for the Uber of education.

__I agree with both comments, Kate Taylor’s summary is good and fair, yet, the reader could benefit from a broader understanding of the situation. Consider these 2 differing points of view _ “Economic Impacts of the Canadian Educational Sector’s Fair Dealing Guidelines”, PwC, Access Copyright _ http://www.accesscopyright.ca/media/94983/access_copyright_report.pdf _ AND _ “Copyright Board Ruling Strikes Fair Balance in Heated Education Fight” – Michael Geist _ http://www.michaelgeist.ca/2016/03/copyright-board-ruling-strike-fair-balance-in-heated-education-fight/ _

 


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Stephen Solomon

Interesting article, but a bit one-sided considering no mention of OER publishers like panOpen and Boundless Learning https://lnkd.in/bv2KdmM

Creative Commons logo

OER in Higher Ed: ‘Huge Awareness-Raising Effort Needed’ — Campus Technology

campustechnology.com  By David Raths 04/21/16

Open textbook projects are gaining momentum, says Creative Commons’ Cable Green, but there is still work to be done.

When it comes to open educational resources (OER) adoption, is the glass half empty or half full? On the one hand, more than 1 billion works have been licensed using Creative Commons since the organization was founded 15 years ago, and in 2015 alone Creative Commons-licensed works were viewed online 136 billion times. Yet awareness of OER in higher education remains low.  Approximately 75 percent of faculty respondents to a 2014 Babson Survey Research Group study didn’t know about or couldn’t accurately define OER or why it is important.

Changing that situation is the mission of Cable Green, director of open education at Creative Commons and a leading advocate for open policies that ensure publicly funded education materials are freely and openly available to the public. “We still have a huge awareness-raising effort that needs to be done,” said Green. “We all need to teach other people about what this is and why it is important.”

 

  1. Thanks, Stephen Solomon, I thought so too(!)

__It crossed my mind this ‘article’ might be described as either faux-journalism or Creative Commons PR, which Cable may have dictated himself _ there is a similarity of purpose in another example/article with David Raths’ byline _http://www.healthcare-informatics.com/blogs/david-raths/data-governance-field-study _ About the Author: David Raths is a Philadelphia-based freelance writer focused on information technology. He writes regularly for several IT publications, including Healthcare Informatics and Government Technology.

 


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Deep and Lovely – by Mike Caulfield _ “It feels a bit silly sharing reflections on Prince when so many people have done it better. I’m particularly moved by the glimpses we have gotten over the last day of Prince, the person, a guy who loved to laugh and saw his mission in life as helping others. I’ve loved the meditations on both his visual style and his musical style, the thoughts on his approach to technology, the sharing his epic guitar solos, and the greatest halftime show in the history of football.” _ https //hapgood us/2016/04/22/deep-and-lovely/

  1. __Image caption: Oscar-winning rock singer Prince gives his final performance in Miami’s Orange Bowl, Easter Sunday, April 8, 1985, before a crowd of an estimated 55,000 fans. (Phil Sandlin/AP) via _ http://artery.wbur.org/2016/04/22/prince-rogers-nelson __ Article: Deep and Lovely | Hapgood _ https://hapgood.us/2016/04/22/deep-and-lovely/


In 1993, Prince frustrated contract lawyers and computer users everywhere when he changed his name to glyph known as “The Love Symbol.” Though he never said so explicitly, it’s generally understood that the name change was attempt to stick it to his record label, Warner Bros., which now had to deal with a top-tier artist with a new, unpronounceable, untypeable name. But it wasn’t just Warner Bros. that had a problem: The Love Symbol proved frustrating for people who wanted to both speak and write about Prince. Writers, editors, and layout designers at magazines and newspapers wouldn’t be able to type the actual name of the Artist Formerly Known As Prince. So Prince did the only thing you could do in that situation: He had a custom-designed font distributed to news outlets on a floppy disk.



 

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McGraw-Hill Education

We’re leading advocates of efforts to establish and maintain unified standards for the rapidly growing ed-tech industry: https://lnkd.in/bYb7KgK Stephen Laster explains how students & teachers benefit from industry-wide collaboration with the IMS Global Learning Consortium.

IMS Global Achieves Record Levels of Revenue and Member Growth - Press Release Rocket

IMS Global Achieves Record Levels of Revenue and Member Growth – Press Release Rocket

pressreleaserocket.net
2015 Annual Report Highlights Unprecedented Progress to Create an Interoperable Ecosystem to Enable Better Learning & Educational Experiences

Lake Mary, FL (PRWEB) April 20, 2016

IMS Global Learning Consortium (IMS Global), the world leader in EdTech interoperability and impact, has released their 2015 Annual Report. As part of its commitment to openness and transparency to members and stakeholders worldwide, the annual report is available to the public online at https://www.imsglobal.org/sites/default/files/2015annualReport.pdf.

“We believe that the tremendous growth achieved in 2015 is a clear indicator of the compelling value proposition of IMS Global to enable better educational experiences and outcomes worldwide,” said Rob Abel, Ed.D, Chief Executive Officer, IMS Global. “Interoperability is the lynchpin to enabling better digital teaching and learning experiences, and leading institutions, governments, and suppliers are finding that aggressive adoption of IMS interoperability standards provides a better path to supporting the future of education.”


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__Watch Bill Gates Keynote Presentation on the closing day of the ASU+GSV Summit around the questions: Who are “the new majority” of students in American education? How do we best serve them?

Bill Gates’ 3 Pronged Approach to Serving ‘The New Majority’ of American Students (EdSurge News)

Bill Gates’ 3 Pronged Approach to Serving ‘The New Majority’ of American Students (EdSurge News)

edsurge.com
Keynote speeches tend to be more inspirational than informational. But when you’re Bill Gates, and your foundation has poured billions of dollars in American education, these talks can offer a glimpse into the current and future priorities where his money may be headed.
 


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__Jim Groom Keynote: #OER16 – Abstract: What if we worked towards a collaborative infrastructure for open educational resources that was always framed and scaled at the level of the individual, not unlike the web. With the shift in web infrastructure to the cloud, and the advent of APIs and containers, we may be entering a moment wherein the open culture of networks, rather than pre-defined educational content, is representative of the future of OER culture. _


OER16 Jim Groom Can we imagine tech Infrastructure as an OER

Jim Groom: Can we imagine tech Infrastructure as an OER? Or, Clouds, Containers, and APIs, Oh My!

Streamed live on Apr 20, 2016

We often frame OERs, open, shareable educational resources, in relationship to content, but rarely in relationship to shared technical infrastructure. How would our conception of OERs expand if we could easily and efficiently create and share applications across institutions? What if we focused more on small, focused, re-usable software as reflective of specific cultures rather than large, institutional repositories as monolithic solutions? What if we worked towards a collaborative infrastructure for open educational resources that was always framed and scaled at the level of the individual, not unlike the web. With the shift in web infrastructure to the cloud, and the advent of APIs and containers, we may be entering a moment wherein the open culture of networks, rather than pre-defined educational content, is representative of the future of OER culture. How might the agile contours of a burgeoning network of distributed and collaborative edtech be the key to sustainable future for open educational resources? Well, come to this talk and find out….maybe.

 


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Karl Isaac

“Before modern companies like Apple and Airbnb preached the virtues of a design-led business, Brooklyn Brewery had one of the most respected designers as part owner.”

The True Story Of Milton Glaser's Best Client

The True Story Of Milton Glaser’s Best Client

fastcodesign.com

Brooklyn Brewery and Milton Glaser have been collaborating for longer than many brands have been around—let alone have worked with a single agency—is a rarity these days. We spoke to Glaser and Hindy at Glaser’s Manhattan studio about the beer and branding business, how their partnership began, how it’s grown and evolved over the years, and the value of collaborating with a friend.

Milton Glaser
 


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BCcampus

In anticipation and celebration of Earth Day, we explore the sustainability of open educational resources (OER).

Creating sustainable resources through open textbooks

Creating sustainable resources through open textbooks

open.bccampus.ca
While we continue to explore potential sources of sustainable funding for the B.C. Open Textbook Project, we also need to define the scope of sustainability.
  1. Will the resources remain available and accessible?
  2. Who will update the resources and how will that be done?
  3. Who will advocate and promote open textbooks?
  4. Who will support faculty who wish to adopt open textbooks?
  5. Who will support faculty who wish to adapt or modify an open textbook?
 


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__”it is recommended that work-integrated learning programmes be integrated deliberately within the curriculum of the academic programme(s). As well, postsecondary institutions should be working in partnership with workplaces, because both organizations possess domain-specific knowledge and expertise that significantly contribute to effective work-integrated learning experiences.” __

A Practical Guide for Work-integrated Learning HEQCO

A Practical Guide for Work-integrated Learning: Structured Work Experiences Offered through Colleges and Universities

heqco.ca

New guide helps practitioners enhance the quality of work-integrated learning opportunitiesWork-integrated learning (WIL) is becoming increasingly popular in higher education; almost half of Ontario’s postsecondary education students will take part in some form of co-op, placement or internship by the time they graduate. A new guide from the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) and Education at Work Ontario (EWO) is a resource for faculty, staff, academic leaders and educational developers to improve the quality of WIL programs. Effective, work-integrated learning opportunities enhance student learning and develop work-ready skills outside of the classroom.

A Practical Guide for Work-integrated Learning: Effective Practices to Enhance the Educational Quality of Structured Work Experiences Offered through Colleges and Universities focuses on structured work-integrated learning experiences such as internships, placements, co-ops, field experiences, professional practice and clinical practicums. The comprehensive guide is divided into seven chapters with an introduction to experiential learning theory, followed by background information and suggestions on improving the quality of WIL programs, program evaluation and recommendations for broader curricular integration developing meaningful partnerships with industry, government and community organizations.

 


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Pop Quiz

Pop Quiz

Which CEO has recently said or done all of the following:

  • Suggested to an audience of VCs and ed tech entrepreneurs at the GSV conference that the importance of big data in education has been overstated
  • Told that same audience that the biggest gains from adaptive learning come when it is wrapped in good pedagogy delivered by good teachers
  • Asked former CIOs from Harvard and MIT, both of whom are senior company employees, to develop collaborations with the academic learning science community
  • Accurately described Benjamin Bloom’s two-sigma research, with special attention to the implications for the bottom half of the bell curve
  • When asked a question by an audience member about an IMS technical interoperability standard in development, correctly described both the goals of the standard and its value to educators in plain English

Answer: David Levin of McGraw Hill.

Yes yes, those are just words. But I have gotten a good look at some of what their ed tech product and data science groups have been up to lately, and I have spoken to Levin at length on a few occasions (and grilled him at length on two of them).

My advice: Pay attention to this company. They are not screwing around.

 


Don Gorges commented on this

__Ryan Merkley is telling you “/stealing-publicly-funded-research-isnt-stealing/”, but, in fact, it is. It is good advice to fact-check opinions-articles you see with this byline __ See comments section for informative perspectives

You Pay to Read Research You Fund. That’s Ludicrous

You Pay to Read Research You Fund. That’s Ludicrous

 

Comments to this op-ed are generally informative, – – for example, says:

“Publishers acquire this research free of charge, and retain the copyrights, even though the public funded the work.” The public funds the research. Publishers pay for the version of record and all costs associated with it (peer review, copy editing, typesetting, distribution, discovery, digital archiving, etc.). Authors are also allowed to freely disseminate their manuscripts. Yes, you read that correctly — authors are legally allowed to distribute their manuscript. Copyright only applies to the final version that has been curated, edited, and hosted by publishers.

“In exchange, publishers claim the authors’ copyrights, and collect significant profit margins, sometimes as much as 30 percent.” Groups all for-profit publishers with Elseiver and ignores all non-profit publishers.

For anyone unfamiliar with the scholarly publishing landscape, please don’t fall victim to this reductionist drivel. It’s a narrative that contains more tribalism than accuracy. Look into the issue yourself. Pieces like this are a dime a dozen; they use Elsevier to represent an entire industry and then inject a naive sense of righteousness into a call to action. The fact is, it’s not as simple as uploading a PDF to a $10/month GoDaddy server. PLOS One, the flagship Open Access journal, charges $1,500 for each article (unless you qualify for financial support). Why? Because publishing costs are a real thing, and open access simply hands the bill to someone else.

Guest Post: Kent Anderson UPDATED — 96 Things Publishers Do (2016 Edition)

tl;dr: https://scholarlykitchen.sspne…

 


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__[While these 3 technologies] “will peak at different times over the course of decades, we’re experiencing all three of them in some capacity already. Each is powerful in its own right, but their convergence will be even more so. Kurzweil wrote about these ideas in The Singularity Is Near over a decade ago. [-] The more we anticipate and debate these three powerful technological revolutions, the better we can guide their development toward outcomes that do more good than harm.” __ https://lnkd.in/echQSmP

Ray Kurzweil Predicts Three Technologies Will Define Our Future

Ray Kurzweil Predicts Three Technologies Will Define Our Future

singularityhub.com

Over the last several decades, the digital revolution has changed nearly every aspect of our lives.

The pace of progress in computers has been accelerating, and today, computers and networks are in nearly every industry and home across the world.

Many observers first noticed this acceleration with the advent of modern microchips, but as Ray Kurzweil wrote in his book The Singularity Is Near, we can find a number of eerily similar trends in other areas too.

According to Kurzweil’s law of accelerating returns, technological progress is moving ahead at an exponential rate, especially in information technologies.

This means today’s best tools will help us build even better tools tomorrow, fueling this acceleration.



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__Thanks to Alan Levine for setting-up this discussion “Streamed live [earlier today] to converse with two of the keynote speakers from OER16 [in Scotland] and hear more about the conference” __

Alan Levine connecting OER16 With Catherine Cronin and Jim Groom

Virtually Connecting: OER16 With Catherine Cronin and Jim Groom

Alan Levine and a small group of others you likely know join for an online conversion with two of the keynote speakers from OER16 and hear more about the conference.

I’d suggest jumping-in at around 4:45 for a discussion about a question posed by Catherine in her keynote –  “what do we mean by Open?”

Jim Groom comments, around  7: 20>,  resonate with me where, generally speaking, Jim is pushing back and struggling with the position in the US where OER is a ‘cost-saving’ commodity

Another segment was particularly interesting to me – at about 34:40 – 36:00 – when Susan Adams comments about OER culture and the concept of organizing/optimizing ones’ ‘life-bits’ – an individual’s artifacts of lifelong learning [thinking personal API]



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McGraw-Hill Education

ALEKS adaptive technology will soon personalize math learning for thousands of new college students as part of ASU’s MOOC-based Global Freshman Academy! https://lnkd.in/baNZBSy via Campus Technology

ASU's Global Freshman Academy Taps Adaptive Software for Math Students -- Campus Technology

ASU’s Global Freshman Academy Taps Adaptive Software for Math Students — Campus Technology

campustechnology.com

Arizona State University‘s online Global Freshman Academy (GFA) is rolling out adaptive software to help tens of thousands of students work through its College Algebra & Problem Solving course. The GFA program, delivered via massive open online course (MOOC) provider edX, will be the first to utilize McGraw-Hill Education‘s ALEKS adaptive learning product in a MOOC format.

ALEKS (Assessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces) uses artificial intelligence to personalize a student’s learning experience based on his or her unique strengths and weaknesses. Students receive real-time feedback to guide them toward mastery of each topic.
 


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Millennials Show Us What 'Old' Looks Like

Millennials Show Us What ‘Old’ Looks Like

YouTube

What age do you consider to be old? We posed that question to millennials and asked them to show us what “old” looks like. Then we introduced them to some real “old” people.

 


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__Guy Kawasaki’s Personal Marketing Audit – Links Audit & Quiz plus Link to initial Slide Presentation – ‘How to Perfect Your Personal Marketing’ – in comments below

  1. __Guy Kawasaki’s Personal Marketing Audit Slides _ https://www.hightail.com/download/ZWJWQndQcGtoMldGa2RVag _ QUIZ _ Bitly.com/personalmarketingaudit _ Slide Presentation ‘How to Perfect Your Personal Marketing’ _ http://www.slideshare.net/GuyKawasaki/how-to-perfect-your-personal-marketing-54642561 _

 


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Cara Yarzab

Curious about what is happening at TVO? A great article about our CEO Lisa de Wilde.

Steering a public broadcaster through turbulent times

Steering a public broadcaster through turbulent times

theglobeandmail.com
Lisa de Wilde, chief executive officer of TVO, on her plans for a public institution

One part of TVO’s growth plan, still in its infancy, involves exporting Ontario’s education curriculum. TVO runs the Independent Learning Centre – effectively the province’s largest high school, with nearly 20,000 students – offering credit courses to adult learners looking to further their education. “There’s nothing to stop us selling them outside the province, selling them around the globe,” she says, pointing to a recent deal struck with China’s Wuxi province.

TVO is also experimenting with gamified learning, which draws on aspects of video game design to get students interested. It has a pilot product focused on math, built for kindergarten students and called mPower, and hopes to roll out games for kids up to Grade 6 later this year.

“We do what we do here for the mandate, and then if we can repurpose content and sell it outside of Ontario, that’s the sort of silver bullet,” she says.

 



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BCcampus

Developing an open policy for higher education

Developing Open Policy for Higher Education - Creative Commons blog

Developing Open Policy for Higher Education – Creative Commons blog

blog.creativecommons.org
Institute for Open Leadership fellows take turns to write about their open policy projects.

In March we hosted the second Institute for Open Leadership, and in our summary of the event we mentioned that the Institute fellows would be taking turns to write about their open policy projects. First up is Amanda Coolidge, Senior Manager of Open Education at BCcampus.

  1. __Congratulations, Amanda. It would be ideal for all to have the opportunity to review wording of existing RFP-Contacts of completed educational resources projects, to have the opportunity to study and compare the current situation and consider the impact of proposed changes outlined _ For example, the details related to “editable Files” in RFP-contract specification is likely to be very important to grantees _ “Technical formats for revision and remixing: Completed OER materials must include the original, editable files for re-distribution”

I recent found that Amanda has blocked me from following her twitter feed and I am disappointed she is not open to everyone’s viewing, comments or questions.
 


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__Moleskine Smart Writing Set article and video

You can now sketch in a notebook and have it digitized instantly

You can now sketch in a notebook and have it digitized instantly

contemporist.com

Moleskine have just launched a new writing set that allows you to draw or take notes using a smart pen, in their specially designed notebook, that then works with an app to instantly digitize it for you.

The Smart Writing Set includes a notebook they call the Paper Tablet, the Pen+, and the Moleskine Notes App.
The Pen+ is a slim aluminum pen, but it has a hidden camera in it, that digitizes everything you draw or write.
The Moleskine Notes App, is basically where everything is stored, which can then be edited, shared, exported or searched.
Here’s the technical explanation from Moleskine. “The paper is made with Ncode technology patented by NeoLAB Convergence, a grid invisible to the naked eye is hidden in the paper and enables the pen, powered by Neo smartpen, to recognize where it is on the page and within the notebook.”
 


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__FAQ _ https://nbsa-aenb.ca/2016/04/14/students-applaud-historic-improvements-to-financial-aid/ _ about The Tuition Access Bursary [Student’s family income <$60k] “For example, if you are eligible to receive $2000 in federal grants, and the full cost of your tuition is $6200, the Government of New Brunswick will pay the difference between your federal grant and the cost of your tuition directly to your post-secondary institution.” __

Students Applaud Historic Improvements to Financial Aid

Students Applaud Historic Improvements to Financial Aid

nbsa-aenb.ca

Fredericton, NB – Post-secondary students in New Brunswick are applauding today’s unveiling of the Tuition Access Bursary, which will make university more accessible and affordable for many.

The new bursary will fill the gap between federal grants and the amount owing on tuition for every New Brunswick student with a gross household income of $60,000 or less attending one of the province’s post-secondary institutions – effectively making tuition free.

A reinvestment into financial aid was first announced in the 2016-17 provincial budget. Student groups including the New Brunswick Student Alliance have since been consulting with government on the bursary’s design.

“The financial barriers to post-secondary education are real, and in New Brunswick in particular, they are tremendous,” said Lindsay Handren, NBSA Executive Director.

“By directing resources to the students who need it most when they need it most, government is dramatically improving financial aid and increasing access. The Tuition Access Bursary is designed to help low- and middle-income New Brunswickers pursue the dream of a post-secondary education.”

 


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__Commentary by Stephen Downes– “Here is the point of the post in a nutshell: “If we agree that empowerment and engagement of educators and learners is an important goal, we need to implement active policies that build on and support the potential ensured by passive ones,” policies such as incentives and infrastructure (but let’s be honest: mostly incentives). And I have to ask, if we have to incent them to reuse, then we should examine what we’re doing.”

Active OER: Beyond open licensing policies

Active OER: Beyond open licensing policies

downes.ca

This is a guest blog post written by Alek Tarkowski, Director of Centrum Cyfrowe and co-founder of Creative Commons Poland. On April 14, 2016, 60 experts from 30 countries are meeting in Kraków, Poland for the first OER Policy Forum. The goal of the event is to build on the foundations for OER strategy development and define collective paths towards greater, active OER adoption.

[-]

Mapping paths toward open education

Reuse is not something that can only happen “in the wild” once the adequate conditions are created. In fact, such organic reuse is quite rare. Although we lack empirical data, I would assume that less than 5% of users is willing to modify content, remix it, create own versions and mash-ups.

If we agree that empowerment and engagement of educators and learners is an important goal, we need to implement active policies that build on and support the potential ensured by passive ones. These could include incentives for teachers to create, reuse and share OER, investing in repositories and other types of infrastructure for discovery and analytics of content, or paying attention to digital literacy of teachers and formulation of new pedagogies. Developing, testing and implementing such active policies in educational systems around the world has to compliment efforts to open resources.

Almost five years after the signing of the Paris OER Declaration and ten years after the foundational meeting in Cape Town, it is time to define new strategies. For the last few years, I have been advocating for the definition of such “paths to open education”. In response, I’ve often heard that education is too varied for such standard scenarios to be defined. But if we want policies that support active reuse of OERs, then we need to define such standard paths. It is clear to me that these would be useful for policymakers asking the same questions. And the answers to some of these questions might even be easier than focusing most of our efforts and outreach on open licensing.



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Chris Roy

The beauty of letter forms. I used to do this over, and over again in Design College.

Absolutely amazing free hand logos done by artist Seb Lester

AMAZING! Artist Seb Lester freehand famous logos

YouTube

Absolutely amazing free hand logos done by artist Seb Lester http://www.seblester.com/

 


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__New Open Education Search App by OpenEd.com and Microsoft _ via Jane Park – Creative Commons – _ The challenge for Creative Commons leadership is to get authors-creators to do additional work on the CC resources they had previously created – to add the necessary metadata and to ensure compliance with interoperability standards __

A new Open Education Search App is available as part of the U.S. Department of Education’s #GoOpen campaign, a commitment by 14 states and 40 districts to transition to the use of high-quality, openly-licensed educational resources in their schools. The search app pulls in data from the Learning Registry and works within any Learning Tools Interoperability (LTI) compliant Learning Management System. The Open Education Search App enables educators and other users within these districts to search for and assign OER directly within an LMS. Current search filters include subject, grade, topic, and individual standard (eg. Common Core, NGSS, Texas TEKS). Information about the CC license status of the resource is also displayed. The app is available now on the EduAppCenter; you can also check out a screenshot of how it looks below.

OpenEdSearchApp

 


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__’Faculty Experience with OER’ data on pages 1 – 2 of the ICBA Survey: Faculty Perspective on Digital and OER Course Materialshttp://www.campuscomputing.net/sites/www.campuscomputing.net/files/GOING%20DIGITAL%20-%202016%20ICBA%20Faculty%20Survey_2.pdf __ via the Independent College Bookstore Association’s fall 2015 / winter 2016 survey of 2,902 college and university faculty at 29 two- and four-year colleges and universities.

 



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__data points “According to the 2015 Campus Computing Project, just four percent of general and developmental education courses use adaptive learning technologies.” _ “Our data suggests that the vast majority (87 percent) of college students report that having access to data analytics about their academic performance can have a positive effect on their learning experience.” __

It Takes the Right Tech to Fully Engage the Modern College Mind

It Takes the Right Tech to Fully Engage the Modern College Mind

huffingtonpost.com
  • Peter Cohen McGraw-Hill Education’s Group President of U.S. Education, overseeing the company’s U.S. K-12 and higher education businesses

Today’s college students aren’t necessarily who you might think they are. Much like the rest of us, their relationship with technology has changed radically in just a few short years, and those shifts have had a massive impact on how they study, learn and even think. That in turn means that educators – and, ultimately, anyone hoping to have a meaningful interaction with today’s college-age adults – must fundamentally rethink how they engage with them.



Don Gorges

__Recommend downloading _ http://www.ousa.ca/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Online-Learning2.pdf _ and reviewing the full policy paper for the benefit of the depth of thinking behind the bullet point comments in the press release _

OUSA Releases Online Learning Policy Paper - OUSA.ca

OUSA Releases Online Learning Policy Paper – OUSA.ca

ousa.ca

What does online learning mean to Ontario’s university students? OUSA’s new policy paper, Online Learning, offers insights from students on what their vision for online learning is and what it could be going forward.

Students do not believe that online learning should be used as a replacement for the traditional classroom experience, but rather, that it should act as a complement to in-person academics. To reflect this sentiment, our policy paper focuses on fully-online courses and not fully-online degrees, although both are important to the future of online learning. Ideally, what online learning offers students is flexibility and greater levels of access to post-secondary education, while providing them with the same standards of quality that apply to traditional classes.

The scenarios in which online learning can be most useful are becoming more apparent.



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Ontario announces $27-million for rebuild of Toronto’s OCAD University

Ontario announces $27-million for rebuild of Toronto’s OCAD University

theglobeandmail.com

The province will direct $27-million toward a rebuilding of OCAD University’s downtown Toronto campus that would give the institution long-awaited upgrades to its facilities and a new and improved public face.

The new funding was announced Tuesday by Reza Moridi, Ontario’s Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities. It will go toward the cost of what the university calls its Creative City Campus project. This is a series of additions, renovations and expansions to the complex of buildings along McCaul Street, next to the Art Gallery of Ontario, that houses most of the university.



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Cable Green

Open Education Global 2016 in Krakow this week! #oeglobal http://ow.ly/10yNna #OER #openpolicy

#oeglobal hashtag on Twitter

#oeglobal hashtag on Twitter

twitter.com


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__BCcampus / Lumen Learning partnership will work together on initiatives that improve efficiency and effectiveness of processes, including: _Co-development of code for open-source software platforms such as Pressbooks/Candela and Waymaker. _Shared process for the development and delivery of workshops. _Partnering on technical clean-up of existing OER __

BCcampus and Lumen Learning are pleased to announce a new partnership

BCcampus and Lumen Learning are pleased to announce a new partnership

bccampus.ca

April 11, 2016

BCcampus and Lumen Learning are pleased to announce a new partnership that will allow the two organizations to collaborate more closely to support the effective creation and use of open educational resources (OER).  Both organizations are deeply involved in improving access to post-secondary education through the use of open practices. For both BCcampus and Lumen Learning, this means not only replacing traditionally published resources with those that are open, but also in improving learning through open practices.

 


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Sonny Regelman

If you like books with pictures… http://buff.ly/1UOtfnI

The Most Beautiful Book of 2016 is 'Patterns in Nature'

The Most Beautiful Book of 2016 is ‘Patterns in Nature’

publishersweekly.com
Nature like you’ve never seen it before.

Philip Ball’s Patterns in Nature is a jaw-dropping exploration of why the world looks the way it does, with 250 color photographs of the most dramatic examples of the “sheer splendor” of physical patterns in the natural world. Ball picks out some of the highlights.

  1. Beth Herman Adler

    Sounds right up my alley!



Don Gorges commented on this

__”College Textbook Prices Have Risen 1,041 Percent Since 1977″ is the Thesis for a Critical Thinking Exercise-Test __ Imagine if ones’ [i.e. policymaker/admin/academic] – income – employment – tenure path – performance review – were based on providing correct research-backed answers to a set of T/F/Essay questions framed by information within this NBC News article.

__Graph in this NBC NEWS article is used for dramatic effect in OER advocacy presentations to create a lasting perception without showing data-supporting details. Textbooks are individual consumer products, not a commodity, so it’s relevant to know which textbooks are used in this BLS reference and attempt to understand the reasons why their prices increased _ http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/freshman-year/college-textbook-prices-have-risen-812-percent-1978-n399926 _

 

__Richard Hershman, National Association of College Stores, Vice President of Government Relations – “The economics of the textbook prices discussion above lacks an understanding of what the Bureau of Labor Statistics is tracking in the Consumer Price Index, which I have been following and studying for 12 years now.” “BLS has failed to update their design like they have in other indices, it tells us less and less on what really is going on.” see his explanation details #4) – in the comments section of this article _ http://openoregon.org/what-is-the-cost-of-course-materials-at-each-community-college-in-oregon/

 



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Audrey Watters tweet:   “Seriously. Stop it with this “21st century skills” bull****___

__I was unable to find the source of image Audrey Watters posted or understand the context or reason for her tweet –   I replied with the url to Policymakers – P21 _ http//www p21 org/our-work/resources/for-policymakers#whyskills __

As a result she blocked me from viewing her tweet feed.

This post is to archive the last tweet Audrey Watters shared with me

. . . Seriously

 



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McGraw-Hill Education

We’re honored to have ten CODiE 2016 finalists from our PreK-12 and Higher Education teams: Congratulations to all of this year’s nominees and finalists!

10 Learning Science Solutions Named as 2016 CODiE Award Finalists!

10 Learning Science Solutions Named as 2016 CODiE Award Finalists!

mheducation.com

Each year, the CODiE Awards program from the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) recognizes the most innovative products and services in the educational technology industry. Each year’s CODiE Finalists and winners are determined by a rigorous process that includes peer nomination, expert review, and voting by SIIA members.

At McGraw-Hill Education, we’ve been honored with several past CODiE Awards for our learning technologies, curriculum solutions, and content. This year we’re thrilled to have 10 CODiE award finalists selected from our leading ed-tech solutions built on learning science!

Everyday Mathematics is on the list for Best Mathematics Instructional Solution along with ALEKS!

 



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Don Gorges

__At drupa 2016, Benny Landa intends to deliver on that promise with live demonstrations of nanographic equipment that he says can print offset quality at offset speed on any paper stock at an offset-competitive cost. In this exclusive interview, Landa discusses why he believes the commercialization of nanography will be the second time one of his technologies has revolutionized digital printing. __

Landa: Nanography Will Keep Its “Promise” at drupa 2016 on WhatTheyThink

Landa: Nanography Will Keep Its “Promise” at drupa 2016 on WhatTheyThink

whattheythink.com

Exclusive Interview: Benny Landa says that the nanographic inkjet printing process he unveiled at drupa 2012 was a “promise.”

  1. __Story: Following the acquisition of Indigo by Hewlett-Packard in 2002, Benny established the Landa group to pursue his new vision of creating energy from thin air using nanotechnology. During the course of this research, he discovered that the use of nanopigments could revolutionize printing for a second time. Landa’s digital printing division, Landa Digital Printing, developed the Nanographic Printing® process and a line of Nanographic Printing® presses that enable the use of digital printing technology for mainstream applications. _http://www.landanano.com/about-us/company

 


Don Gorges commented on this

__While reading your column I was wondering where you stand on the nature of authorship for these 2 OER research papers, both papers authored by David Wiley, John Hilton III, Lane Fischer, T. Jared Robinson._ The Impact of Open Textbooks on Secondary Science Learning Outcomes _ https://lnkd.in/eqDe948 _ and _ A multi-institutional study of the impact of open textbook adoption on the learning outcomes of post-secondary students _ https://lnkd.in/eAa8PuS _ __

__This note appears in the second paper – “Compliance with ethical standards, Conflict of interest, The authors have no conflict of interest in the execution or outcomes of this study.”

We Need a More Robust Learning Sciences Research Community

We Need a More Robust Learning Sciences Research Community

mfeldstein.com

My latest Chronicle column is on how inherently difficult it is to evaluate learning science claims, particularly when they get boiled down to marketing claims about product efficacy, and how deep academic distrust of vendors makes this already incredibly difficult challenge nearly impossible.

Here’s where I stand on vendor participation in ed tech and learning science research:



Don Gorges commented on this

__Since 2002 the company has turned over 40 percent of its 5,500-person workforce, or 2,200 employees,as Cengage [same story at M-H, Pearson, HMH, Wiley et al. and at Developers too – i.e.Pronk] continues its transformation from being a publisher of textbooks into an edtech company.

Here's Why Cengage Is Laying Off 100 and Then Hiring 150

Here’s Why Cengage Is Laying Off 100 and Then Hiring 150

bostinno.streetwise.co

If you were to look up Glassdoor reviews of Boston-based Cengage Learning, the company that just won BostInno’s Tech Madness competition, it becomes clear that one big complaint is around the recurring layoffs that have taken place as the company changes focus.

Cengage CEO Michael Hansen

Cengage CEO Michael Hansen

As it turns out, Cengage just laid off approximately 100 people, mostly on its publishing side, on Monday and Tuesday, and the company’s CEO, Michael Hansen, was forthcoming in confirming the news when I asked him about it over the phone on Thursday afternoon.

“It’s always painful to see,” Hansen said, “because some of these people have been” around for 10 or 20 years. But, he added, “it’s very much par for the course” as Cengage continues its transformation from being a publisher of textbooks into an edtech company.

While the transformation includes rounds of layoffs, Hansen said, it also includes creating a number of new jobs that primarily support the company’s growing digital side, which represents about 50 percent of total revenue now. He said the company will soon have 150 new job openings, most of them tech-related.

The layoffs, he said, are a reflection of the education market, in that some disciplines, like psychology, are easier to transition from textbooks into digital learning products while others, like anthropology, aren’t and are being de-emphasized as a result.

“Some of the disciplines weren’t moving fast enough,” Hansen said.

 


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__OpenSUNY OER textbooks are now indexed and available in Summon, and soon the full catalogue of OpenStax OER content will be as well [BCcampus soon?] As a result, improved visibility of these open resources in campus Learning Management System environments will make adoption easier for instructors. See The Summon® Service _ https://lnkd.in/e-u6awj _ __https://lnkd.in/ebAd-E5

ProQuest SIPX Teams with OpenStax and OpenSUNY to Boost Access to Open Educational Resources

proquest.com
ProQuest is making OER content more discoverable and visible to instructors through SIPX and Summon.

April 7, 2016 – As part of its continuing commitment to support Open Educational Resources (OER), ProQuest is making OER content more discoverable and visible to instructors through SIPX and Summon. OpenSUNY OER textbooks are now indexed and available in Summon, and soon the full catalogue of OpenStax OER content will be as well ­­­– and connected into SIPX’s course materials technology­.  As a result, improved visibility of these open resources in campus Learning Management System environments will make adoption easier for instructors.

Additionally, through these partnerships, ProQuest, OpenStax and OpenSUNY are introducing more options to help reduce course materials costs for students. “This partnership with OpenStax and OpenSUNY lets us provide more quality, free textbooks to schools and increase visibility of this content,” said Franny Lee, Co-Founder and General Manager of ProQuest SIPX.  “We’re always thrilled to add relevant curriculum materials through ProQuest, and we continue to strive for improving access to quality, affordable higher education for all.”



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__Library professionals will be familar with Courses similar to these offered in Western University Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) program _ LIS 9001 _ LIS 9158 _ https://lnkd.in/ezSzbmR _ Law impacting the information professional will be explored – intellectual freedom, access, privacy, personal data protection, copyright [-] technological innovation>>_ https://lnkd.in/eRESdwN

Creative Commons CC Master Certificate for Librarians

blog.creativecommons.org

Creative Commons is developing a series of certificates to provide organizations and individuals with a range of options for increasing knowledge and use of Creative Commons.

The Creative Commons Master Certificate will define the full body of knowledge and skills needed to master CC. This master certificate will be of interest to those who need a broad and deep understanding of all things Creative Commons.

In addition, custom certificates are being designed for specific types of individuals and organizations. Initially Creative Commons is focusing on creating a specific CC Certificate for 1. educators, 2. government, and 3. librarians. The CC Certificate for each of these will include a subset of learning outcomes from the overall CC Master Certificate along with new learning outcomes specific to each role.

All certificates will include both a modular set of learning materials that can be used independently for informal learning, and a formal, structured and facilitated certificate the can be taken for official certification.

 


Don Gorges commented on this

__Is blockchain poised to be “the next big thing” in education? Audrey Watters has been giving a lot of thought to the question _ See: The Blockchain for Education: An Introduction _ http://hackeducation.com/2016/04/07/blockchain-education-guide _

  1. __Here are two blockchain-related articles which you may also find interesting _ “Could a Blockchain-Based Registry Ever Replace the Copyright Office?” _http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/could-a-blockchain-based-registry-ever-99770/_ and “RR Donnelley to Pursue New Blockchain-Enabled Capabilities for Publishing Industry” _http://investor.rrd.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=960331_ __[posted graphic source url – http://www.bivident.com/index.php#merger-modal]

 


Don Gorges commented on this

__I found the Q&A is likely an effective way to convey a tone of confidence within the investor market _ . . . I’d add an observation about body language – see 2-shot at 6:01 – consider if JF would have moved forward with hands on the table and relaxed his shoulders – offered purely from a visual communications perspective __ https://lnkd.in/e7tRVU8

Pearson CEO on Education Business, Company's Future

Pearson CEO on Education Business, Company’s Future

bloomberg.com

Pearson Chief Executive Officer John Fallon talks to Bloomberg’s David Westin about the progress of the company’s restructuring plan, growth strategy, and the company’s outlook.

 



Don Gorges commented on this

__Well done, Mary Burgess Paul Stacey _The video [4th of a series of 6 on OER Policy] is conceived, produced and maintained by the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC). This project was initiated in support of the Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) Grant Program _see OPEN Washington OER Policy Series _

The B.C. Open Textbook Project video

Sustaining a Large Scale Open Project: The B.C. Open Textbook Project

openwa.org
“ Sustainability is not so much about ongoing grant funding but about baking this into the regular daily operations of an institution.” This segment tells a story of a highly successful Open Textbook project in British Columbia, Canada and how the project sustained momentum and funding. Stacey and Burgess, former and current Directors of Open Education at BCcampus first discuss the history of the Open Texbook Project and illustrate the key elements that influenced the initiative’s early success.

 


Don Gorges commented on this

__University of Saskatchewan Open Textbook Authoring Guide “The primary audience for this book is faculty and post-secondary instructors who are developing, adapting or adopting open textbooks at the University of Saskatchewan. However, there may be content within this book that is useful to others working on similar Open Educational Resource initiatives.” __

USask Open Textbook Authoring Guide – Ver.1.0

USask Open Textbook Authoring Guide – Ver.1.0

openpress.usask.ca
This book is a practical guide to adapting or creating open textbooks using the PressBooks platform. It is continually evolving as new information, practices and processes are developed. The primary audience for this book are faculty and post-secondary instructors in Saskatchewan, Canada who are developing, adapting or adopting open textbooks at the University of Saskatchewan. However, there may be content within this book that is useful to others working on similar Open Educational Resource initiatives.


Don Gorges commented on this

__My respect for Rajiv Jhangiani work as a missionary with sincere ‘social justice’ motives. Although his bias against publishing professionals distorts the message.

public lecture by Rajiv Jhangiani

Enhancing pedagogy via open educational practices – public lecture by Rajiv Jhangiani

YouTube

February 9th, 2016 at McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning, McMaster University

“Open educational practices” is a broad term that encompasses the creation and adoption of open textbooks and other open educational resources, open course development, and open pedagogy. This presentation will make a case for why the move away from traditional (closed) practices is not only desirable but inevitable, and how students, faculty, institutions, and our communities all stand to benefit greatly from this transformation..

Rajiv Jhangiani is a faculty member in the Department of Psychology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. He conducts research on open education, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and political psychology.

 



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Don Gorges

Don Gorges

Visual Communications in Educational Resources,
Open Design, Creative Services, Marketing



 

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