2014-08-01 Don Gorges Posts July 2014

  • Don Gorges

Don Gorges __True Stories of Open Sharing _ http://stories.cogdogblog.com/about/ _ While the Open Education movement focuses on institutional issues and often the sharing of “things” (content, resources), a large ocean exists of powerful individual accomplishments from the simple act of openly sharing what they create, their ideas, or just themselves. [-], this site shares moving, personal stories that would not have been previously possible, enabled by open licensed materials and personal networks. __Alan Levine 1st StoryFilm: “Hellllooo, I’m Nancy White, and here’s another story about openness. . . ” _ http://cogdogblog.com/stuff/opened09/player.php?s=nancy-white-2

Don Gorges __The Posted Image Metadata shows one line only, the Title – Downes and Wiley A Conversation on Open Educational Resources 2009_photo-edit_02.jpg _ This points to an issue to be resolved _ The remainder of image metadata is not presented: Author – Don Gorges. Caption – Child of D’Arcy Norman’s photo. From – Microsoft Word – Downes-Wiley.doc _ Author – “Stephen Downes” _ Downes and Wiley – A Conversation on Open Educational Resources 2009 _ http://www.downes.ca/files/Downes-Wiley.pdf _ Cover photo by D’Arcy Norman _ http://www.flickr.com/photos/dnorman/3812258149/ 

 


 

2014-08-01 Don Gorges Posts July 2014

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Don Gorges __”Big Business” bias distorting the picture and shaping perception about textbooks cost with graphic warnings and “crisis of access” premise __The “push poll” techniques used in the PIRG Survey by http://www.studentpirgs.org to collect student survey data [65% opted not to buy textbook due to costs] also give good reasons to question the credibility of advocates’ / lobbyists’ assertions – See methodology of the PIRG Survey on Textbook Costs _ http://calpirgstudents.org/sites/student/files/resources/S13%20Textbooks%20Project%20Packet_0.pdf   

Don Gorges __800% rise in textbook costs over past 30 years support? __ Bureau of Labor Statistics – 6% rise in textbook costs annual average since 1986. Source: Highlights: U.S. GAO – College Textbooks: Enhanced Offerings Appear to Drive Recent Price Increases _ http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-05-806  

Don Gorges __$1200 College Board source: _ https://trends.collegeboard.org/college-pricing/figures-tables/average-estimated-undergraduate-budgets-2013-14 __Consider that “According to the College Board, books and supplies now average around $1,200 per year” is based on administrators’ budget estimates, not actual Student spending, there is no research source to support this assertion. Sourcing 2012 Florida Student Textbook Survey, results indicate Students are spending an average of $300 on textbooks. _ http://www.openaccesstextbooks.org/pdf/2012_Florida_Student_Textbook_Survey.pdf 


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Dr. Mark Taormino Growth has slowed significantly year over year for all tablets, especially the iPad. The market is somewhat saturated with me too products, and products that have not broken any new ground vis vis differentiated functionality. The Surface Pro 3 is changing that, albeit a very shallow adoption curve. As we have mentioned, once the price drops, the growth curve will become much steeper. The initial shallow adoption for a new innovation is very typical of how most innovations diffuse. It’s usually not a rush to adopt at the beginning. Many in technology have come to expect similar growth to the iPad, which was an unusual. The Surface is following a much more normalized trajectory. Educators are slowly realizing that the SP3 is the new benchmark for tablet computing when productivity is considered. The tablet market will become somewhat bifurcated between entertainment/general use tablets, and those for productivity used by students and business users. I would expect the consumption oriented tablets to cost less, and the productivity tablets have a marginal premium. However, the marginal premium cannot be 2-4 times the cost of other devices. Right now MS is banking mostly on business users with deep pockets. Education is generally too small a market for any manufacturer to offer deep discounts. I hope the market price drop happens quickly so we can move students to a better kind of tablet device.


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Comment (1)    Share Kathleen Laya Thanks, Don. Though this was a small survey, the results are not surprising. Print is still a powerful delivery mode. A blended approach is undoubtedly best for both instruction and learning. 


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Don Gorges

Don Gorges

Don Gorges

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Don Gorges __”Whereas the Copyright Act is an important marketplace framework law and cultural policy instrument that, through clear, predictable and fair rules, supports creativity and innovation and affects many sectors of the knowledge economy;” _ Tags: Bill C-11, Fair Dealing, The Copyright Modernization Act _ http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&DocId=5697419&File=39&Col=2 


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Don Gorges __David Wiley positions OER against ©ER and makes a cost-revenue comparison between Pearson’s MyMathLab vs Lumen Learning’s MyOpenMath, _ an assertion OER = ©ER is worth a look to judge how each meets expectations, the ROI, value of time spent by everyone using each of these 2 resources _ http://lnkd.in/d2Jn6B9 

29d ago

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