Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts and Links November 6 to November 22

 

Visual Communications Marketing Copyright Open Education Design Thinking

Don Gorges

Don Gorges

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Don Gorges commented on this

__A recent blog posting by David Wiley pointed to a problem of stereotyping, blind distrust of, and even antagonism toward, ‘commercial entities’ by those involved in the Open Education Community. [ Stereotyping, Behavior, and Belonging in the Open Education Community by David _ http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/4794 _ ]

This Pearson video is worth a look and, hopefully, it helps put things into perspective.

people-of-pearson

People of Pearson

YouTube

Recently in our Hoboken, NJ office, we asked Pearson employees a few questions about why they work here. Here’s what they had to say.

2016 11 22

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Don Gorges commented on this

A Glossary of Engraving Terms

Due to its insanely minute ability to render detail, engraving remains the most amazing print reproduction process in the world. Albeit stationery-centric, I wrote a book about it, The Complete Engraver. For a wider audience, I excerpted and edited the glossary of terms and definitions of this erstwhile and under-appreciated process.
engraving-glossary-v2-nc-wfotos-2FIGURE 2 – Close-up: D.J. Pound engraving of Prince Albert illustrating how the detail is rendered, one dot and dash at a time—in engraved prints. The original of this print was engraved by hand. Courtesy of the author.

__Several Minneapolis Institute of Art videos help describe Printmaking Processes: Intaglio: _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNKn4PORGBI __ Printmaking Processes: Lithography _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHw5_1Hopsc __ Printmaking Processes: Relief _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0skLwaFpn0 __ Printmaking Processes: Screenprinting _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wogKeYH2wEE _

The Printed Image in the West: Engraving

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/engr/hd_engr.htm

2016 11 22

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Excellent points, Michael. Learners/Students should/can also be enabled by providing ways for them to be more self-aware – to understand, interpret, correlate and make use the data collected – i.e. visibility and control of data points that enable them to monitor and modify their own behaviour and habits

Analytics Literacy is a Major Limiter of Ed Tech Growth

Analytics Literacy is a Major Limiter of Ed Tech Growth

mfeldstein.com

Right now, the educational technology market is blithely barreling down the road of developing sexy, sophisticated algorithms. Setting aside the very serious and poorly attended question of student data privacy, there is an implicit assumption that if the algorithms become sophisticated enough, then the market will follow. But “sophisticated” also means “complex.” If we, as a culture, lack the basic literacy to have clear intuitions about what “a 70% chance” means, then how likely is it that we won’t have shocks that cause us to distrust our learning analytics because we didn’t understand their assumptions and limitations? These products face very serious (and completely justifiable) market risk as long as practitioners don’t understand them.

We need to transform our teaching culture into one of learning science and data science literacy. We need our educators to understand how algorithmic storytelling works and develop intuitions about data interpretation. There are two sides to this coin. On the one hand, this means developing new skills and embracing the sciences of teaching and learning. On the other hand, it means not fetishizing the instruments to the point where we no longer think to touch the patient’s back. Data should extend our senses, not be a substitute for them. Likewise, analytics should augment rather than replace our native sense-making capabilities.

2016 11 20

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Don Gorges commented on this

__The Global Information Technology Report 2016 – Innovating in the Digital Economy, highlights striking innovation patterns in the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) data that can help point the way for policy and investment priorities. _ http://reports.weforum.org/global-information-technology-report-2016/

networked-readiness-index

2016 11 20

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Follett Corporation today announced it has acquired Valore Inc. and the ValoreBooks marketplace solution for students and bookstores to buy, sell and rent college textbooks online. [no mention of the status of Boundless Textbooks which Valore had acquired Apr 2015] __

Follett Acquires Valore Inc.

follett.com

Nov 17, 2016 – Follett Corporation, a global leader in education and entertainment content distribution, today announced it has acquired Valore Inc. and the ValoreBooks marketplace solution for students and bookstores to buy, sell and rent college textbooks online.  Combining the convenience of the ValoreBooks marketplace with the scope and capabilities of Follett will provide campus stores and students greater access to more affordable course material options.  Terms of the transaction were not released.

2016 11 17

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Don Gorges commented on this

Stereotyping, Behavior, and Belonging in the Open Education Community

Stereotyping, Behavior, and Belonging in the Open Education Community

opencontent.org

Stephen Downes points to some older but interesting posts by Lisa Petrides and Bill Fitzgerald about the role of commercial actors in the open space. It’s a topic that I’ve been thinking about recently, particularly with yesterday’s revelation that Microsoft has joined the Linux Foundation. For someone who was online during the 90s, this is completely unimaginable. I had to read the full announcement to convince myself it was true. What the heck is going on?

[-]

To end where I began, let us pause to consider the open education analog of Microsoft joining the Linux Foundation. Can you imagine a future in which Pearson, McGraw Hill, or Cengage announce that they had openly licensed part of their catalog, publishing it online for the world to freely use, download, edit, and share? (Before you laugh at the impossibility of this, let me remind you that Microsoft just joined the Linux Foundation.) How would the community respond? How would you respond? I would welcome them with open arms, and hope you would as well. Just as open source software has benefited immensely from respected and valued contributions from IBM, RedHat, Google, and other companies, open education would benefit significantly from greater contributions from companies. Specifically, students would benefit significantly from these contributions. We, the open education community, just need to restrain ourselves from running organizations out of town on a rail simply because they’re for-profits.

I hope that in the near future we can collectively reach a place where we judge organizations by their behavior and not their articles of incorporation. We should be welcoming, cheering for, and supporting companies that behave in ways that are consistent with our values. I’ll reserve dreams of a distant future where we achieve No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor for the mid-2020s.

Don Gorges commented on this

__David Wiley’s sermon-approach to promoting the norms and values of Lumen Learning OER services is an authentic ‘one and only’ marketing strategy _”David: I’m a Mormon, so that’s what you get when I’m at the front of the room. My approach to life is very much I roll out of bed every day and whatever it feels like God wants me to do that day is what I’m going to do. [-] Whatever feels to me like is the thing that will be most useful to Him is what I’m going to do.” When David says “Textbooks are immorally expensive” I know where he’s coming from, and don’t discriminate against his field of endeavor. But this judgemental rhetoric within the OER community is disappointing when you expect Academics and educators to be thoughtful, analytical, and beyond intellectually lazy habits like stereotyping.

2016 11 17

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Michael Haggen, Chief Academic Officer, Scholastic Education. “The report also shows us educators’ belief that given the right resources, including high-quality instructional materials, community and family partners, and professional development, they can provide a quality education for every young person who walks through their doors.” __

Survey of Teachers & Principals Explores Barriers to Equity in Education and the Resources Needed to Support Students

mediaroom.scholastic.com

The views and experiences of more than 4,700 public school Pre-K–12 teachers and principals representing all 50 states and the District of Columbia were revealed today by Scholastic (NASDAQ: SCHL) in a new report, the Teacher & Principal School Report: Equity in Education. Findings show the overwhelming majority of educators (97%) agree that “equity in education for all children should be a national priority.” However, they report that barriers to equity are pervasive across school poverty levels and a lack of resources to support students exists both in- and out-of-school. The report provides new data on teachers’ and principals’ views regarding the barriers to equity, educators’ funding priorities and personal spending for students and classrooms, the role of families and communities, and professional development needs.

To download the full report, visit www.scholastic.com/teacherprincipalreport.

2016 11 16

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Don Gorges commented on this

Our 2016 Advocacy Week Recommendations

Our 2016 Advocacy Week Recommendations

casa-acae.com

Post-secondary education continues to be the great equalizer in Canada, providing knowledge, training and economic opportunity to all types of people across all fields of interest. Knowing this, government must continue to build on its commitments for equitable growth by making post-secondary education accessible, affordable, innovative, and high quality. Doing so will open doors for all Canadians to achieve their personal and professional goals and contribute to society in a meaningful way.

While there is no single mechanism for securing long-term economic growth within a country, ensuring Canada has a highly trained and educated population is a strong step in the right direction. In addition, an educated population is also proven to promote higher levels of engagement among citizens, resulting in greater social benefits for communities throughout the country.

 The Canadian Alliance of Student Associations (CASA) is calling on the federal government to lead Canada by investing in an inclusive and innovative economy.

Don Gorges commented on this

__CASA recommends the following federal government investments: _$27 million per year to establish a six-month, interest-free grace period for CSLP loans; _$50.1 million per year into the CSGP and allow master’s and doctoral students to access the program; _establish a funding mechanism to support the up-front costs of accessing a mental health disability assessment through the Canada Student Loans Program at a cost of $9 million per year;

__$106 million per year over the next three years to fully fund the Post-Secondary Student Support Program and address the program’s backlog; _create a “Reconciliation through Post-Secondary Education” Program to support reconciliation programming at institutions throughout the country at a cost of $26 million; _expand experiential learning opportunities by investing an additional $73 million over 4 years into the Post-Secondary Industry Partnership and Co-operative Placement Initiative; _adopt the model used in Quebec to create a Canada Training Incentive; _support complete research costs, at a cost of $286.5 million per year;

__and invest $7 million per year as a pilot project for supporting OERs, as they increase access to learning for all of society and are capable of reaching non-traditional student groups. The details of the proposed OER Pilot Program investment are not found in the CASA briefing document _ http://media.wix.com/ugd/ca1567_78b2bae6fa7b438faf335f38ee9cc364.pdf

2016 11 13

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Don Gorges commented on this

__You are a highly trained, skilled professional, but the academic job market is less than rosy [The 2016 OCUFA Study of Precarious Employment in Academia] . . . Some advice for an ‘academic entrepreneur’ who can convince others that your independent online course is a good investment of time and money. __

Advice to academics for creating and selling online courses (essay) | Inside Higher Ed

Advice to academics for creating and selling online courses (essay) | Inside Higher Ed

How to Create and Sell Courses Online

Kirsten Drickey provides some concrete advice for leveraging your teaching experience and subject matter expertise by teaching online courses beyond the academy.

2016 11 15

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Don Gorges commented on this

Recommended Reading: Times Higher Education (THE) Reports on Student Views of Blended Learning

the-report-blended-learning-survey
Citing in-house research that surveyed over 100,000 students in the United States, THE reported late last week (see article) that students in exclusively face to face courses and students in exclusively online courses tended to give higher marks to their programs than those students taking blended courses that combine face to face learning with online learning. The report suggests that there is something about the design, implementation or execution of blended learning that is leading to lower overall satisfaction among students across several metrics that were tracked. For those universities pursuing some form of blended learning, and the list is growing every day, the THE report provides a launching point for new conversations around what is working and what isn’t working on their campuses.

Don Gorges commented on this

__Excellent points, O’Neal, “Blended learning is in its early stages and measurement and analysis are key factors that can drive improvement.” _ Also shines a light on the importance of Student Survey question design and methodology _ perhaps useful data can be gained through a sequence of follow-up questions, seeking more than a 1-10 rating scale _ i.e. “Value for money” responses lack correlations to the variables of ‘mostly online’ Course design meeting students’ expectations. _You might find this related Globe&Mail article interesting, it reflects a positive view of the flexibility of hybrid blended and online learning _ http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/education/students-appreciate-flexibility-of-distance-learning/article32799209/

2016 11 15

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Jamie Way

We will work for toys,Christmas is coming up .

say hello hello hello to third person.

say hello hello hello to third person.

Susan Elsley on LinkedIn

Announcing a teaming up of two creative minds under the name Third Person. Jamie Way and Susan Elsley are spirited thinkers with years of big agency experience in Toronto. Sure, you can find a writer for this and a photographer for that, but there is a special magic that happens when you hire a creative team that allows two people to create a third person in the room. Ideas get bounced around that wouldn’t happen if the two people worked independently. So take the combination of a British guy that can draw, paint, photograph or film anything, and a girl that loves to break the rules and mess around with the alphabet, and you get a third person that doesn’t require an expensive lunch. Third Person takes on interesting projects for design houses, agencies and have their own set of clients. They can think it and they can produce it with the help of a talented collection of editors, designers, producers and musicians they have collaborated with along the way. They enjoy solving business problems in an unorthodox way using original images and modern day poetry. So look around the site and enjoy the new math; 1 + 1 = 3

2016 11 14

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Don Gorges likes this

(in collaboration with Dave Weissburg at Fidelity Labs)

They say “hindsight is 20/20”. If only you knew then what you know now, you would have sold that stock, ended that relationship, or taken that job offer in a snap. Of course the tricky part is being able to make those decisions in the present, but how do you do that without knowing what’s lurking around the corner? I want to argue that by making Futures Thinking a standard part of your thought process – both in your business and personal lives – you’ll be able to make better decisions in the face of uncertainty.

As a design strategist, I have helped design dozens of products and services. The process is always pretty similar – we invest a lot of time upfront to understand our users, generate insights about their needs, create and test a wide range of solutions to satisfy those needs, and then build a business model to bring the winning one(s) to market. It’s a process that is extremely well-suited to do what it was intended to do – creatively solve problems that our audience is facing today in a user-centric way. However, it doesn’t take into account that our users are evolving every day – much like you and I. I never thought twice about this until I did a project in partnership with the Institute for the Future this past summer and learned their Futures Thinking methodology. Rather than trying to predict the future, their methods help you create multiple possible scenarios for what the future might look like. They call it forecasting. As a result, like a weather forecast, you are able to prepare for a broad range of likely things on the horizon and take advantage of impactful opportunities while minimizing surprises. So how do Futures Thinking and Design Thinking compare and perhaps complement each other? And how can we use the two in tandem to get to better outcomes?

The two processes have some stark differences:

1.) The mix of diverging and converging: While both processes require a series of diverging and converging steps, Design Thinking ultimately converges to a concrete concept that is tested, finalized, and brought to market. Futures Thinking, on the other hand, yields a series of scenarios, which are meant to illustrate multiple options for what the future might be without defining an exact prediction. We can then design product concepts for any one of these future scenarios, meaning that the end-point of the Futures Thinking process can be seen as the starting point for the Design Thinking process – one can feed into the other.

2.) The goals and mindsets, which lead to very different outputs: Design Thinking aims to inspire us to create. The goals are products, services, and experiences for today’s world. It helps get to this goal and deal with its inherent ambiguity by relying on a mindset of optimistic confidence that we will ultimately get to the desired outcome. Futures Thinking, on the other hand, aims to inspire. The goal is to think bigger about opportunities we may (or may not) have in the coming years. It aims to inform organizational strategy for tomorrow and make it more robust for the uncertainty that lies ahead. At its core, the process embraces the inherent uncertainty that comes with this, fostering a mindset of pragmatic humility. 

3.) The timeline: Design Thinking focuses on creating for today’s world and the immediate future. As a result, the inspiration stage is usually focused on investigating the present and the immediate past only (a few years back). Futures Thinking aims to illuminate possibilities 10-15 years down the road. As a result, it requires us to look 10-15 years back in time to understand history in order to be able to trace the trajectory of what the implications of the past might be on the future.

4.) The system: Design Thinking, given its more immediate nature, generally only focuses on the more immediate factors relevant to the organization today – the people we’re designing for, our technological constraints, and our business needs. Given its more long-term nature, Futures Thinking embraces a much more systemic approach. On top of looking at the factors immediately relevant to today’s organizational context, it takes into account greater macro factors that may shape the organizational context in the coming years.

However, Futures Thinking also has some undeniable similarities to the Design Thinking.

1.) Inspirational Edges: Both processes look to the fringes as a source of inspiration. In Design Thinking this is done by looking at lead and lag users to expose user needs and analogous systems to show opportunity areas. In Futures Thinking this is done by looking at weak signals of change observed in today’s world and extrapolating what they might become in ten to fifteen years.

2.) People and Experiences: Both processes rely on personas and prototypes to bring abstract concepts to life. In Design Thinking this helps make user needs and product ideas tangible – this helps potential users react to concepts and provide useful feedback. In Futures Thinking this helps make abstract scenarios for what life might be like in the future tangible by putting real items from those worlds in front of business stakeholders.

We could discuss these (and other) similarities and differences for days, but the point is that both processes are valuable in their own right. One of my favorite quotes by Daniel Egger states, “The present creates value so that the future can exist… and the future offers a strategic north and new possible opportunities.” We need to be looking at both to optimize for success and find the alignment between the present and the future.

Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/i-believe-ina-differentinnovation-lab-daniel-egger

The greater question for us as design practitioners, then, is: what do we do about all of this? Can using Future Thinking in our design process benefit us? What will it help us accomplish?

I think that the ultimate benefit of blending the two methodologies is to design products that are more future-proof. Rather than designing something that today’s user will buy today, it helps us better understand what that user might want and need in the future and evolve with him/her. It’s kind of like starting a college savings plan for your newborn. It helps design for longer-lasting relationships with our users – a relationship based on our products and services rather than merely on our brand.

So how do we do it? One option is to commit to Future Thinking and engage in it regularly in parallel with our Design Thinking process – to always have an up-to-date set of possible scenarios for what our future will be 10-15 years from now and align our design initiatives with these visions. This is great, but we’re not all ready to take that leap yet. So in the meantime we can borrow some exercises from the Futures Thinking process and integrate them into our Design Thinking initiatives so start getting steeped in the methodology.

o Looking Back to Look Forward: In Design Thinking we are guided heavily by stories from our users – these are data points about the past. This Futures Thinking exercise can help connect the data points to uncover trajectories. It can help us understand users on a deeper level by seeing how their realities and behaviors have evolved (and how they might continue to evolve). It prompts us to ask questions like: What have been some of the most important trends in the domain/industry we’re designing in and which of them have most affected our user groups? How did these trends change user behaviors/preferences and what were the drivers behind these trends? What might be the next step for these trends if we were to extrapolate them into the future?

o Collecting and Clustering Signals: In Design Thinking look to “tail” users and analogous systems for insights and inspiration. This Futures Thinking exercise can help see how else we might look at what is happening at the “fringes” of our organizational context (in areas that might seem irrelevant at first) to better understand potential opportunity areas. It prompts us to ask questions like: What are some of the most creative, exciting, unusual things happening in the world at large today? What is driving these things to develop? Why are these interesting and what implications might they have in the future? How might they apply to the domain we’re designing in?

o Forecasting Two Curves: In Design Thinking we think about how insights from extreme users can translate to more mainstream user groups. This Futures Thinking exercise provides a structured approach to envision how seeds of change from today’s fringes might make their way into the mainstream and how, conversely, the elements from today’s mainstream might fall to obsolescence. It prompts us to ask questions like: What innovations might stem from today’s signals of change if/when they become mainstream? What needs to happen for the shift to occur and what might the transition look like? What elements of the domain we’re designing for & our user lives will be most transformed as a result? Which parts of today’s mainstream will still be around and which will go away?

o Revealing Unexpected Possibilities: In Design Thinking we generate a lot of observations, insights, and ideas throughout the divergent stages of the process. This Futures Thinking exercise provides a new “mash-up” framework to help make sense of these diverse elements and uncover new opportunity areas. It requires us to generate a lot (at least 50-100) signals of change that you’re seeing in today’s world. These can be news stories, emerging startups, or anything else concrete that you think might have implications for the future. It then prompts us to think about what interesting opportunities could exist at the intersection of various combinations of 2-3 of these signals. It prompts us to ask questions like: Which insights do we find the most intriguing (even if they appear completely unrelated)? What kinds of user needs could exist at the intersection of these insights if you combined them? Which user needs seem to be the most critical? What kinds of new products and experiences could exist to fill the intersection of these needs?

Futures Thinking can often seem nebulous and uncomfortable – much like Design Thinking did back when you were less familiar with it. I hope that this overview peaked your interest and made you see the value behind it. I also hope that it made you want to explore how Future Thinking might make you a better designer and strategist. Finally, I hope that this is just the beginning of a movement to bring the two disciplines closer together over the coming years and the start of a conversation around how we do so.

2016 11 14

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Brian Kenji Iwana and Seiichi Uchida at Kyushu University in Japan [-] have trained a deep neural network [machine-vision algorithm] to study book covers and determine the category of book they come from. “This paves the way for AI systems to design the covers themselves.”

_ hehehe _ Segue to Chip Kidd: Designing books is no laughing matter. OK, it is. _ https://www.ted.com/talks/chip_kidd_designing_books_is_no_laughing_matter_ok_it_is

You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but a neural network can

You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but a neural network can

technologyreview.com

A machine-vision algorithm can tell a book’s genre by looking at its cover. This paves the way for AI systems to design the covers themselves.

Today we get an answer thanks to the work of Brian Kenji Iwana and Seiichi Uchida at Kyushu University in Japan. These guys have trained a deep neural network to study book covers and determine the category of book they come from.

Their method is straightforward. Iwana and Uchida downloaded 137,788 unique book covers from Amazon.com along with the genre of book. There are 20 possible genres but where a book was listed in more than one category, the researchers used just the first.Next, the pair used 80 percent of the data set to train a neural network to recognize the genre by looking at the cover image.  Their neural network has four layers, each with up to 512 neurons, which together learn to recognize the correlation between cover design and genre. The pair used a further 10 percent of the dataset to validate the model and then tested the neural network on the final 10 percent to see how well it categorizes covers it has never seen.

The results make for interesting reading.

More on machine learning

2016 11 14

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Don Gorges commented on this

How are universities evolving to serve the needs of 21st-century learners?

How are universities evolving to serve the needs of 21st-century learners?

Ken Steele on LinkedIn

This week, Ken Steele speaks with 10 university presidents and 2 senior administrators about the ways in which universities are evolving to meet the needs of 21st Century Learners.

Don Gorges commented on this

__Well done, Ken. You will likely be posting your interview video to #OUF2016 twitter soon and I expect those students we see in the bkgrd, who attended OUF2016, could get valuable insights from these answers. _Since, by design, you needed to be brief, much of the conversation with each interviewee is on the cutting room floor. I imagine it might be interesting to each of these Presidents / Execs to be able to publish a full or lightly edited print transcript of their own responses on their University’s website – perhaps they would take the opportunity to frame these topics with their institution’s unique perspective.

Thanks Don. I did wonder about releasing the interviews individually, although it doesn’t really fit our podcast format. There aren’t enough hours in the day! I’ll certainly give it some thought…

2016 11 13

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Don Gorges commented on this

__The Modern Learning Platform – Founder’s Vision _ Howard Weiner of NobleStream with Phil Hill and Michael Feldstein from e-Literate, discuss their respective paths to being rational voices of EdTech in Higher Ed and explore all facets of the Learning Platform decision in context of the myriad of new technologies and teaching pedagogies reaching the space.

 

Don Gorges commented on this

__See how Phil and Michael’s view of Institutional priorities relates to Educause’s annual roundup of the most pressing issues in higher ed technology _ https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/10/student-success-pervades-top-it-issues-for-2017.aspx _ #1_Information security: 2_Student success and completion: Applying data and predictive analytics to improve student success and completion; 3_Data-informed decision making: Helping administrators, faculty and students use data 4_Strategic leadership: Promoting the role of IT leadership as a strategic partner with institutional leadership; 5_Sustainable funding: Developing funding models for IT that sustain core services, support innovation and enable growth; 6_Data management and governance: 7_Higher education affordability: Prioritizing IT investments and resources in the context of increasing demand and limited resources; 8_Sustainable staffing: in the face of shrinking or flatlining budgets; 9_Next-generation enterprise IT: and 10_Digital transformation of learning: Working with faculty and academic leadership in using technology for teaching and learning in innovative ways and to support the school’s mission.

2016 11 12

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Don Gorges likes this

Cengage Learning

Instructional Design 101 Part 1: What is Instructional Design?

The field of instructional design has gotten a lot of attention lately, especially in the world of higher education. But even some experienced instructional designers have a hard time explaining exactly what  they do. The Instructional Design 101 series will explore the basics of what instructional design is and how it can help colleges and universities better serve their students.

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Instructional Design 101 Part 2: Why Does Your Institution Need Instructional Design? - The Cengage Learning Blog

Instructional Design 101 Part 2: Why Does Your Institution Need Instructional Design? – The Cengage Learning Blog

blog.cengage.com

The field of instructional design has gotten a lot of attention lately, especially in the world of higher education. But even some experienced instructional designers have a hard time explaining exactly what it is they do. The first post of the Instructional Design 101 series gave a broad overview of what instructional design is. This post will explain exactly why it’s so valuable.

2016 11 12

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Don Gorges likes this

Open Educational Resources- The Technology

YouTube

Recording of the OER Technology colloquium with NobleStream’s Howard Weiner featuring Chief Product Officer of panOpen, Josh Mullineaux, who is taking us for a deep dive of the panOpen platform.

2016 11 12

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Don Gorges commented on this

Cable Green

Open Educational Resources (OER) - The Commonwealth Education Hub

Open Educational Resources (OER) – The Commonwealth Education Hub

thecommonwealth-educationhub.net

Policy Brief on Open Educational Resources (OER)

Executive summary: Open Educational Resources (OER) are educational materials that are freely available and can be legally used and modified by anyone. Properly leveraged, OER can help everyone in the world access free, high quality, learning materials. OER can help governments meet the aims set out in the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially with regard to SDG4: ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education, and promoting lifelong learning opportunities for all. This policy brief describes open educational resources, open licenses, open education licensing policies, and actions governments may take to support open education in their countries.

This policy brief has been written by Creative Commons with input from the Commonwealth of Learning and the Commonwealth Secretariat. It is posted here for comment and input prior to being finalised in December 2016. Comment may be sent by email to: eduhub@commonwealth.int . Kindly comment by 3 December 2016 either via the email address or the comment box at the bottom of this page.

Policy Brief on OERDownload the Policy Brief (updated on 19 November 2016) on OER
(PDF | DOCX | RTF | ODT)

 

Don Gorges commented on this

__Policy Brief on Open Educational Resources is aimed at Education policy makers and planners in government and institutions – the recommendation is broken down into 10 points, #1. Foster awareness and promote the use of OER – to #10. Encourage the open licensing of educational materials produced with public funds. There currently is a low level of awareness and experience using OER, it is incumbent on policy makers to gain an expertise in both the pros and the cons to be able to consider an Open education licensing policy that publicly funded education resources (i.e. paid for by taxpayers’ money) should be openly licensed by default.

2016 11 11

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Naza Djafarova

We [ChangSchool] are creating games in 3 months. Check our simulation game:

Therapeutic Communication and Mental Health Assessment Demo

Don Gorges commented on this

__Very impressive simulation game example, Naza. _ Readers, to get the most from this short demo, be prepared to pause and read the text frames like slides. Really interesting.

Making Video Games for Higher Ed Requires Major Investment. Is It Worth It? (EdSurge News)

Making Video Games for Higher Ed Requires Major Investment. Is It Worth It? (EdSurge News)

edsurge.com

A majority of young adults already play video games, so using them in courses seems like a natural fit. But building World of Warcraft or a similar blockbuster game requires massive production teams and millions of dollars. For higher education, with smaller potential audiences and student outcomes at stake, companies are debating whether return on investment is there for game-based learning experiences.

2016 11 11

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Don Gorges commented on this

__”In 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada amended the country’s copyright law, expanding its “fair-dealing” provision for the purposes of education, parody, and satire. As a result of the way many educational institutions have defined the new fair dealing rules, schools are paying less money to copyright holders. Roanie Levy, Access Copyright’s executive director, says the organization’s 2017 payout will be 80 per cent less than it distributed in 2013 ” __

Access Copyright projecting 55 per cent drop in 2017 royalties | Quill and Quire

quillandquire.com

Access Copyright is warning creators and publishers to brace for a significant decrease in their royalty payments next year.

The non-profit organization, which collects revenues on behalf of Canadian copyright holders, estimates the amount it pays to creators to drop to $5 million in 2017, from $11 million this year – a 55 per cent decrease that is being directly attributed to a reduction in revenue from the educational sector.

Roanie Levy, Access Copyright’s executive director, expects educational publishers and content creators, such as authors, across the board will be affected most by the reduction. “When you consider the scope and size of these industries, and these businesses, and the income of creators, you quickly see how damaging this kind of decline is,” she says. “It’s a death by a thousand cuts.” Although Levy refers to the current situation as an “impasse,” she says Access Copyright is working with the educational sector to better understand its needs, and is testing out a transactional model that could potentially replace the traditional blanket licence: “What is absolutely critical for us is that we develop something that meets the needs of the educational institutions.”

2016 11 10

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Don Gorges likes this

Students appreciate flexibility of distance learning

Students appreciate flexibility of distance learning

theglobeandmail.com
Colleges and universities are moving more and more into online and blended hybrid deliveries for postsecondary programs, in addition to what they have traditionally offered in continuing education online. Allison Pillwein, a 23-year-old Niagara College student, is a fan of online learning. Currently in her first year of a social service worker program, Ms. Pillwein likes that many of her lecture courses are online hybrids – meaning that part of the delivery is online and part is face-to-face in class – such as the abnormal psychology course she elected to take this fall.

“Hybrid learning gives us the advantage of having technology available to learn in the way that we’ve grown used to,” says Ms. Pillwein, who is also a Brock University graduate. “In the abnormal psychology course, the online component is mainly tests and quizzes that you can do in your own time. I’ve found that suits my learning style more, as opposed to doing a test in class where you’d have to memorize a lot of terms and concepts.”

Ms. Pillwein also likes that the professor uploads all of her PowerPoint presentations for students to access and review. She feels that helps get the material embedded in her brain more than writing things down word for word during the lecture.

“Being online allows you a lot of flexibility in how you choose to learn,” Ms. Pillwein says. “You can tweak how you study and how you learn the material rather than being forced to do it only one way in the classroom session.”

[-]

Patrick Lyons, director of teaching and learning services at Carleton University in Ottawa, visualizes online learning taking many different forms, presenting all kinds of opportunities that could not be delivered any other way. Carleton has a long history offering distance learning, first broadcasting courses on a local cable TV channel in 1978 and then offering the world’s first video podcast of a university credit course in 2006. Currently, as many as one-third of all Carleton students register and complete an online course in a given year.

“If you think broadly and creatively, you can have wonderfully rich online activities,” says Mr. Lyons. “The tools are astounding right now. We’ve had instructors facilitate a completely online language course in a 3-D environment where they were meeting in a virtual space as avatars. We’ve had courses featuring engaging short lectures from amazing people who might otherwise be difficult to bring into a classroom, such as a supreme court justice, an RCMP officer and a practising physician.”

Mr. Lyons says he has watched some instructors at Carleton hold more engaging seminars online with richer communications than he has seen in face-to-face seminars. One example he gives is a graduate course with a small class of about 30 students who meet online at the same time.

“In some ways it mirrors a face-to-face seminar graduate course where you’d have a live discussion going back and forth, but you’re doing this online with 30 people spread out around the world,” says Mr. Lyons. “And because of the technology, they’re able to break out into groups and have these small private discussions between three and four people and then bring that back to class. The wealth of ideas and the rich diversity that they’re bringing are so different compared with a face-to-face classroom environment. Online learning can absolutely bring us new opportunities to connect people who may not be easily connected, and in areas where face-to-face teaching may not be the best choice.”

2016 11 11

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Don Gorges likes this

Leonard Cohen and the Strawberry.

Leonard Cohen and the Strawberry.

Ian Mirlin on LinkedIn

Leonard Cohen passed away last night.

No other could climb so high up the ladder, bring down such

profound ideas and then crystallize them into popular music.

The amount of translation that involves can be only be done by the most evolved of souls.

I once asked my copy class at OCADU to revisit a common fruit or vegetable and to examine their selection to find a fresh insight.

A young lady working with a strawberry, brilliantly observed: ‘A strawberry is the only fruit that has the courage to wear its seeds on the outside’.

I think of the strawberry today.

Such was the transparent honesty of Leonard Cohen as a poet, a novelist, a songwriter

and as a human being.

2016 11 11

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Don Gorges likes this

Andrew Shortt

If you want to be a great copywriter, or if you want the copywriters in your agency to be great writers, have them go to Neil French’s website and rewrite every ad, by hand.

the NEIL FRENCH site

the NEIL FRENCH site

neilfrench.com

2016 11 11

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Don Gorges commented on this

__”We like the things that we like as human beings, we like feelings, we like experiences . . . and whatever products gets us close to that, that’s the product we go with . . . products that have the user experience at their very core . . . if anyone has a Design Thinking approach or mindset, you look at the world and go, why does it work like this when we could redesign this and make it so much better . . . “

design-is-future-film

Design Is Future Film

YouTube

This film is the result of the last edition of ‘Design is Future congresstival’ held at Disseny Hub Barcelona from 6 to 8 June during the Barcelona Design Week. It showcases the main highlights and strong ideas from the 15 speakers that took part in the Design is Future 2016, as well as from the presenter and curators of the event.

They all share with the audience their main insights about the key role of design while explaining how it helps professionals, businesses and society to be more innovative and sustainable.

This film is an idea by Toormix and BCD Barcelona Centre de Disseny for the Barcelona Design Week 2016. Directed by Laura Sans with the support of Fabrica.

2016 11 11

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Dr. Terry Anderson’s three-part series, Three Pillars of Educational Technology, covers Learning Management Systems, Social Media, and Personal Learning Environments, and how they might best be used for enhanced teaching and learning. _ 3 parts via Contact Northhttp://teachonline.ca/sites/default/files/tools-trends/downloads/cn-three_pillars_part_1.pdf _ http://teachonline.ca/sites/default/files/tools-trends/downloads/cn-three_pillars_part_2.pdf _ http://teachonline.ca/sites/default/files/tools-trends/downloads/cn-three_pillars_part_3.pdf

2016 11 09

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Third-party published content is regularly shared by 38% of business professionals without consideration of copyright, despite the acknowledgement of serious risks and implications of copyright infringement by 74% of those business professionals. _ http://storage.pardot.com/37852/179398/2016_Information_Seeking__Consumption_and_Use_Report_NA_EU.pdf _ Information Seeking Consumption and Use Report – Copyright Clearance Center

Content Sharing and Consumption on the Rise, Copyright Awareness at a Low

Content sharing is essential in business today, the study shows, as it fosters collaboration and speeds up innovation.

  • 97% of respondents share content with their team monthly, and 38% say that they forward information without thinking about copyright issues.
    • 26% of executives share content without thinking about copyright.
  • More than one-third (36%) of all shared information is externally published, down from 41% in 2013.
    • 69% share information with clients, 68% share with business partners, and 65% share content with colleagues in international locations.
  • Since 2013, the number of instances of content sharing (forwarding work-related information such as articles, pictures, and video clips) has dropped from seven times a week to five, while the number of people the content is shared with has declined from eleven to an average of nine people a week.

Shifts in Sharing Methods

Although email is still the most frequent means of sharing information, users are increasingly choosing to make information available to colleagues through shared network drives and intranet postings as well as collaboration tools such as Microsoft SharePoint, Dropbox and CRM systems.

  • Email remains the most widely used tool for information sharing; 66% of respondents send email attachments, 51% share links and 39% paste text into an email.
    • Sharing content in email attachments has dropped since 2013, from 87% of respondents to 66%.
  • Collaboration tools made significant gains in popularity, with 24% of respondents reporting use versus only 11% in 2011.

Executives Share a High Volume of Content, Much of it from Third Party Sources

Executives have a greater appetite for sharing content than middle management and individual contributors, per the survey. Executives share more regularly (nearly seven times per week), share with more people each time (12), and are more likely to share information published by third parties (41%) than internal information or material produced by colleagues within the company.

In competitive, mission-critical or time-critical situations, nearly a third of executives (73%) said they will forward relevant information that will give their organization the competitive edge.

“Protecting intellectual property rights is everyone’s responsibility – knowledge workers, information managers and executives. A solid understanding of what copyright infringement constitutes is critical,” said Jo McShea, VP & Lead Analyst, Outsell. “The potential for exposure to copyright abuse is proliferating. Data from our study indicates more than a third of shared content is from external sources, coupled with a broader base of people with whom information is shared and growing usage of new methods of sharing information such as collaboration networks.”

“It’s vital for organizations to adjust for trends in workflow patterns and to ensure that their copyright policies and educational measures are up to standards to mitigate risk,” said Gretchen Gasser-Ellis, Senior Vice President, Product and Operations, CCC. “Those parties responsible for copyright adherence have their hands full to make sure their organizations’ copyright policies and employee training curriculum consider workflow trends, sharing methods and behavioral nuances related to the user’s role, industry, or geography.”

2016 11 09

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Don Gorges likes this

Amanda Murray

Some of our best and brightest are on the Neo team here at Pearson!

Employee Engagement Soars In Pearson's Interactive Intranet

Employee Engagement Soars In Pearson’s Interactive Intranet

jivesoftware.com

For Pearson’s 40,000-strong workforce, a Jive-powered interactive intranet has become the hub and the heart of company culture.

Engaging a global workforce isn’t easy when all you have is traditional one-way tools like static intranets and email. That’s why Pearson turned to Jive, creating a fully interactive intranet and collaborative hub the company calls “Neo.” It’s become the center of company culture, a place for learning, news and open, two-way dialogue between executives and employees. “It’s really transformed how people feel about working at Pearson,” says Global Community Manager Kim England. And she says things got even better when Pearson moved from a hosted deployment to Jive in the cloud, delivering all the latest and greatest Jive enhancements in regular automatic upgrades.

2016 11 08

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Excellent research / reporting by Heather McCabe and Emi Sasagawa of UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology _

Open textbooks save UBC Math students up to $1,000,000 this year

Open textbooks save UBC Math students up to $1,000,000 this year

flexible.learning.ubc.ca

In an effort to customize materials for their courses and save students money on rising textbook fees, instructors in the Math department at UBC have adopted open or freely accessible textbooks in all first-year courses and most second-year courses.

In addition to the open or freely available textbooks, faculty members use a number of other freely accessible or open resources, such as WeBWorK, a randomized online homework software that automatically grades student work; the Math Exam/Education Resources wiki with past exams and worked out solutions and videos; and course wiki pages which host additional resources. In some cases, students have helped with the production of the online textbooks written by faculty, and contributed to WeBWorK problems and the course wiki pages.
Faculty members in Math who have written their own online textbooks say that they plan to continue to refine them or add features to them to make them more interactive and appealing for students to use.

2016 11 08

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Don Gorges commented on this

__Z-Degree curious? Tidewater Community College / Lumen Learning “Z-Degree” not found in search _ Search Word and Design Marks on US Trademark Electronic Search System (TESS) _ i.e. see _ NANODEGREE _

Why Udacity and EdX Want to Trademark the Degrees of the Future—and What’s at Stake for Students (EdSurge News)

Why Udacity and EdX Want to Trademark the Degrees of the Future—and What’s at Stake for Students (EdSurge News)

edsurge.com

No one owns the term “master’s degree.” But upstart education providers dream of getting a lock on the words for the next generation of online graduate certifications. Their strategy says a lot about how today’s online programs differ from those in the past (Hint: duration and price are just one part of that).

Udacity won a trademark for Nanodegree last year. And in April, the nonprofit edX, founded by MIT and Harvard University to deliver online courses by a consortium of colleges, applied for a trademark on the word MicroMasters. And MicroDegree? Yep, that’s trademarked too, by yet another company.

Sean Gallagher, chief strategy officer at Northeastern University’s Global Network, picked up on this trend recently and wondered what’s going on. He knows the space well, since he literally wrote the book on “ The Future of University Credentials.” And he noticed that at least one key player can’t seem to decide whether it wants its new degrees to be universal or proprietary.

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2016 11 06

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Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts and Links October 29 to November 6

Don Gorges Archive of LinkedIn Posts and Links October 29 to November 6

dongorges.wordpress.com

Topics – Perspectives – Sectors : Open Design Visual Communications Creative Marketing Education

Don Gorges commented on this

__Issues in Postsecondary Education in Canada _ Funding Cuts: Postsecondary education and tuition fees are publicly regulated, our colleges and universities are public institutions; however, public funding currently accounts for less than 49 percent of university and college operating funds, down from 77 percent just 20 years ago. In recent decades, various governments have made the political choice to claw back public funding for post-secondary education and download these costs onto students and their families through tuition fees. The Education Sector human resources cost increases = Tuition and Fees increases. The Creative Sector human resources cost increases = Textbook price increases. The Open Educational Resources OER Movement wages war against the Creative Sector’s Textbooks & Educational Resources pricing.

__Design Is Future Film showcases the main highlights and strong ideas from the 15 speakers that took part in the Design is Future 2016. . . “We like the things that we like. . . and, as human beings, we like feelings, we like experiences . . . and whatever products gets us close to that, that’s the product we go with . . . products that have the user experience at their very core . . . if anyone has a Design Thinking approach or mindset, you look at the world and go, why does it work like this when we could redesign this and make it so much better . . . ” _ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zodT9bCdIiI&feature=youtu.be _

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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